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31 - 40 of 238 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 95B: Independent Study for Honors or Senior Paper Writing

Required of Anthropology honors or senior paper candidates. Taken in the final quarter before handing in the final draft of the Honors or Senior Paper and graduating. This independent study supports work on the honors and senior papers for students with an approved honors or senior paper application in Anthropology. Prerequisite: consent of Anthropology faculty advisor.nnTerms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum Units: 1-5nn(not repeatable for credit)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5

ANTHRO 96: Directed Individual Study

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

ANTHRO 97: Internship in Anthropology

Opportunity for students to pursue their specialization in an institutional setting such as a laboratory, clinic, research institute, or government agency. May be repeated for credit. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

ANTHRO 100D: Chavin de Huantar Research |Seminar (ARCHLGY 100D)

Archaeological analytical techniques appropriate for data recovered during archaeological fieldwork in Chavin de Huantar, Peru. Open to all interested students; fieldwork participants are expected to take the course. Students work on data from the previous field season to produce synthetic written reports, focusing on specific methodological issues.
Last offered: Autumn 2019

ANTHRO 101A: Archaeology as a Profession (ARCHLGY 107A)

Academic, contract, government, field, laboratory, museum, and heritage aspects of the profession.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5

ANTHRO 101S: Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 1S)

This course introduces basic anthropological concepts and presents the discipline's distinctive perspective on society and culture. The power of this perspective is illustrated by exploring vividly-written ethnographic cases that show how anthropological approaches illuminate contemporary social and political issues in a range of different cultural sites.
Last offered: Summer 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 103: The Archaeology of Climate (ARCHLGY 106)

This course reviews the long-term relationships between human societies and Earth's climatic systems. It provides a critical review of how archaeologists have approached climate change through various case studies and historical paradigms (e.g., societal `collapse,¿ resilience, historical ecology) and also addresses feedbacks between past human land use and global climate change, including current debates about the onset of the Anthropocene.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Bauer, A. (PI)

ANTHRO 106: Incas and their Ancestors: Peruvian Archaeology (ANTHRO 206A, ARCHLGY 102B)

The development of high civilizations in Andean S. America from hunter-gatherer origins to the powerful, expansive Inca empire. The contrasting ecologies of coast, sierra, and jungle areas of early Peruvian societies from 12,000 to 2,000 B.C.E. The domestication of indigenous plants which provided the economic foundation for monumental cities, ceramics, and textiles. Cultural evolution, and why and how major transformations occurred.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 107: Black Political Struggle Across the Americas (AFRICAAM 137)

This course orients students to the intersections between Anthropology and Black Studies through a survey of select ethnographic, historical, literary, and cinematographic materials based on Black political mobilizations across Latin America and the Caribbean. Organized by themes, the course pairs anthropological scholarship on Black political mobilizations against racialized violence and dispossession with critical Black Studies theoretical texts this scholarship is in conversation with. These pairings center what contemporary Black political struggle across the Americas teaches us about Black suffering, police terror, the problems of neoliberal multiculturalism, and the potential of transnational connections. Through case studies from Jamaica, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Nicaragua, Colombia, and Brazil, we ask: How have understanding the conditions of life of Black communities in the Americas contributed to and/or challenged broader theorizations of the State, violence, rights, and recognition? How do contemporary mobilizations and political imaginations of Black communities push the modern nation-state into crisis through demands for Black life? And how do these struggles theorize the time and space of the conditions of Black life through transnational politics?
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Morris, J. (PI)
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