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291 - 300 of 390 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 283: Ecology, Evolution, and Human Health

Human ecology, human environments, adaptation and plasticity, and their relationship to health and well-being. Comparative context. Topics include human population history, subsistence ecology, demography, reproductive decision making, migration, infectious disease, risk management, and social inequalities. Particular attention will be paid to small-scale subsistence populations. Small-scale societies demonstrate an enormous range of variation in both environmental challenges faced and adaptations thereto. The process of human adaptation cannot be understood in the absence of a grounding in this range of challenge and adaptation.

ANTHRO 283B: Human Mobility and Adaptability (ANTHRO 183B)

Mobility, whether in the form of seasonal or permanent migration, is an ancient practice necessary for many subsistence strategies, including hunting-and-gathering and pastoralism. Many new forms of mobility have emerged and now it is nearly impossible to consider a patch of human society that is not engaged in or directly impacted by habitual, patterned geographic mobility. Today, almost everywhere in the world, people can get farther, faster; urbanization, environmental degradation, and civil unrest are driving groups of people who do not have a cultural tradition of nomadic migration to adopt a mobile lifestyle¿sometimes permanently, sometimes temporarily¿in search of new economic or resource opportunities. In this seminar course, we will explore modern patterns of human mobility and migration as adaptive strategies for predictably and unpredictably changing environments. Using a framework of biological and cultural adaptation, we will discuss the major types of current human mobility (e.g. nomadism, immigration, migrant labor, displacement) and how they influence and are influenced by social systems, resource access, and health.

ANTHRO 285: Medical Anthropology of Contemporary Africa (ANTHRO 185)

In this course we will examine the place of Africa in global health discourses while reading in-depth histories and ethnographies of the varied causes and consequences of some of the most difficult problems facing African countries today. We will study the effects of colonialism and conflict on health, explore the military and humanitarian connections in the fight against HIV/AIDS, weigh the risks and benefits of population genetic studies on African populations, examine biomedical interventions on, and erasures of, local health problems, and query the role of violence, memory, insecurity, and power in daily life on the continent.

ANTHRO 293B: Master's Thesis Writing Seminar

May be repeated for credit.
| Repeatable for credit

ANTHRO 298B: Digital Methods in Archaeology (ANTHRO 98B, ARCHLGY 98B)

This is a course on digital technologies in archaeology used for documentation, visualization, and analysis of archaeological spaces and objects. Emphasizes hands-on approaches to image manipulation, virtual reality, GIS, CAD, and photogrammetry modeling methods.
Instructors: Rick, J. (PI)

ANTHRO 299: Senior and Master's Paper Writing Workshop (ANTHRO 199)

Techniques of interpreting data, organizing bibliographic materials, writing, editing and revising. Preparation of papers for conferences and publications in anthropology. Seniors register for 199; master's students register for 299.
| Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Poggiali, L. (PI)

ANTHRO 299: Directed Individual Study

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
| Repeatable for credit

ANTHRO 300: Reading Theory Through Ethnography

Required of and restricted to first-year ANTHRO Ph.D. students. Focus is on contemporary ethnography and related cultural and social theories generated by texts. Topics include agency, resistance, and identity formation, and discourse analysis. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 301: History of Anthropological Theory, Culture and Society

Required of Anthropology Ph.D. students. The history of cultural and social anthropology in relation to historical and national contexts and key theoretical and methodological issues as these inform contemporary theory and practices of the discipline. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Instructors: Ferguson, J. (PI)

ANTHRO 301A: Foundations of Social Theory

The purpose of this course is to introduce key themes in social theory - the social, the modern subject, reason, autonomy, civility, interests, exchange, morality, life, the senses - through a reading of classic texts from Descartes up to psychoanalysis and phenomenology. nnEach section has original texts, commentaries, and background readings that place these texts in their deeper historical setting. Many of these commentaries trace how practical theories of 'lower' or minor selves - the subject people of the colonies, slaves, and other - were integral to the very development of ideas of the modern, autonomous and reasonable self in the western world. Prerequisite, by instructor consent.
Instructors: Tambar, K. (PI)
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