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171 - 180 of 390 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 127A: Cities and the Future: Utopias, Dystopias, and Other Urbanisms to Come

What sort of futures are being imagined for the cities of the twenty-first century? An interdisciplinary seminar, this course will critically analyze how the future of cities, and the cities of the future, are being thought about and acted upon in the present. It is designed for graduate students and advanced undergraduates with experience in the social sciences and humanities and who also have a keen interest in urban studies. Its primary objective is to develop sophisticated ways of thinking about the future of cities, since doing so has real significance for the kind of city we want to, and eventually will, ourselves inhabit.

ANTHRO 130A: Interpreting Space and Place: An Introduction to Mapmaking

How mapmaking, geographical information systems (GIS), and spatial tools can be applied in social research. Qualitative and quantitative approaches in the use of geospatial information. Methodologies and case examples.

ANTHRO 130B: Introduction to GIS in Anthropology (ANTHRO 230B)

How GIS and spatial tools can be applied in social research. Case studies and student projects address questions of social and cultural relevance using real data sets, including the collection of geospatial data and building of spatial evidence. Analytical approaches and how they can shape a social and cultural interpretation of space and place.

ANTHRO 131: Genes and Identity (AFRICAAM 131, CSRE 131)

In recent decades genes have increasingly become endowed with the cultural power to explain many aspects of human life: physical traits, diseases, behaviors, ancestral histories, and identity. In this course we will explore a deepening societal intrigue with genetic accounts of personal identity and political meaning. Students will engage with varied interdisciplinary sources that range from legal cases to scientific articles, medical ethics guidelines, films, and ethnographies. We will explore several case studies where the use of DNA markers (either as proof of heritage or disease risk) has spawned cultural movements that are biosocial in nature. nnExamples include legal and political analyses of African ancestry testing as ¿evidence¿ in slavery reparations cases, debates on whether Black Freedman should be allowed into the Cherokee and Seminole Nations, considerations on whether people with genetic links to Jewish groups should have a right of return to Israel, close readings of The U.S. Food and Drug Administration¿s crackdown on personal genomics testing companies (such as 23andMe), examinations of genetic identity politics in health disparities funding and orphan disease research, inquiries into new social movements organized around gene-based definitions of personhood, and civil liberties concerns about genetic ¿familial searching¿ in forensic databases that disproportionately target specific minority groups as criminal suspects. nnStudents will engage in a short observational ¿pilot¿ ethnographic project that allows them to further explore issues from the course for their final paper.

ANTHRO 132B: Islam Law in Muslim and Non-Muslim Societies

In this course, students will engage with scholarly material that demonstrates the multiple and varying ways in which Islam is invoked as a legal discourse in Muslim and Non- Muslim societies. In this course, we look at Islam not merely as being in the domain of legislation and adjudication, but as a cultural object; an important signifier in politics, for the state to enforce itself, as well as a technology for people¿s strategic use. The point of this course is therefore to consider how Islam operates in legal contexts as a 1) discourse of power and of strategy (at personal and political levels) and 2) as a discourse of identity that concerns issues of ethics, rights, gender, kinship, class and nation.
Instructors: Ghani, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 133A: Anthropology of the Middle East (CSRE 133A)

This course examines social, political, and religious dimensions of various Middle Eastern societies. Key topics include the development of the modern nation-state, the Islamic revival, human rights, and discourses of democracy. Course materials include ethnographic studies, novels, and films, which provide a rich contextualization of social life and cultural politics in the region.

ANTHRO 133B: Covering Islam: On What We Learn to See, Think and Hear about Islam & Muslims (AFRICAST 133B, CSRE 133B)

In this course, students will think critically about how knowledge about Islam, Muslims, and Muslim Societies is produced and circulated. As a class, we will consider why and how certain kinds of ideas about Islam and Muslims become representative (i.e., authoritative discourse) while others ideas do not. This is an interdisciplinary class; course material will draw on readings from anthropology, literary criticism, history, sociology and media and cultural studies. We will also be engaging with other kinds of material, including news articles, editorials, documentaries, and films.
Instructors: Ghani, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 134: Object Lessons (ANTHRO 234)

Human-object relations in the processes of world making. Objectification and materiality through ethnography, archaeology, material culture studies, and cultural studies. Interpretive connotations around and beyond the object, the unstable terrain of interrelationships between sociality and materiality, and the cultural constitution of objects. Sources include: works by Marx, Hegel, and Mauss; classic Pacific ethnographies of exchange, circulation, alienability, and fetishism; and material culture studies.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

ANTHRO 134B: Conflict and Change in the Middle East

Following the Arab Spring, the hope for political and social change has been widely raised and celebrated in the Middle East. This hope, however, has been shattered alongside the recent cycles of violence and conflict in different parts of the region, from Syria and Iraq to Egypt. This course examines political violence, change, and boundary making in the modern Middle East. By taking a historical and anthropological look at the political conflict and change, this course will explore how particular political, economic, and social narratives, encounters, and contradictions have accompanied the conflict and change in the region. The course will focus on the cases from Turkey, Iraq, Syria, Iran, Egypt, Morocco, and Israel/Palestine.

ANTHRO 135: Cultural Studies (ANTHRO 235)

Identity, community, and culture; their interactions and formation.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
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