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1 - 10 of 12 results for: CLASSICS ; Currently searching summer courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CLASSICS 6L: Latin 400-1700 CE (CLASSICS 208L, RELIGST 173X)

Readings in later Latin, drawing on the vast bodies of texts from the late antique, medieval and early modern periods. Each week students will prepare selections in advance of class meetings; class time will be devoted to translation and discussion. Students taking this course will gain exposure to a wide range of later Latin texts; hone translation skills; and develop an awareness of the grammatical and stylistic features of post-classical Latin. The course is aimed both at classical Latinists seeking to broaden their reading experience and at medievalists and early modernists seeking to consolidate their Latin language skills. May be repeat for credit.nnPrior experience in Latin is required, preferably CLASSICS 11L. Equivalent accepted. Classics majors and minors may repeat for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Does not fulfill the language requirement in Classical Studies track.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit

CLASSICS 14: Greek and Latin Roots of English

(Formerly CLASSGEN 9) Goal is to improve vocabulary, comprehension of written English, and standardized test scores through learning the Greek and Latin components of English. Focus is on patterns and processes in the formation of the lexicon. Terminology used in medicine, business, education, law, and humanities; introduction to principles of language history and etymology. Greek or Latin not required.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3

CLASSICS 17SC: Classical California

If you counted the many modern guises in which ancient Greece and Rome show up in our lives, how many could you find? You might consider, for example, words we speak, films we watch, buildings we use, political concepts we debate, styles we admire, myths we read. This course is our chance to explore such rich diversity, emphasizing the more material kinds of `classical remembrance. Our focus will be on California, its architecture, its collections of ancient objects. Readings, to be discussed in class, will inform our treasure hunt, which will start with Stanford University collections and proceed farther afield. Pandemic permitting, we'll visit the Getty Villa in Malibu, one of the world's foremost collections of ancient art housed in the imposing reconstruction of an ancient Roman villa. We'll archive our favorite discoveries, some obvious and some intriguingly obscure, in a digital museum which our class will co-create from scratch. But this will be a treasure hunt with a difference more »
If you counted the many modern guises in which ancient Greece and Rome show up in our lives, how many could you find? You might consider, for example, words we speak, films we watch, buildings we use, political concepts we debate, styles we admire, myths we read. This course is our chance to explore such rich diversity, emphasizing the more material kinds of `classical remembrance. Our focus will be on California, its architecture, its collections of ancient objects. Readings, to be discussed in class, will inform our treasure hunt, which will start with Stanford University collections and proceed farther afield. Pandemic permitting, we'll visit the Getty Villa in Malibu, one of the world's foremost collections of ancient art housed in the imposing reconstruction of an ancient Roman villa. We'll archive our favorite discoveries, some obvious and some intriguingly obscure, in a digital museum which our class will co-create from scratch. But this will be a treasure hunt with a difference: while pursuing it we'll develop critical awareness about the very nature of ancient Greece and Rome and its legacies. Some of the questions to discuss are: What does the term `classical' convey? How might we weigh this supposed classicism against other traditions? Which ancient voices are heard and which remain silent? To whom do the legacies of ancient Greece and Rome belong? What are the ethics involved in collecting classical antiquities? How does antiquity `read' our very selves, individually and collectively?nAll are welcome, whether you're new to ancient studies or an old hand. Newcomers will get a uniquely experiential introduction to ancient Greece and Rome. Others will have the opportunity to deepen selected aspects of their classical knowledge. All students will emerge from the class with a broad overview of Greco-Roman pasts; will appreciate the range of human engagements with Greco-Roman antiquity, particularly in its local and regional manifestations; will understand the nature of the 'classical' in relation to other artistic traditions; will understand the role of ancient Greece and Rome in relation to fundamental human values and questions.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2
Instructors: Parker, G. (PI)

CLASSICS 31: Greek Mythology

The heroic and divine in the literature, mythology, and culture of archaic Greece. Interdisciplinary approach to the study of individuals and society. Illustrated lectures. Readings in translation of Homer, Hesiod, and the poets of lyric and tragedy. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required during regular academic quarters (Aut, Win, Spr)
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, GER:DB-Hum

CLASSICS 198: Directed Readings (Undergraduate)

(Formerly CLASSGEN 160.) May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit

CLASSICS 199: Undergraduate Thesis: Senior Research

(Formerly CLASSGEN 199.) May be repeated for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

CLASSICS 208L: Latin 400-1700 CE (CLASSICS 6L, RELIGST 173X)

Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit

CLASSICS 297: Dissertation Proposal Preparation

This course is to be taken twice during the third year of the Classics PhD program. It takes the form of a tutorial based on weekly meetings, leading to the writing of the dissertation prospectus. To register, a student obtain permission from the prospective faculty advisor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit (up to 99 units total)

CLASSICS 298: Directed Reading in Classics (Graduate Students)

This course is offered for students requiring specialized training in an area not covered by existing courses. To register, a student must obtain permission from the Classics Department and the faculty member who is willing to supervise the reading. This course can be repeated for credit, not to exceed 20 units total.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit (up to 20 units total)

CLASSICS 399: Graduate Research in Classics

For graduate students only. Individual research by arrangement with in-department instructors. To register, a student must obtain permission from the faculty member who is willing to supervise the research.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit
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