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341 - 350 of 442 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 316: Politics of the Mass Subject

Harbinger of democracy or arbiter of tyrannous rule? Source of collective agency or threat to political order? Over the past century, notions of the masses, the multitudes, and the people have served as volatile focal points for political theory and for institutions of governance. Drawing on historical, ethnographic, and theoretical readings, this course explores how tensions haunting these concepts continue to animate, as much as beleaguer, contemporary discussions of democratic citizenship and political modernity.
Last offered: Spring 2015

ANTHRO 317: Colonial Archives and Archaeology: Models and Methods of Analysis

This course details the methodological challenges associated with using primary historical documents, ethnographic methods and sources and archaeological data. How do archaeologists deal with multiple sources of data, primary texts (translated and original) and ethnographic materials? This course examines archaeological monographs as models for individual student projects leading to dissertation research and publishing beyond the dissertation. Students will be required to present materials, research questions and primary source materials to the class in order to expand our understanding of the challenges and insights provided by archival and archaeological studies.
Last offered: Winter 2013

ANTHRO 318: Democracy and Political Authority

Democracy is commonly defined in formalist terms as a form of government (involving the consent of the governed) and a procedure of governance (involving the rule of law). In place of a formalist definition, this course examines democracy as a historical and discursive form. In what ways have the rights of citizenship for some been premised on the domination of others (workers, women, the colonized, etc.)? What forms of violence are not only tolerated as practical necessity in the contemporary order of democratic states but sanctioned as morally just? What mechanisms of political authority operate by defining the boundaries between the tolerable and the intolerable, between citizenly belonging and terrorism ¿ in short, between democracy and its others (e.g., an arbitrary despot, a feudal economy, a religious fundamentalism)? These questions require urgent interrogation in the present day: the past thirty years have witnessed a virtual explosion of new constitutions proclaiming democratic sovereignty across the world. What forms of global power and institutional domination are constitutive of the contemporary era of liberty, freedom, and equality? Readings are drawn from a variety of disciplines, including anthropology, political theory, and political philosophy. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Last offered: Autumn 2012

ANTHRO 320A: Race, Ethnicity, and Language: Racial, Ethnic, and Linguistic Formations (CSRE 389A, EDUC 389A, LINGUIST 253)

Language, as a cultural resource for shaping our identities, is central to the concepts of race and ethnicity. This seminar explores the linguistic construction of race and ethnicity across a wide variety of contexts and communities. We begin with an examination of the concepts of race and ethnicity and what it means to be "doing race," both as scholarship and as part of our everyday lives. Throughout the course, we will take a comparative perspective and highlight how different racial/ethnic formations (Asian, Black, Latino, Native American, White, etc.) participate in similar, yet different, ways of drawing racial and ethnic distinctions. The seminar will draw heavily on scholarship in (linguistic) anthropology, sociolinguistics and education. We will explore how we talk and don't talk about race, how we both position ourselves and are positioned by others, how the way we talk can have real consequences on the trajectory of our lives, and how, despite this, we all participate in maintaining racial and ethnic hierarchies and inequality more generally, particularly in schools.
Last offered: Spring 2018

ANTHRO 321: Reading Marx, Reading Weber

This advanced graduate seminar is devoted to a critical reading of selected writings by two nineteenth century social theorists who continue to shape anthropology and social analysis more broadly. Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Anthropology or permission of the instructor. Previous graduate level coursework in cultural or social anthropology, social theory or cultural studies is required. No auditing is permitted. Maximum enrollment 12.
Last offered: Spring 2011

ANTHRO 321A: Anthropology and Literature: Problems of Representation, Power, and Textuality

How are literary and social scientific forms of cultural description, evocation, and interpretation related? The seminar reads classic texts as well as recent experiments, addressing issues of genre, rhetoric, epistemology, translation, authority, and collaboration. The emphasis is on writing as a situated practice¿embodied, relational, and historically circumscribed. Authors may include Malinowski, Mead, Benedict, Lévi-Strauss, Geertz, Taussig, Leiris, Conrad, Achebe, Said, Barthes, Kroeber, Le Guin, and selected contemporary ethnographies. Examples from film, visual culture, and performance art may also be included.
Last offered: Winter 2014

ANTHRO 321B: From Marx TO Piketty: Toward An Anthropology Of Wealth, Inequality and Power

This seminar will explore the ways in which theorists and researchers from Karl Marx to Thomas Piketty have conceptualized, studied, and analyzed inequality in capitalist societies. In considering the ways in which Marx, Piketty and other scholars approach profit, accumulation, wealth, inequality, class and power, we will be especially interested in how these are shaped by their ideas and assumptions about kinship, sentiment, gender, and subjectivity. We will work toward developing an anthropological framework and ethnographic research projects that build on our critical understanding of Marx and Piketty.n The course is limited to graduate students and anthropology majors who have taken Anthropology 90b.
Last offered: Spring 2016

ANTHRO 322: From Biopolitics to Necropolitics and Beyond

This seminar examines scholarship produced and informed by Michel Foucault and Giorgio Agamben, particularly as relating to biopolitics, governmentality, subjectification, and death. Focus is given to how anthropology and related disciplines have been applying, challenging, and extending these areas of thought in order to address contemporary predicaments. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Kohrman, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 323: Graduate Seminar in Economic Anthropology

Classical and contemporary anthropological perspectives on topics such as money, markets and exchange; capitalist and non-capitalist modes of production; class and socio-economic differentiation; globalization and neoliberalism; and the social and cultural construction of the object, "the economy". Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Ferguson, J. (PI)

ANTHRO 324: Political Anthropology

An anthropological approach to politics through bringing anthropological ways of thinking and modes of analysis to bear on key presuppositions of modern Western political thought. Ideas of rights, the individual, society, liberty, democracy, equality, and solidarity; ethnographic accounts used to identify the limits of conventional analytical approaches and to document the forms of politics that such approaches either ignore or misunderstand. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Last offered: Spring 2018
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