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81 - 90 of 485 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 110: Environmental Archaeology (ANTHRO 210, ARCHLGY 110)

This course investigates the field of environmental archaeology. Its goals are twofold: 1) to critically consider the intellectual histories of environmental archaeology, and, 2) to survey the various techniques and methods by which archaeologists assess historical environmental conditions through material proxies. The course will include lab activities.
Last offered: Spring 2018

ANTHRO 110A: Neandertals and Modern Humans: Origin, Evolution, Interactions (ANTHRO 210A)

The expansion out of Africa of our species represents the last spectacular step in the course of Human Evolution. It resulted in the colonization of the whole planet and the replacement of archaic forms of humans in Eurasia. One way to investigate why Homo sapiens has been such a successful species is to compare its evolution with that of its closest relative, the Neandertals. Exploring the bio-cultural processes at work in the two lineages leads to examine some of the main issues in Paleoanthropology and the most recent methodological advances in the field.
Last offered: Winter 2011

ANTHRO 110B: Examining Ethnographies (ANTHRO 210B)

Eight or nine important ethnographies, including their construction, their impact, and their faults and virtues.
Last offered: Winter 2019

ANTHRO 111: Archaeology of Gender and Sexuality (ARCHLGY 129, FEMGEN 119)

How archaeologists study sex, sexuality, and gender through the material remains left behind by past cultures and communities. Theoretical and methodological issues; case studies from prehistoric and historic archaeology.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Voss, B. (PI)

ANTHRO 111A: Archaeology of the Andes of Argentina (ANTHRO 211A)

The aim of this course is to provide a panorama of the archaeology of the andean region of Argentina, along some main topics of past and current researches. North andean Argentina has been considered for a long time as subordinated to the major developments in the central Andes and Puna, as if it were in a marginal position that mirrored their history. More than a hundred years of research in the area have produced different insights, which put that affirmation in relative terms. nThe course will give an overview of major historical contributions and contemporary trends in the archaeological thinking in relation to themes such as time, the space, people, things and nature. An overview of the conceptions and construction of time. Space seen as cultural area; natural environment and built landscape; archaeological areas as national territory. Historical conceptions of people; bodies; social inequality; the past and present others in the archaeological research. Artefacts, classifications more »
The aim of this course is to provide a panorama of the archaeology of the andean region of Argentina, along some main topics of past and current researches. North andean Argentina has been considered for a long time as subordinated to the major developments in the central Andes and Puna, as if it were in a marginal position that mirrored their history. More than a hundred years of research in the area have produced different insights, which put that affirmation in relative terms. nThe course will give an overview of major historical contributions and contemporary trends in the archaeological thinking in relation to themes such as time, the space, people, things and nature. An overview of the conceptions and construction of time. Space seen as cultural area; natural environment and built landscape; archaeological areas as national territory. Historical conceptions of people; bodies; social inequality; the past and present others in the archaeological research. Artefacts, classifications and typologies; material archaeological contexts as cultural units; from artefacts to things; past ontologies. Nature and environment; domestication; ecological approaches; agropastoralism; nature/culture. nIt is expected that by the end of the course students will gain a panorama of the major problems of the archaeology of andean Argentina with historically and theoretically informed perspectives.
Last offered: Winter 2013

ANTHRO 111C: Muwekma: Landscape Archaeology and the Narratives of California Natives (ARCHLGY 111B, NATIVEAM 111B)

This course explores the unique history of San Francisco Bay Area tribes with particular attention to Muwekma Ohlone- the descendent community associated with the landscape surrounding and including Stanford University. The story of Muwekma provides a window into the history of California Indians from prehistory to Spanish exploration and colonization, the role of Missionaries and the controversial legacy of Junipero Serra, Indigenous rebellions throughout California, citizenship and land title during the 19th century, the historical role of anthropology and archaeology in shaping policy and recognition of Muwekma, and the fight for acknowledgement of Muwekma as a federally recognized tribe. We will visit local sites associated with this history and participate in field surveys of the landscape of Muwekma.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Wilcox, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 112: Public Archaeology: Market Street Chinatown Archaeology Project (ANTHRO 212, ASNAMST 112)

This internship-style course centers on the practice and theory of historical archaeology research and interpretation through a focused study of San Jose's historic Chinese communities. The course includes classroom lectures, seminar discussion, laboratory analysis of historic artifacts, and participation in public archaeology events. Course themes include immigration, urbanization, material culture, landscape, transnational identities, race and ethnicity, gender, cultural resource management, public history, and heritage politics. The course includes required lab sections, field trips, and public service. Transportation will be provided for off-site activities.
Last offered: Summer 2014 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED

ANTHRO 112A: Archaeology of Human Rights (URBANST 147)

This introductory seminar provides a critical vantage point about human rights discourse from an archaeological perspective. The seminar is organized around four main questions: (1) Is cultural heritage a human right? (2) What are archaeologists learning about how the material and temporal dimensions of power and resistance? (3) How is archaeological evidence being used in investigations of human rights violations? (4) Can research about the past shape the politics of the present? Topics to be discussed include archaeological research on mass internment, colonialism, enslavement and coerced labor, ethnic cleansing, homelessness, gender discrimination, indigenous rights, and environmental justice.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | Repeatable for credit

ANTHRO 112B: Advanced Study in Public Archaeology

This service-learning course is offered only to students who have completed Anthro 112a and wish to deepen their scholarship in public archaeology and heritage practice through continued study. Students enrolled in Anthro 112b complete readings, collections management study, public archaeology events, and community-based research oriented towards their specific interests.nPrerequisite: Completion of Anthro 112a AND instructor consent
Last offered: Spring 2013 | Repeatable for credit

ANTHRO 113: Culture and Epigenetics: Towards A Non-Darwinian Synthesis (ANTHRO 213, ARCHLGY 113)

The course examines the impact of new research in epigenetics on our understanding of long-term cultural change. The course examines the various attempts that have been made over recent decades to find a synthesis between cultural and biological evolution. These approaches, often termed neo-Darwinian, include memes, dual inheritance theory, theories of cultural selection and transmission, niche construction theory and macro-evolutionary approaches. Research in all these areas will be examined, with particular reference to explanations for the origins of agriculture, but also including other transformations, and critiqued. New research in epigenetics offers an alternative non-Darwinian evolutionary perspective that avoids many of the problems and pitfalls in the neo-Darwinian approaches. Cultural evolution comes to be viewed as cumulative, directional and Lamarckian, since heritable epigenetic variation can underlie evolutionary change. Epigenetics opens the way for human cultural entanglements to become the drivers for evolutionary change, thus allowing the full range of social processes studied in the social and cultural sciences to take their place in the study and analysis of long-term change.
Last offered: Autumn 2018
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