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231 - 240 of 390 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 180: Science, Technology, and Gender

Why is engineering often seen as a masculine profession? What have women's experiences been in entering fields of science and technology? How has gender been defined by scientists? Issues: the struggles of women in science to negotiate misogyny and cultural expectation (marriage, children), reproductive issues (surrogate motherhood, visual representations of the fetus, fetal surgery, breast feeding, childbirth practices), how the household became a site of consumerism and technology, and the cultural issues at stake as women join the ranks of scientists.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender

ANTHRO 182A: Down and Out: Marginal Lives and Institutional Technologies (ANTHRO 282A)

This course examines the neglect and management of socially marginalized persons including the mentally ill, youth runaways, child wards of the state, drug addicts and prisoners. In this course, we will approach the concept of marginality by investigating the spaces and institutions of decay, neglect and rehabilitation to which unwanted and indigent individuals are relegated. Readings are focused on qualitative research conducted within institutions of health, welfare, and reform. There will be two comparative public mental health sections in this course: one focused on South Asia and the second on Africa. This course is relevant for students interested in medical anthropology, applied anthropology, public health policy, or clinical careers in medicine, psychology, or social work.

ANTHRO 183B: Human Mobility and Adaptability (ANTHRO 283B)

Mobility, whether in the form of seasonal or permanent migration, is an ancient practice necessary for many subsistence strategies, including hunting-and-gathering and pastoralism. Many new forms of mobility have emerged and now it is nearly impossible to consider a patch of human society that is not engaged in or directly impacted by habitual, patterned geographic mobility. Today, almost everywhere in the world, people can get farther, faster; urbanization, environmental degradation, and civil unrest are driving groups of people who do not have a cultural tradition of nomadic migration to adopt a mobile lifestyle¿sometimes permanently, sometimes temporarily¿in search of new economic or resource opportunities. In this seminar course, we will explore modern patterns of human mobility and migration as adaptive strategies for predictably and unpredictably changing environments. Using a framework of biological and cultural adaptation, we will discuss the major types of current human mobility (e.g. nomadism, immigration, migrant labor, displacement) and how they influence and are influenced by social systems, resource access, and health.

ANTHRO 184: Spirituality and Healing (HUMBIO 179S)

The puzzle of symbolic healing. How have societies without the resources of modern medicine approached healing? Why do these rituals have common features around the world? Shamanism, spirit possession, prayer, and the role of placebos in modern biomedicine. Students do ethnographic work and practical explorations along with more traditional scholarly approaches to learning.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

ANTHRO 185: Medical Anthropology of Contemporary Africa (ANTHRO 285)

In this course we will examine the place of Africa in global health discourses while reading in-depth histories and ethnographies of the varied causes and consequences of some of the most difficult problems facing African countries today. We will study the effects of colonialism and conflict on health, explore the military and humanitarian connections in the fight against HIV/AIDS, weigh the risks and benefits of population genetic studies on African populations, examine biomedical interventions on, and erasures of, local health problems, and query the role of violence, memory, insecurity, and power in daily life on the continent.

ANTHRO 185A: Race and Biomedicine (ASNAMST 185A)

Race, identity, culture, biology, and political power in biomedicine. Biological theories of racial ordering, sexuality and the medicalization of group difference. Sources include ethnography, film, and biomedical literature. Topics include colonial history and medicine, the politics of racial categorization in biomedical research, the protection of human subjects and research ethics, immigration health and citizenship, race-based models in health disparities research and policy, and recent developments in human genetic variation research.

ANTHRO 187A: The Anthropology of Race, Nature, and Animality (CSRE 187A)

As recently as the 40s, the S, Africa government labeled indigenous San people part of the animal landscape. Using the San example as a starting point, course examines socially, culturally, and politically constructed ideas about race, animality, and nature in the cultural and geographic settings of N. America, Australia, and Africa. How connections between race and nature have served as terrains of power through which people and governments have claimed territories and justified violence. Classic texts by nature writers and philosophers and current social science works that focus on race and ethnicity. Concepts such as gender, sex, and nature; environmental tourism; natural resource development; and indigeneity and animality. How ideas about race and nature have come together around concepts such as the myth of wilderness and the violence of considering certain people to be less-than-human. Issues of environmental politics and activism.

ANTHRO 193: Anthropology Capstone: Contemporary Debates in Anthropology

Do you know what an anthropological perspective is? Can you describe some of the key assumptions and questions within the discipline? nA major in Anthropology is composed of many specialized courses in different tracks, different emphases and seemingly a never-ending multiplication of perspectives and ethnographies. However, Anthropology is also an ongoing intellectual conversation with foundational questions, some of longstanding and some new. These foundational questions have stimulated different responses and answers and thus have also led to constant renewal of the discipline in the midst of profound disagreement. In this Anthropology Capstone course students across tracks and emphases will address some of the critical debates that have been central to the discipline as it has developed. We will feature three debate questions in the class. Preparation for each debate will be through class discussion of critical readings as well as extra-mural reading and preparation with one¿s debating partners.

ANTHRO 199: Senior and Master's Paper Writing Workshop (ANTHRO 299)

Techniques of interpreting data, organizing bibliographic materials, writing, editing and revising. Preparation of papers for conferences and publications in anthropology. Seniors register for 199; master's students register for 299.
| Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Poggiali, L. (PI)

ANTHRO 200B: Lifeways of the Ancient Maya (ANTHRO 100B)

This course engages with the world of the pre- and post-contact Maya people through scholarship that explores the material culture of daily life. We address how questions about the past are framed through ethnographic and ethnohistoric accounts of daily life, how diverse scientific methods and theoretical perspectives are used to address these questions, and how interpretations of daily life in the ancient Maya world are formulated. We consider how perceptions of the ancient Maya are marshaled in contemporary politics and policies. The course is designed to provide a broad overview of sites and materials in the Maya area, focusing on the dynamic interplay between the material and the social. Students will create interpretive frameworks for a public audience as a component of the final project
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