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101 - 110 of 483 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 117B: Monuments and Landscapes: An Archaeological Perspective (ANTHRO 217B, ARCHLGY 117B)

The landscape is a result of the action and interaction of human and natural factors. Communities have altered their landscapes for a variety of reasons, including the subsistence practices; as a consequence of economic growth; to express a social ideology, and as a consequence of political and religious drivers. Accordingly, landscapes enable physical and provide psychological sustenance to people, and the human need to relate to our surroundings is part of the way in which identities are created and disputed. Within the humanities, landscape is being conceptualized as a process, a practice and as performance, and monuments within a given landscape have an equally important role, not to mention history. They are often the most durable and well-known evidence of the ancient civilizations, and should be observed jointly with the landscape. How did the landscape predefine the monument and how did the monument complement, emphasize or devalue the landscape? What philosophy channeled the c more »
The landscape is a result of the action and interaction of human and natural factors. Communities have altered their landscapes for a variety of reasons, including the subsistence practices; as a consequence of economic growth; to express a social ideology, and as a consequence of political and religious drivers. Accordingly, landscapes enable physical and provide psychological sustenance to people, and the human need to relate to our surroundings is part of the way in which identities are created and disputed. Within the humanities, landscape is being conceptualized as a process, a practice and as performance, and monuments within a given landscape have an equally important role, not to mention history. They are often the most durable and well-known evidence of the ancient civilizations, and should be observed jointly with the landscape. How did the landscape predefine the monument and how did the monument complement, emphasize or devalue the landscape? What philosophy channeled the construction of the monuments within the landscapes? Whether ephemeral or permanent, the human agency left traces in the landscape; thus, both monuments and landscapes are the key indicators for understanding the ideology of a particular culture. Archaeology, through its interdisciplinary nature, provides a unique perspective, as well as tools, for examining the formation processes of all man-made elements, within both natural and cultural landscapes. nnThe course will address the multifaceted issues of the ways that people have consciously and unconsciously shaped the land around them through time. It will look into diverse, geographically and periodically influenced concepts of a monument and landscape. The course will be divided into two parts, with the first one covering the theory and methodological approaches and the second part the conceptual characteristics, modifications and changeability in various archaeological and historical periods and cultural frameworks.
Last offered: Spring 2016

ANTHRO 117C: Global Heritage: Conflict, Reconciliation, and Diplomacy (ARCHLGY 105)

Archaeological studies from the 1990s framed cultural heritage as a resource that created attachments to place and to the past as a means to buttress national and cultural identities. But heritage can no longer be viewed as simply a marker of a singular, national identity. As a global era ushers in new regimes of heritage management, heritage becomes embroiled in a multitude of interactions whether acting as a fulcrum of transnational governance or functioning at the crux of community empowered utilizations and initiatives.nnThis course will trace what happens to heritage as it has been drawn into a world of global interactions while also maintaining more local forms of attachment. The class will address three themes (conflict, reconciliation, and diplomacy), all of which result from the multi-scalar relations that emerge from heritage financing, management, and preservation in a transnational arena. While the class will discuss cases that include both tangible and intangible heritage, more »
Archaeological studies from the 1990s framed cultural heritage as a resource that created attachments to place and to the past as a means to buttress national and cultural identities. But heritage can no longer be viewed as simply a marker of a singular, national identity. As a global era ushers in new regimes of heritage management, heritage becomes embroiled in a multitude of interactions whether acting as a fulcrum of transnational governance or functioning at the crux of community empowered utilizations and initiatives.nnThis course will trace what happens to heritage as it has been drawn into a world of global interactions while also maintaining more local forms of attachment. The class will address three themes (conflict, reconciliation, and diplomacy), all of which result from the multi-scalar relations that emerge from heritage financing, management, and preservation in a transnational arena. While the class will discuss cases that include both tangible and intangible heritage, the focus of the course will center around tangible elements of the past, including heritage sites and archaeological artifacts. Combining readings from the field of international relations, archaeology, and heritage studies, the class will question if and how heritage can be used in local settings while also producing international exchanges.
Last offered: Winter 2019

ANTHRO 118A: Digital Heritage: Bringing the Past Online with the Chinese American Historical Museum (ASNAMST 118A, CSRE 118A)

Interpreting the past is no longer just for people like historians and archaeologists, and it¿s no longer confined to the pages of books. More and more, community-based organizations are gathering stories and perspectives from everyday people, and they¿re putting them out for the world to see online. With these big changes, what will be the future of thinking about the past? In this course, students will work through the dynamics of digital heritage through readings, discussion, and original research. The course centers around artifacts unearthed at the Market Street Chinatown in San Jose. Each student will analyze and gather stories relating to a single artifact in order to contribute to a multimedia exhibit for the Chinese American Historical Museum in San Jose. Class time will be devoted both to discussion and to work on artifact-based projects, and will also include a fieldtrip to the museum and collaboration time with members of the Chinese Historical and Cultural Project.
Last offered: Winter 2014

ANTHRO 118C: Heritage Development in the Global South (ARCHLGY 116)

