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201 - 210 of 390 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 146A: Anthropology of Youth

This course will be a survey of classical texts and contemporary research on youth and generations. We will explore the historical and cultural construction of `youth¿ and youth practices across regions over time. We will pay special attention to the organization of contemporary capitalism, its effect in producing marginality and exclusion, and issues underlying youth political movements.

ANTHRO 146G: Paperwork (STS 200G)

"Paperwork" is an intensive reading course in a seminar format, concerning the production, circulation and mediation of "paperwork" both as a material and symbolic infrastructure for the operation of modern institutions and governance. We will explore diverse techniques and technologies of paperwork, including note-taking, memos, lists, files, and documents, and forms of paperwork such as medical record, petition, passport, ID card, immigration paper, as well as archives and other mnemonic technologies both as cultural practices and reflexive objects. The goal of the course is to understand "bureaucracy" in the fields of law, business, and public administration, as well as in civil society generally, from the vantage point of concrete inscription, circulation, and storage of papers and documents. Readings will include works by Bruno Latour, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Cornelia Vismann, Friedrich Kittler, and others.
Instructors: Inoue, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 149A: Cities and Citizens in the Middle East (URBANST 144)

This course will explore historical formation of cities and citizens in the Eastern Mediterranean since the 19th century.We will explore urban development, economy, social classes and local politics with a focus Egypt and Turkey and in particular two world-historical cities, Cairo and Istanbul. Drawing on history, cultural anthropology, geography and sociology disciplines, we will examine how urban space in Egypt and Turkey have reconfigured through histories of colonialism, nationalism, developmentalism and globalization. Rural to urban immigration, informality, gendered places, consumption, urban regeneration, local politics and branding the city will be the themes of our discussion. We will study these themes in relation to two main questions: How do spatial changes engender new social practices and redefine cultural difference?; How do power struggles at the intersection of local and global interests shape urban change? It will be of interest for urban studies majors and other students at all levels who would like to study urban struggles and change in Turkey, Egypt, the Middle East and the Global South.

ANTHRO 150A: Minaret and Mahallah: Women and Islam in Central Asia (FEMGEN 150A, REES 250A)

Introduction to women's culture and art in Muslim countries of Central Asia. Women, bearers of family rites and folklore, are the key figures in transmission of traditional culture and guardians of folk Islam. Women helped to keep the continuity of Islamic education in Central Asia during the harsh times of Communist dominance. The whole wealth of women's oral tradition will be demonstrated and examined to the extent possible. The course will make broad use of audio-visual materials.

ANTHRO 151A: Contemporary Chinese Society Through Independent Documentary Film (ANTHRO 251A)

An overview of social issues in contemporary China as seen through its emerging independent documentary film movement. Topics covered include representations of history, political power and accountability in the reform era, human rights, urbanization, the environment, homelessness and inequality, sexualities, addiction, and the role of media in society. Each viewing is accompanied by readings in media theory or the anthropological/sociological study of contemporary China. Can be taken with or without research component. Films include English subtitles.

ANTHRO 152A: Urban Poverty and Inequality in Contemporary China

Experiences of poverty and inequality and their relationship to gender, space development, post-socialism, and globalization. How processes of class-making in China's cities are bound up with transformations in the country's sociopolitcal landscape.

ANTHRO 153A: Population and social trends in Japan (ANTHRO 253A)

Anthropological theories and concepts as applied to Japan. Postwar demographic trends. Delayed marriage.  Declining nuclear family.  Re-structuring of education and workplace. Problems for the seniors.  Foreign laborers shaking fundamentals of Japan.

ANTHRO 154: Anthropology of Drugs: Experience, Capitalism, Modernity (ANTHRO 254B, CSRE 154)

This course examines the significant role ¿drugs¿ play in shaping expressions of the self and social life; in the management populations, and in the production of markets and inequality. It engages these themes through cultural representations of drugs and drug use, analyses of scientific discourse, and social theory. Topics include: the social construction of the licit and illicit; the shifting boundaries of deviance, disease and pleasure; and the relationship between local markets and global wars.
Instructors: Garcia, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 155: Research Methods in Ecological Anthropology (ANTHRO 255)

The course prepare students for the methodological and practical aspects of doing ecologically oriented, quantitative anthropological field research. The primary goal is to explore what it means to ask anthropological questions in a systematic way. We will focus on understanding what can constitute an interesting question, how to frame a question in way that facilitates investigation, and how to design methods to begin investigating a question. In turn, the course will provide a format to refine research projects in preparation for doing more extensive fieldwork.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
Instructors: Curran, L. (PI)

ANTHRO 160: Social and Environmental Sustainability: The Costa Rican Case (ANTHRO 260)

Seminar focused on issues of tropical sustainability with a particular emphasis on the Osa Peninsula of Costa Rica. Offered in conjunction with the Osa Initiative in the Wood¿s Institute for the Environment, the course highlights issues of human development in the tropics, through such means as agricultural development, ecotourism, conservation efforts, private and indigenous reserves, and mining. The course will draw from diverse disciplines including anthropology, rural sociology, conservation biology, geosciences, history, political science, and journalism. In addition to weekly discussions, students will development a research paper throughout the term which will be presented to a panel of selected Wood¿s Faculty during the final week of the term.
Instructors: Durham, W. (PI)
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