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81 - 90 of 212 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 151D: Art/Design/Craft

Key texts from art theory, design theory, and recent work in craft theory will be set in conversation with anthropological understandings of cultural production and creative expression in order to explore why art, design, and craft have so long been differently valued. Examines why ¿art¿ is associated with ¿vision¿, intellect, and creative expression, while ¿craft¿ is associated with ¿mere¿ skill, manual labor, and domesticity. Contemporary social and political implications are explored.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

ANTHRO 152A: Urban Poverty and Inequality in Contemporary China

Experiences of poverty and inequality and their relationship to gender, space development, post-socialism, and globalization. How processes of class-making in China's cities are bound up with transformations in the country's sociopolitcal landscape.

ANTHRO 153: Asylum: Knowledge, Politics, and Population (CSRE 153C)

This course draws from ethnography, social theory, media and literature to examines the place of the asylum in the constitution of knowledge, politics, and populations. An ancient juridical concept, asylum has been used to describe a fundamental political right, medical and penal institutions, as well as emergent spaces of care and safety. As such, thus course invites students to think of critical issues associated with asylum, including: illness, trauma, violence, immigration, displacement, human rights, sanctuary, and testimony.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 154: Anthropology of Drugs: Experience, Capitalism, Modernity (ANTHRO 254B, CSRE 154)

This course examines the significant role ¿drugs¿ play in shaping expressions of the self and social life; in the management populations, and in the production of markets and inequality. It engages these themes through cultural representations of drugs and drug use, analyses of scientific discourse, and social theory. Topics include: the social construction of the licit and illicit; the shifting boundaries of deviance, disease and pleasure; and the relationship between local markets and global wars.
Last offered: Winter 2018

ANTHRO 154C: Animism, Gaia, and Alternative Approaches to the Environment (ANTHRO 254C, ARCHLGY 154, ARCHLGY 254, DLCL 254, REES 254)

Indigenous knowledges have been traditionally treated as a field of research for anthropologists and as mistaken epistemologies, i.e., un-scientific and irrational folklore. However, within the framework of environmental humanities, current interest in non-anthropocentric approaches and epistemic injustice, animism emerged as a critique of modern epistemology and an alternative to the Western worldview. Treating native thought as an equivalent to Western knowledge will be presented as a (potentially) decolonizing and liberating practice. This course may be of interest to anthropology, archaeology and literature students working in the fields of ecocriticism and the environmental humanities/social sciences, students interested in the Anthropocene, geologic/mineral, bio-, eco- and geosocial collectives, symbiotic life-forms and non-human agencies. The course is designed as a research seminar for students interested in theory of the humanities and social sciences and simultaneously helping students to develop their individual projects and thesis.
Last offered: Spring 2019

ANTHRO 156: Japanese Anthropology (ANTHRO 256)

This is an advanced reading seminar in the field of Japanses Anthropology. nIt will explore the historical development of the field and the contemporary issues and topics taken up by scholars of Japanese anthropology. Prior knowledge of Japanese language, history, and, society is required.
Last offered: Spring 2019

ANTHRO 157: Japanese Popular Culture (ANTHRO 257)

This seminar focuses on the intersection between politics and popular culture in contemporary Japan. It will survey a range of social and political implications of practices of popular culture. Topics include J-pop, manga, anime, and other popular visual cultures, as well as social media. Students will be introduced to theories of popular culture in general, and a variety of contemporary anthropological studies on Japanese popular culture in particular. Prior knowledge of cultural anthropology is required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Inoue, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 158: The Anthropology of Social Class (ANTHRO 258)

Course introduces social theory concepts and paradigms for the understanding of class. It then extends and revises those concepts and paradigms by considering anthropological approaches in different cultural and historical settings that consider the entanglements of class with other social hierarchies, especially race, caste, and ideas of "civilization" and "development".
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Ferguson, J. (PI)

ANTHRO 159C: Ecological Humanities (ANTHRO 259C, DLCL 259C, REES 259C)

What sort of topics, research questions, approaches, theories and concepts lead to an integration of various kinds of knowledges? Ecological Humanities provides a conceptual platform for a merger of humanities and social sciences with earth and life sciences, soil science and forensic sciences. The course will discuss such selected topics as the Anthropocene, geologic/mineral and exhumed subjects/personae, bio- and geosocial collectives, symbiotic life-forms, non-human agencies, and forensic landscapes as examples of this merger.
Last offered: Spring 2018

ANTHRO 166: Political Ecology of Tropical Land Use: Conservation, Natural Resource Extraction, and Agribusiness (ANTHRO 266)

Seminar. The state, private sector, development agencies, and NGOs in development and conservation of tropical land use. Focus is on the socioeconomic and political drivers of resource extraction and agricultural production. Case studies used to examine the local-to-global context from many disciplines. Are maps and analyses used for gain, visibility, accountability, or contested terrain? How are power dynamics, land use history, state-private sector collusion, and neoliberal policies valued? What are the local and extra-local responses?
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Curran, L. (PI)
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