Heritage is a site of both promise and contestation in the Global South. These nations use it for a wide range of purposes: Peru¿s thriving tourism sector rests on a basis of heritage attractions, South Africa negotiates a post-apartheid identity through heritage, and India places increasing numbers of sites on the World Heritage List. Outlining different modes of heritage production and interpretation, this class investigates heritage regimes on scales ranging from local communities and national governance to international recognition. We will examine the role of heritage in building communities and identity; the place of heritage within economic development; the efforts of Global South countries to negotiate the legacies of colonialism and global inequality through managing their pasts; and the deployment of heritage as part of international power struggles within worldwide structures like UNESCO. Drawing on anthropology, heritage studies, and archaeology, students will gain a deeper understanding of how heritage is used by Global South countries to produce identity, support development, domesticate the past, and build the future.
Last offered: Winter 2019

ANTHRO 119: Zooarchaeology: An Introduction to Faunal Remains (ANTHRO 219, ARCHLGY 119)

As regularly noted, whether historic or pre-historic, animal bones are often the most commonly occurring artefacts on archaeological sites. As bioarchaeological samples, they offer the archaeologist an insight into food culture, provisioning, trade and the social aspects of human-animal interactions. The course will be taught through both practical and lecture sessions: the `hands-on¿ component is an essential complement to the lectures. The lectures will offer grounding in the main methodological approaches developed, as well as provide case-studies to illustrate where and how the methods have been applied. The practical session will walk students through the skeletal anatomy of a range of species. It will guide students on the identification of different parts of the animal, how to age / sex individuals, as well as recognize taphonomic indicators and what these mean to reconstructing post-depositional modifications.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

ANTHRO 119B: Tech Ethics and Ethnography: the human in human-computer interaction

Do machines have culture? How do engineers write themselves into their products? Can we better anticipate the unexpected and unwanted consequences of technologies?nnTaking as its point of departure the discipline of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), which examines the design and use of computer technology, this course shifts the focus to the humans creating and utilizing the technology. It invites us to think about computer science and social science together and learn how ethnographic methods can be utilized for ethical thinking and design in technology. This course will combine rigorous theoretical thinking with hands-on in-the-field research. Students will devise and engage in their own ethnographic research projects. This course will be of interest to students from a wide range of disciplines, including: computer science, engineering, medicine, anthropology, sociology, and the humanities. Our aim is to have a truly interdisciplinary and open-ended discussion about one of the most pressing social issues of our time, while giving students skills-based training in qualitative methods.
Last offered: Spring 2019

ANTHRO 120: The Maya

Lecture course on the ancient and modern Maya. We explore the archaeology, ecology, culture, and language history of the Maya from the earliest times to the Classic Maya Collapse in the 9th-10th Centuries A.D., and examine also the Post-Classic, the Conquest, and Colonial Periods, and the persistence and impact of the Maya in present-day Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, Honduras, El Salvador, and diasporic Maya in the United States. The course acquaints students with the cultural achievements of the Maya in the context of the anthropology and archaeology of civilization, and considers issues of identity over vast periods of time. It includes discussion of the roles of isolation, contact, and geography in Maya history; principles of archaeological excavation and interpretation as applied to the Maya city-states, especially to their rise and fall; Maya hieroglyphic writing and its decipherment; Maya mythology and the Popol Vuh; Maya art in its Mesoamerican context; ethical issues in the management of Maya archaeological sites; principles of ethnographic analysis as applied in modern Maya communities, and Maya rebellions against colonial and modern states. Anthropology concentration: CS, Arch. No prerequisites.
Last offered: Spring 2017

ANTHRO 120B: Indian Popular Culture

This course will explore key topics in contemporary India through an analysis of its popular culture. Bollywood and Kollywood films, Hindi soap operas and reality shows, vernacular music in Bihar, Tamil pulp fiction, matchboxes from Bangalore, clothing styles of Kerala college students, advertising in Mumbai, and cell phones used in Varanasi will all be brought together to help us shape an image of India as complex, contested, and changing. As an anthropology course, we will focus on the consumption of these media and discuss what they do in the world. Looking at both the source material itself and the way in which it is used, we will explore topics such as: nationalism, gender and sexuality, middle class aspiration, globalization, neoliberal consumerism, and the postcolonial condition.
Last offered: Winter 2015

ANTHRO 120F: Buying Black: Economic Sovereignty, Race, and Entrepreneurship in the USA (AFRICAAM 120F, CSRE 120F)

This seminar examines how communities of color have critiqued and transformed capitalism in America through concepts of economic independence, entrepreneurship, and sovereignty. By tracing concepts such as the double-duty dollar, casino/tribal capitalisms, retail boycotts, and buying black, the course traces ethnic entrepreneurialism in America. Students will also consider the international context of such US-based movements, particularly in relation to American imperialism and global supply-chain capitalism.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 121: Language and Prehistory (ANTHRO 221)

Language classification and its implications for human prehistory. The role of linguistic data in analyzing prehistoric populations, cultures, contact, and migrations. Comparison of linguistic and biological classifications. Reconstruction, proto-vocabularies, and culture. Archaeological decipherment and the origins and evolution of writing. Archaeological and genetic evidence for human migrations. (DA-A; HEF II,III)
Last offered: Winter 2016 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom
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