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191 - 200 of 488 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 155: Research Methods in Ecological Anthropology (ANTHRO 255)

The course prepare students for the methodological and practical aspects of doing ecologically oriented, quantitative anthropological field research. The primary goal is to explore what it means to ask anthropological questions in a systematic way. We will focus on understanding what can constitute an interesting question, how to frame a question in way that facilitates investigation, and how to design methods to begin investigating a question. In turn, the course will provide a format to refine research projects in preparation for doing more extensive fieldwork.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

ANTHRO 156: Japanese Anthropology (ANTHRO 256)

This is an advanced reading seminar in the field of Japanses Anthropology. nIt will explore the historical development of the field and the contemporary issues and topics taken up by scholars of Japanese anthropology. Prior knowledge of Japanese language, history, and, society is required.
Last offered: Spring 2019

ANTHRO 156B: Environment, Nature and Race (CSRE 156J)

Environment, nature and race: Politics of belonging, exclusion, and embodiment. Scientific and popular understandings of race and ethnicity remain deeply entangled with ideas about "nature" and the "environment". This course will introduce students to some of the many ways that nature, environment, and race have been and remain intertwined, for better or for worse. What does it mean to claim race is "natural"? To what extent is race shaped by environment and vice versa? How are the politics of race linked to the politics of environmentalism? The class will begin with a brief treatment of current critical consensus on the biology of race and the cultural politics of race and nature, and move on to a theoretical discussion of how humans and "nature" interact. From there, the course moves into historical and ethnographic examples of the politics of race and the environment: the racialized and racializing character of particular environments; the ways that racial politics shape natural environments; and the politics of exclusion and belonging in environmental movements. Case studies will be both rural and urban and draw from anthropology, geography, history, and biology. The course will end by considering the recent resurgence of the race concept in biology.
Last offered: Spring 2015

ANTHRO 157: Japanese Popular Culture (ANTHRO 257)

This seminar focuses on the intersection between politics and popular culture in contemporary Japan. It will survey a range of social and political implications of practices of popular culture. Topics include J-pop, manga, anime, and other popular visual cultures, as well as social media. Students will be introduced to theories of popular culture in general, and a variety of contemporary anthropological studies on Japanese popular culture in particular. Prior knowledge of cultural anthropology is required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Inoue, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 158: The Anthropology of Social Class (ANTHRO 258)

Course introduces social theory concepts and paradigms for the understanding of class. It then extends and revises those concepts and paradigms by considering anthropological approaches in different cultural and historical settings that consider the entanglements of class with other social hierarchies, especially race, caste, and ideas of "civilization" and "development".
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Ferguson, J. (PI)

ANTHRO 159C: Ecological Humanities (ANTHRO 259C, DLCL 259C, REES 259C)

What sort of topics, research questions, approaches, theories and concepts lead to an integration of various kinds of knowledges? Ecological Humanities provides a conceptual platform for a merger of humanities and social sciences with earth and life sciences, soil science and forensic sciences. The course will discuss such selected topics as the Anthropocene, geologic/mineral and exhumed subjects/personae, bio- and geosocial collectives, symbiotic life-forms, non-human agencies, and forensic landscapes as examples of this merger.
Last offered: Spring 2018

ANTHRO 160: Social and Environmental Sustainability: The Costa Rican Case (ANTHRO 260)

Seminar focused on issues of tropical sustainability with a particular emphasis on the Osa Peninsula of Costa Rica. Offered in conjunction with the Osa Initiative in the Wood¿s Institute for the Environment, the course highlights issues of human development in the tropics, through such means as agricultural development, ecotourism, conservation efforts, private and indigenous reserves, and mining. The course will draw from diverse disciplines including anthropology, rural sociology, conservation biology, geosciences, history, political science, and journalism. In addition to weekly discussions, students will development a research paper throughout the term which will be presented to a panel of selected Wood¿s Faculty during the final week of the term.
Last offered: Spring 2015

ANTHRO 160A: Tragedy of the Commons: Human Ecology of Communal Resources (ANTHRO 260A)

The ¿tragedy of the commons¿ is a classic social dilemma ¿ a situation in which individual interests conflict with collective ones ¿ and key to understanding past, present and future environmental degradation. This course surveys a variety of scientific perspectives on the essence of the tragedy: common property resources will ultimately be destroyed by overexploitation. Major themes include the effects of human population density and social organization on the health and management of commons, self-interest versus collective action, and potential solutions to commons problems. Modern and prehistoric case studies are examined from ecological and evolutionary perspectives.
Last offered: Spring 2013

ANTHRO 161A: Human Ecology: Adaptations to Climate and Climate Change (ANTHRO 261A)

Humans face essentially the same adaptive challenges as all organisms but are unique for having successfully adapted to virtually every environment on Earth. The resulting diversity of phenotypes and cultures¿past and present¿is key to understanding how interactions with environments shape the economic, social, and cultural lives of hunter-gatherers, pastoralists and agriculturalists. This course surveys the range of human adaptations from an ecological and evolutionary perspective to understand human adaptive capacity and vulnerability to climate change.
Last offered: Autumn 2012

ANTHRO 162: Indigenous Peoples and Environmental Problems (ANTHRO 262)

The social and cultural consequences of contemporary environmental problems. The impact of market economies, development efforts, and conservation projects on indigenous peoples, emphasizing Latin America. The role of indigenous grass roots organizations in combating environmental destruction and degradation of homeland areas.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom
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