2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

101 - 110 of 390 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 26N: God and the Supernatural

This course explores the conditions under which people have experiences that they identify as "supernatural": experiences of something that is not physically present. We will explore the cultural and psychological dimensions of this very real phenomenon. We will not, however, make ontological judgments about whether something which is experienced as externally present is in fact externally present: in other words, this is a class about culture and psychology, not about metaphysics. We will do experimental work, using our selves and fellow classmates, as subjects, to understand who, when and how people have experiences that they deem "supernatural."

ANTHRO 270: Australian Ecosystems: Human Dimensions and Environmental Dynamics (ANTHRO 170, EARTHSYS 172)

This cross-disciplinary course surveys the history and prehistory of human ecological dynamics in Australia, drawing on geology, climatology, archaeology, geography, ecology and anthropology to understand the mutual dynamic relationships between the continent and its inhabitants. Topics include anthropogenic fire and fire ecology, animal extinctions, aridity and climate variability, colonization and spread of Homo sapiens, invasive species interactions, changes in human subsistence and mobility throughout the Pleistocene and Holocene as read through the archaeological record, the totemic geography and social organization of Aboriginal people at the time of European contact, the ecological and geographical aspects of the "Dreamtime", and contemporary issues of policy relative to Aboriginal land tenure and management.
Instructors: Bird, R. (PI)

ANTHRO 271: The Biology and Evolution of Language (ANTHRO 171, HUMBIO 145L)

Lecture course surveying the biology, linguistic functions, and evolution of the organs of speech and speech centers in the brain, language in animals and humans, the evolution of language itself, and the roles of innateness vs. culture in language. Suitable both for general education and as preparation for further studies in anthropology, biology, linguistics, medicine, psychology, and speech & language therapy. Anthropology concentration: CS, EE. No prerequisites.

ANTHRO 275: Human Skeletal Anatomy (ANTHRO 175, BIO 174, BIO 274, HUMBIO 180)

Study of the human skeleton (a. k. a. human osteology), as it bears on other disciplines, including medicine, forensics, archaeology, and paleoanthropology (human evolution). Basic bone biology, anatomy, and development, emphasizing hands-on examination and identification of human skeletal parts, their implications for determining an individual¿s age, sex, geographic origin, and health status, and for the evolutionary history of our species. Three hours of lecture and at least three hours of supervised and independent study in the lab each week.
Instructors: Klein, R. (PI)

ANTHRO 277: Environmental Change and Emerging Infectious Diseases (ANTHRO 177, HUMBIO 114)

The changing epidemiological environment. How human-induced environmental changes, such as global warming, deforestation and land-use conversion, urbanization, international commerce, and human migration, are altering the ecology of infectious disease transmission, and promoting their re-emergence as a global public health threat. Case studies of malaria, cholera, hantavirus, plague, and HIV.

ANTHRO 27N: Ethnicity and Violence: Anthropological Perspectives

Ethnicity is one of the most compelling and most modern ways in which people - in the midst of considerable global and local uncertainty - all across the world imagine and narrate themselves. This seminar will take an anthropological look at both the modernity and the compulsions of ethnic allegiance, and, why struggles over ethnic identity are so frequently violent. Our questions will be both historical ¿ how, why and when did people come to think of themselves as possessing different ethnic identities - and contemporary ¿ how are these identities lived, understood, narrated, and transformed and what is the consequence of such ethnicisation. We follow this through anthropological perspectives which ask persistently how people themselves locally narrate and act upon their experiences and histories. Through this we will approach some of the really big and yet everyday questions that many of us around the world face: how do we relate to ourselves and to those we define as others; and how do we live through and after profound violence? The seminar will take these larger questions through a global perspective focusing on cases from Rwanda and Burundi, India, Sri Lanka, Northern Ireland, Guatemala, and the countries of Former Yugoslavia among others. These cases cover a broad canvas of issues from questions of historicity, racial purity, cultural holism, and relations to the state, to contests over religious community, indigeneity, minority identities, globalization, gender, and generation.

ANTHRO 282: Medical Anthropology (ANTHRO 82, HUMBIO 176A)

Emphasis is on how health, illness, and healing are understood, experienced, and constructed in social, cultural, and historical contexts. Topics: biopower and body politics, gender and reproductive technologies, illness experiences, medical diversity and social suffering, and the interface between medicine and science.
Instructors: Kohrman, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 286: Culture and Madness (ANTHRO 186)

'Madness' lends insight into the construction of the normal and abnormal; the boundaries of reason and unreason; the epistemological relation of mind and body, and the management of difference and disease. Taking an interdisciplinary perspective, this course explores the fundamental questions madness poses to subjectivity, culture and modernity.
Instructors: Garcia, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 304: Data Analysis for Quantitative Research

Univariate, multivariate, and graphical methods used for analyzing quantitative data in anthropological research. Archaeological and paleobiological examples. Recommended: algebra. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Instructors: Jones, J. (PI)

ANTHRO 308: Proposal Writing Seminar in Cultural and Social Anthropology

Required of second-year Ph.D. students in the culture and society track. The conceptualization of dissertation research problems, the theories behind them, and the methods for exploring them. Participants draft a research prospectus suitable for a dissertation proposal and research grant applications. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Instructors: Kohrman, M. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints