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271 - 280 of 390 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 244B: The Buddhist Body in East Asia: Charisma, Gender, and the Gift of the Body (ANTHRO 144B)

This course introduces Buddhist practices and texts of embodiment as a subject of the anthropology of the body. We draw on research in social/cultural anthropology, history, and religious studies, and examine a selection of approaches to the Buddhist body: the body of power in Buddhist charisma, the gender of the bodhisattva¿s and monastic body, the techniques of the body in meditation and martial arts, healing and cultivation, and the gift of the body in bioethics and medical education. We draw on examples in different traditions of Buddhism in a range of societies with a special focus on Chinese Buddhism.

ANTHRO 245: Race and Power (ANTHRO 145, CSRE 145F)

This course examines how race is made. We will pay close attention to how people engage with material, economic, scientific, and cultural forces to articulate human group difference as a given, and even natural. In this seminar, we will look at the construction of race as a literally made phenomenon, where historical, colonial, bodily, market, and humanitarian constituent elements both circulate and sediment racial understandings. To focus our readings and discussions we will divide this vast terrain into three units: race and the colonial encounter, race and biopower, and race and capital.

ANTHRO 245A: Evolutionary Theory in Archaeology

The ability of scientific evolutionary theory to explain human behavior as represented in the archaeological record. Past attempts to apply evolutionary theory in archaeology are compared to more recent Darwinian efforts, as are current evolutionary approaches to human behavior in related fields. The ontological underpinnings and methodological requirements of a Darwinian archaeology and its potential contribution to archaeology as an explanatory system. (HEF I)

ANTHRO 251A: Contemporary Chinese Society Through Independent Documentary Film (ANTHRO 151A)

An overview of social issues in contemporary China as seen through its emerging independent documentary film movement. Topics covered include representations of history, political power and accountability in the reform era, human rights, urbanization, the environment, homelessness and inequality, sexualities, addiction, and the role of media in society. Each viewing is accompanied by readings in media theory or the anthropological/sociological study of contemporary China. Can be taken with or without research component. Films include English subtitles.

ANTHRO 253A: Population and social trends in Japan (ANTHRO 153A)

Anthropological theories and concepts as applied to Japan. Postwar demographic trends. Delayed marriage.  Declining nuclear family.  Re-structuring of education and workplace. Problems for the seniors.  Foreign laborers shaking fundamentals of Japan.

ANTHRO 254B: Anthropology of Drugs: Experience, Capitalism, Modernity (ANTHRO 154, CSRE 154)

This course examines the significant role ¿drugs¿ play in shaping expressions of the self and social life; in the management populations, and in the production of markets and inequality. It engages these themes through cultural representations of drugs and drug use, analyses of scientific discourse, and social theory. Topics include: the social construction of the licit and illicit; the shifting boundaries of deviance, disease and pleasure; and the relationship between local markets and global wars.
Instructors: Garcia, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 255: Research Methods in Ecological Anthropology (ANTHRO 155)

The course prepare students for the methodological and practical aspects of doing ecologically oriented, quantitative anthropological field research. The primary goal is to explore what it means to ask anthropological questions in a systematic way. We will focus on understanding what can constitute an interesting question, how to frame a question in way that facilitates investigation, and how to design methods to begin investigating a question. In turn, the course will provide a format to refine research projects in preparation for doing more extensive fieldwork.
Instructors: Curran, L. (PI)

ANTHRO 260: Social and Environmental Sustainability: The Costa Rican Case (ANTHRO 160)

Seminar focused on issues of tropical sustainability with a particular emphasis on the Osa Peninsula of Costa Rica. Offered in conjunction with the Osa Initiative in the Wood¿s Institute for the Environment, the course highlights issues of human development in the tropics, through such means as agricultural development, ecotourism, conservation efforts, private and indigenous reserves, and mining. The course will draw from diverse disciplines including anthropology, rural sociology, conservation biology, geosciences, history, political science, and journalism. In addition to weekly discussions, students will development a research paper throughout the term which will be presented to a panel of selected Wood¿s Faculty during the final week of the term.
Instructors: Durham, W. (PI)

ANTHRO 260A: Tragedy of the Commons: Human Ecology of Communal Resources (ANTHRO 160A)

The ¿tragedy of the commons¿ is a classic social dilemma ¿ a situation in which individual interests conflict with collective ones ¿ and key to understanding past, present and future environmental degradation. This course surveys a variety of scientific perspectives on the essence of the tragedy: common property resources will ultimately be destroyed by overexploitation. Major themes include the effects of human population density and social organization on the health and management of commons, self-interest versus collective action, and potential solutions to commons problems. Modern and prehistoric case studies are examined from ecological and evolutionary perspectives.

ANTHRO 261A: Human Ecology: Adaptations to Climate and Climate Change (ANTHRO 161A)

Humans face essentially the same adaptive challenges as all organisms but are unique for having successfully adapted to virtually every environment on Earth. The resulting diversity of phenotypes and cultures¿past and present¿is key to understanding how interactions with environments shape the economic, social, and cultural lives of hunter-gatherers, pastoralists and agriculturalists. This course surveys the range of human adaptations from an ecological and evolutionary perspective to understand human adaptive capacity and vulnerability to climate change.
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