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221 - 230 of 474 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 178: Evolution and Conservation in Galapagos (ANTHRO 278)

The contribution of research in the Galapagos Islands to our current understanding of evolution and conservation. Writings from Darwin to Dawkins, as they reveal patterns and processes of evolution including selection, adaptation, speciation, and coevolution. Current conservation strategies in the archipelago, and urgent measures needed today before unique species and adaptations are lost.
Last offered: Spring 2017

ANTHRO 178A: Culture, Narrative, and Medicine

This course examines the ways in which medicine is practiced in diverse cultural contexts with narrative skills of recognizing, interpreting and being moved by the stories of illness. It is an examination of the human experience of illness and healing through narratives as presented in literature, film, and storytelling. We explore how cultural resources enable and empower healing and how narrative medicine can guide the practice of culturally competent medical care.
Last offered: Autumn 2013 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-CE, WAY-ED

ANTHRO 179: Cultures of Disease: Cancer and HIV/AIDS (ENGLISH 179)

History, politics, science, and anthropology of cancer; political and economic issues of disease and health care in the U.S., including the ethics and economics of health care provision, the pharmaceutical industry, carcinogen production, and research priorities.
Last offered: Spring 2016

ANTHRO 179A: Health, Illness, and Healing in South Asia (ANTHRO 279A)

This course has three related goals pertinent to medicine and healing in South Asia. The first is to understand the experiences of illness, and therapy in ordinary South Asian communities. How do social and economic inequality, religious commitments, available healing traditions, and community and family contexts shape the experience of illness and healing? The second goal is to think about South Asian medical systems using a broad historical perspective. How had biomedicine been used during the colonial period to manage the health of native populations? What is the legacy of this colonial history on current practices? What happens when South Asian medical traditions (such as Ayurveda) become global? Third, we will explore crucial health problems in South Asia from the perspective of medical anthropology. Possible topics for the third portion of the course include: child birth and maternal health, sex-selection technologies, malnutrition, metabolic diseases, the selling of organs, medical tourism, tuberculosis, HIV, suicide, and schizophrenia.
Last offered: Spring 2013

ANTHRO 179B: Culture of Disease: The Social History of Vaccines

This course will detail the history and develop of vaccines, specifically examining critical issues such as personal choice v. public health, the use of experimental subjects, population-wide medical trials, and the use of animal tissues in vaccine development.
Last offered: Spring 2018

ANTHRO 180: Science, Technology, and Gender

Why is engineering often seen as a masculine profession? What have women's experiences been in entering fields of science and technology? How has gender been defined by scientists? Issues: the struggles of women in science to negotiate misogyny and cultural expectation (marriage, children), reproductive issues (surrogate motherhood, visual representations of the fetus, fetal surgery, breast feeding, childbirth practices), how the household became a site of consumerism and technology, and the cultural issues at stake as women join the ranks of scientists.
Last offered: Winter 2009 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender

ANTHRO 180A: Sex and Power (FEMGEN 180A)

From hook-up culture to pornography and sex work and even Beyoncé's latest album, "Lemonade," our struggles with consent, betrayal, and violence evince collective confusions about the relationship between sex and power in our societies. A quick Google search for news articles on the topic reveals that we must communally brace ourselves, usually through a Public Service Announcement pun, Let's Talk About Sex, and then a warning, Talking about sex can be hard. Cultural and social analyses can help us un-brace ourselves and get closer to meaningfully, and respectfully, talking about how cultural difference and social hierarchies fuel, and our fueled by, ideologies about sex and sexuality. This course examines sex as a nexus of socio-cultural, economic, and political relations of power for individuals and groups across local and global and national and transnational boundaries. And because a lot of the difficulties in talking about sex entail difficulties about ¿seeing¿ sex, this class relies on visual culture and documentary filmmaking alongside ethnographies and theoretical scholarship.
Last offered: Spring 2017

ANTHRO 181A: Gender in the Middle East: Iran, Turkey, and Egypt (FEMGEN 181A)

This course explores the construction of gender in the Middle East. Drawing on the historical, sociological and anthropological research in the region, the course aims to question the stereotypes about the subordination of Muslim women and to offer students a systematic reading and analytical discussion of the political, economic and cultural structures that inform gender relations and practices in the region. The course starts with an examination of early Islam and religious sources with regard to women¿s status, then moves on to nationalist and modernization movements in the 19th and 20th centuries, and finally explores women¿s and men¿s lives in contemporary Egypt, Turkey and Iran. In this framework, we will pay special attention to Islamist mobilizations, family and sexual relations, as well as women's changing livelihoods and labor.
Last offered: Autumn 2014 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 182: An Anthropology of Annihilation: Tobacco at the Turn of the Millennium

The cigarette as the world's greatest weapon of mass destruction: 100 million dead worldwide from cigarettes during the 20th century, one billion expected to die in the 21st century. How to understand this toll, its production, management, politicization, and depoliticization? What can anthropological and allied perspectives disclose? How does the catastrophe challenge key precepts within anthropology and other branches of the academy?
Last offered: Winter 2011 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 182A: Down and Out: Marginal Lives and Institutional Technologies (ANTHRO 282A)

This course examines the neglect and management of socially marginalized persons including the mentally ill, youth runaways, child wards of the state, drug addicts and prisoners. In this course, we will approach the concept of marginality by investigating the spaces and institutions of decay, neglect and rehabilitation to which unwanted and indigent individuals are relegated. Readings are focused on qualitative research conducted within institutions of health, welfare, and reform. There will be two comparative public mental health sections in this course: one focused on South Asia and the second on Africa. This course is relevant for students interested in medical anthropology, applied anthropology, public health policy, or clinical careers in medicine, psychology, or social work.
Last offered: Winter 2013
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