2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021 2021-2022
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 21 results for: POLISCI ; Currently searching summer courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

POLISCI 22SC: The Face of Battle

Our understanding of warfare often derives from the lofty perspective of political leaders and generals: what were their objectives and what strategies were developed to meet them? This top-down perspective slights the experience of the actual combatants and non-combatants caught in the crossfire. This course focuses on the complexity of the process by which strategy is translated into tactical decisions by the officers and foot soldiers and on what actually occurs on the field of battle. We will visit Washington, DC, and meet with national security officials and members of non-government organizations there. In addition, we will spend a day visiting the battlefields of Gettysburg (July 1863) in Pennsylvania, and the Little Bighorn (June 1876) in Montana. The course's battlefield tours are based on the "staff rides" developed by the Prussian Army in the mid-1800s and employed by the U.S. Army since the early 1900s. While at Stanford, students will conduct extensive research on individu more »
Our understanding of warfare often derives from the lofty perspective of political leaders and generals: what were their objectives and what strategies were developed to meet them? This top-down perspective slights the experience of the actual combatants and non-combatants caught in the crossfire. This course focuses on the complexity of the process by which strategy is translated into tactical decisions by the officers and foot soldiers and on what actually occurs on the field of battle. We will visit Washington, DC, and meet with national security officials and members of non-government organizations there. In addition, we will spend a day visiting the battlefields of Gettysburg (July 1863) in Pennsylvania, and the Little Bighorn (June 1876) in Montana. The course's battlefield tours are based on the "staff rides" developed by the Prussian Army in the mid-1800s and employed by the U.S. Army since the early 1900s. While at Stanford, students will conduct extensive research on individual participants at Gettysburg and Little Bighorn. Then, as we walk through the battlefield sites, students will brief the group on their subjects' experience of battle and on why they made the decisions they did. Why did Lt. General Longstreet oppose the Confederate attack on the Union Army at Gettysburg? What was the experience of a military surgeon, vivandiere, or nurse on a Civil War battlefield? What role did just war principles or law play in the treatment of enemy fighters and civilians? Why did Custer divide his 7th Cavalry troops as they approached the Little Bighorn River? What was the role of Lakota Sioux women after a battle? The final part of the class covers contemporary military conflicts discussing what the US public, political leaders, and military commanders have learned (and not learned) from the past. The course is open to students from a range of disciplines; an interest in the topic is the only prerequisite.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2

POLISCI 27SC: Policing and Violence in Latin America: Historical Origins and Contemporary Challenges

This course explores the origins of policing in Latin America and the contemporary challenges in the relationship between the State, organized crime, violence and police forces. By taking a long-term perspective we seek to understand why highly unequal countries in Latin America (and the US) have faced such difficulties in creating professionalized police forces that can effectively provide citizen security while ensuring the respect of fundamental human rights. The provision of security in Latin America has often been plagued by torture, excessive use of force, military deployments and police brutality. Police forces are often corrupt and unable to contain crime, while poor citizens in urban favelas and remote villages often resort to solutions that bypass or even challenge the State in its monopoly of the legitimate use of violence. History. In Spanish America colonial authorities sought to create forms of indirect governance, where indigenous communities would live 'en policía', whi more »
This course explores the origins of policing in Latin America and the contemporary challenges in the relationship between the State, organized crime, violence and police forces. By taking a long-term perspective we seek to understand why highly unequal countries in Latin America (and the US) have faced such difficulties in creating professionalized police forces that can effectively provide citizen security while ensuring the respect of fundamental human rights. The provision of security in Latin America has often been plagued by torture, excessive use of force, military deployments and police brutality. Police forces are often corrupt and unable to contain crime, while poor citizens in urban favelas and remote villages often resort to solutions that bypass or even challenge the State in its monopoly of the legitimate use of violence. History. In Spanish America colonial authorities sought to create forms of indirect governance, where indigenous communities would live 'en policía', which meant both a particular form of political engagement, as well as compliance with the legal forms of the colonial order. In Brazil and the Caribbean, as well as places characterized by colonial plantation economies, colonial policing often meant the enforcement of human bondage against runaway enslaved peoples. After independence police and military force was used in the newly independent countries by powerful caciques, caudillos and elites concentrating economic and political power as forms of popular repression and subjection. Contemporary challenges. The course will deal with contemporary issues too, addressing the challenges of police professionalization and reform in Latin America, exploring issues ranging from violence escalation in ungoverned spaces, the use of body worn cameras, proximity policing, the prevalence of torture, and the reform of judicial proceedings. The course will hence combine perspectives drawn from history, with contemporary debates on policing. We will be focusing more closely on the experiences of Mexico, Brazil, and Central America. Movie club and salon. Class sessions will be enriched with cinema screenings in the evenings of movies and documentaries that will bring to life some of the issues discussed in class. Those screenings will include a zoom segment to allow for a follow up discussion with directors, producers or a relevant expert. Field trips. Potential field trips may include:nPolice headquarters in Stockton, Oakland or Richmond, to learn about contemporary efforts at police reform in the US. Salinas Valley, to learn about the challenges faced by undocumented indigenous migrants in agricultural areas of California. Nearby California mission, such as San Carlos Borromeo de Carmelo or San Juan Bautista.nArchives at the Sutro and Bancroft Libraries to have an opportunity for a hands on examination of Spanish colonial documents.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2

