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111 - 120 of 390 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 31: Ecology, Evolution, and Human Health

Ecology, Evolution, and Human Health Human ecology, environments, adaptation and plasticity, and their relationship to health and well-being considered in the broad comparative context. Topics include human population history, subsistence ecology, demography, reproductive decision making, urbanization, migration, infectious disease, the physiology of stress and the inflammatory response, social capital and social networks, nutrition, nutritional deficiencies, growth, and social inequalities. No prior course work in ecological or medical anthropology required.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom

ANTHRO 335A: Animism and Alter-Native Modernities (FRENCH 335A, REES 335A)

For many years indigenous knowledges were treated as a field of research for anthropologists and as "mistaken epistemologies," i. e., unscientific and irrational folklore and childish worldviews. This old view of animism was a product of the evolutionist and anthropocentric worldview of the Enlightenment. However within the framework of ecological humanities, current interest in posthumanism, postsecularism and discussions on building altermodernity (Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri), indigenous thought is used to critique modern epistemology and develop an alternative to the Western worldview. Treating native thought as an equivalent to Western knowledge is presented as a decolonizing and liberating practice. The term alter-native modernities as response to the challenges of Euromodernity and suggests modernities that might emerge out of indigenous ways of being in the world. Comparison between literature on indigenous cultures from Latin America and from Russia (animism in Amazonia and Siberia). Following recent works by anthropologists and archaeologists such as Nurit Bird-Rose, Philippe Descola, Graham Harvey, Tim Ingold and Viveiros de Castro, new animism is treated as an alternative (relational) ontology that allows rethinking the problem of matter and agency, goes beyond human exeptionalism and embraces non-humans. Topics include: alternative and alter-native modernities; Jean Piaget's theory of childhood animism; problem of anthropomorphism and personification; indigenous knowledge and the problem of epistemic violence; vitalist materialism (Jane Bennett, Rosi Braidotti); connectedness as the principle of life (relational epistemologies and ontologies); non-human agency (Bruno Latour).
Instructors: Domanska, E. (PI)

ANTHRO 363: Demography and Life History Theory

Problems in demography and theoretical population biology applied to human systems. Emphasis is on establishing relationships between models in theoretical population biology and empirical demographic methodology. Topics include philosophy of models and model building, population dynamics, stable population theory, species interactions in human ecology, models of infectious diseases and their control, cultural evolution. Prerequisites: HUMBIO 137 or consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 377: The Mystery of Ministry: What is Authority?

Why do people obey others in the absence of explicit coercion? Why do people accept some leaders but not others? What does it mean to say something or someone has authority? Is authority personal or institutional? Why do people believe in the Pope? Why do people believe some objects have power and others not? Is charisma only a perfume? Can institutions wield charismatic power? These are questions that from Max Weber onwards classical and contemporary anthropologists and sociologists continue to ask.nnIn returning to (Weberian) questions of authority and legitimacy this course takes a question posed by Bourdieu ¿ what is the mystery of ministry? We will apply the question of authority broadly, not just in the explicitly political realm but also to understand, for example, how (culturally specific) charismatic and sacral authority can be fashioned through persons and through objects (eg. relics). The course will thus move between interrelated religious, moral, and political notions to try to generate some critical questions for how a contemporary anthropology that explicitly (rather than implicitly) re-addresses authority might look.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5

ANTHRO 380: Practice and Performance: Bourdieu, Butler, Giddens, de Certeau

Poststructuralist theories of iteration and mimesis used by social scientists to negotiate the tension between social structure and social practice: Gidden's structuration theory; Bourdieu's practice theory; Butler's theories of gender performativity; and de Certeau's analysis of tactics and strategies. Ethnographic and archaeological case studies that employ methodologies inspired by these approaches. Intersections and contradictions between these theorists' work; their use in anthropological practice. Issues of gender, sexuality, and ethnicity. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 42: Megacities

In this course we will examine the meaning, processes, and challenges of urbanization. Through a series of targeted readings across history and geography and through the study of varied means of representation (anthropology, literature, cartography, film, etc), the class will analyze the ways in which urban forms have come into being and created, met, and/or ignored challenges such as disease, water, transport, religious and class conflict, colonialism, labor, and trade. Students will read anthropology in conjunction with other disciplines (literature, urban planning, public health, architecture, and economics) to learn the ways in which ethnographies of immigration, urban poverty, class disparity, economic development and indicators, noise, and transportation substantively augment our understandings of how people live within globalization.
Instructors: Jain, S. (PI)

ANTHRO 440: Teaching Assistantship

Supervised experience as assistant in one undergraduate course.
| Repeatable for credit

ANTHRO 444: Anthropology Colloquium

Department Colloquia Lecture Series. Lectures presented on a variety of anthropological topics. Colloquium is intended for the Department of Anthropology's under graduate majors and graduate students. May be repeated for credit.
| Repeatable for credit

ANTHRO 451: Directed Individual Study

Supervised work for a qualifying paper, examination, or project with an individual faculty member.
| Repeatable for credit

ANTHRO 54A: Central Asia Through Films: A Weekly 3-Hour Seminar (REES 54A)

Through films this course explores major issues of contemporary peoples of Central Asia while learning fundamental concepts in cultural anthropology. In this seminar we will consider a wide range of examples, including first of all the new feature films, which will be used as a window into the modern reality and therefore could be served in a certain sense as anthropological fieldwork data. Films are prearranged by the instructor according to certain thematic subjects for in-class discussions.
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