POLISCI 28SC: Energy in Hawaii: Forefront of Clean Energy Technology and Policy (ENERGY 13SC)

We will explore practical, social, technical, and political issues surrounding energy production and use in Hawaii. Hawaii is at the forefront of changes in the electric grid and the uses of electricity, with an aspirational goal for 100% carbon-free electricity in 2045. Hawaii also has passed legislation that aspires to 100% fossil-free transportation by 2040. Significant growth of behind-the-meter solar generation with storage has led to opportunities for the better use of these resources for maintaining grid reliability, while also increasing concerns related to grid stability and social equity. Because of these factors, there is a heightened interest nationally from federal agencies, particularly Energy and Defense. We will consider the availability and viability of solar, wind, and geothermal resources, while also considering the economic impact on Hawaii of large-scale importation of oil for generating electricity and transportation. We will consider emerging questions related to more »
We will explore practical, social, technical, and political issues surrounding energy production and use in Hawaii. Hawaii is at the forefront of changes in the electric grid and the uses of electricity, with an aspirational goal for 100% carbon-free electricity in 2045. Hawaii also has passed legislation that aspires to 100% fossil-free transportation by 2040. Significant growth of behind-the-meter solar generation with storage has led to opportunities for the better use of these resources for maintaining grid reliability, while also increasing concerns related to grid stability and social equity. Because of these factors, there is a heightened interest nationally from federal agencies, particularly Energy and Defense. We will consider the availability and viability of solar, wind, and geothermal resources, while also considering the economic impact on Hawaii of large-scale importation of oil for generating electricity and transportation. We will consider emerging questions related to the reliability and the resiliency of the grids on different islands in the State. All of these issues will be considered in the technical, societal, cultural, natural resource, and political milieu which is the unique nature of Hawaii. We will spend the first week on campus learning about energy and its context in Hawaii, then travel to various field sites in Hawaii, including a wind farm, a utility-scale solar farm, an oil-fired power plant, a waste-to-energy facility, wave turbine, an oil refinery, a synthetic gas production facility, a biofueled thermal generator, a geothermal plant, and areas where natural resources are impacted by energy resource utilization. We will meet with relevant policy experts and public officials from governmental agencies, utilities, universities, and public interest groups. The course will conclude with group presentations by the students.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2
Instructors: Cain, B. (PI)

POLISCI 101Z: Introduction to International Relations (INTNLREL 101Z)

Approaches to the study of conflict and cooperation in world affairs. Applications to war, terrorism, trade policy, the environment, and world poverty. Debates about the ethics of war and the global distribution of wealth.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, GER:DB-SocSci

POLISCI 120Z: What's Wrong with American Government? An Institutional Approach

How politicians, once elected, work together to govern America. The roles of the President, Congress, and Courts in making and enforcing laws. Focus is on the impact of constitutional rules on the incentives of each branch, and on how they influence law.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

POLISCI 133Z: Ethics and Politics in Public Service (CSRE 133P, PUBLPOL 103Z, URBANST 122Z)

This course examines ethical and political questions that arise in doing public service work, whether volunteering, service learning, humanitarian endeavors overseas, or public service professions such as medicine and teaching. What motives do people have to engage in public service work? Are self-interested motives troublesome? What is the connection between service work and justice? Should the government or schools require citizens or students to perform service work? Is mandatory service an oxymoron?
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER

POLISCI 153Z: Strategy: Introduction to Game Theory

This course provides an introduction to strategic reasoning. We discuss ideas such as the commitment problem, credibility in signaling, cheap talk, moral hazard and adverse selection. Concepts are developed through games played in class, and applied to politics, business and everyday life.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR

POLISCI 209: Curricular Practical Training

Qualified Political Science students obtain employment in a relevant research or industrial activity to enhance their professional experience consistent with their degree programs. Meets the requirements for Curricular Practical Training for students on F-1 visas. The student is responsible for arranging their own internship/employment and gaining faculty sponsorship. Prior to enrolling, students must complete a petition form available on the Political Science website ( politicalscience.stanford.edu/undergraduate-program/forms). The petition is due no later the end of week one of the quarter in which the student intends to enroll. If the CPT is for Summer, the petition form is due by May 31. An offer letter will need to be submitted along with the petition. At the completion of the CPT quarter, a final report must be submitted to the faculty sponsor documenting the work done and its relevance to Political Science. This course be repeated for credit up to 3 times but will not count toward the Political Science major or minor requirements.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

POLISCI 219: Directed Reading and Research in International Relations

For undergraduates. Directed reading in Political Science with a focus on international relations. To be considered for enrollment, interested students must complete the directed reading petition form available on the Political Science website before the end of week 1 of the quarter in which they'd like to enroll. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

POLISCI 229: Directed Reading and Research in American Politics

For undergraduates. Directed reading in Political Science with a focus on American politics. To be considered for enrollment, interested students must complete the directed reading petition form available on the Political Science website before the end of week 1 of the quarter in which they'd like to enroll. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints