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1 - 10 of 20 results for: ANTHRO ; Currently searching summer courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ANTHRO 1: Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 201)

This course introduces basic anthropological concepts and presents the discipline's distinctive perspective on society and culture. The power of this perspective is illustrated by exploring vividly-written ethnographic cases that show how anthropological approaches illuminate contemporary social and political issues in a range of different cultural sites. In addition to class meeting time, a one-hour, once weekly required discussion section will be assigned in the first week of the quarter.
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II

ANTHRO 10SC: Evolution and Conservation in Galápagos (HUMBIO 17SC)

The tiny remote islands of Galápagos have played a central role in the study of evolution. Not surprisingly, they have also been important to theory and practice in biodiversity conservation. The fascinating adaptations of organisms to the unusual, isolated ecosystems of the archipelago have left them particularly vulnerable to perturbations and introductions from the outside. Drawing on lessons learned from Darwin's time to the present, this seminar explores evolution, conservation, and their connection among the habitats and organisms of Galápagos. Using case-study material on tortoises, iguanas, finches, Scalesia plants, penguins, cormorants and more, we will explore current theory and debate about adaptation, speciation, adaptive radiation, sexual selection, and other topics in evolution. Similarly, we will explore the special challenges Galápagos poses today for conservation, owing to both its unusual biota and to the increasing impact of human activity in the archipelago.
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The tiny remote islands of Galápagos have played a central role in the study of evolution. Not surprisingly, they have also been important to theory and practice in biodiversity conservation. The fascinating adaptations of organisms to the unusual, isolated ecosystems of the archipelago have left them particularly vulnerable to perturbations and introductions from the outside. Drawing on lessons learned from Darwin's time to the present, this seminar explores evolution, conservation, and their connection among the habitats and organisms of Galápagos. Using case-study material on tortoises, iguanas, finches, Scalesia plants, penguins, cormorants and more, we will explore current theory and debate about adaptation, speciation, adaptive radiation, sexual selection, and other topics in evolution. Similarly, we will explore the special challenges Galápagos poses today for conservation, owing to both its unusual biota and to the increasing impact of human activity in the archipelago.
This course includes, at no additional cost to students, an intensive eleven-day expedition to Galápagos, provided that public health conditions permit. The goal of the expedition is both to observe firsthand many of the evolutionary adaptations and conservation dilemmas that we have read about, and to look for new examples and potential solutions. A chartered ship from Lindblad Expeditions, with the highest levels of COVID protection protocol, will serve as our floating classroom, dormitory, and dining hall as we work our way around the archipelago to visit eight different islands. For this portion of the class, undergraduates will be joined by a small group of Stanford alumni and friends in a format called a Stanford "Field Seminar." Because our class time on campus is limited to one week before travel, students will be required to complete all course readings over the summer.
nThe course emphasizes student contributions and presentations. Students will be asked to lead class discussions and to carry out a thorough literature review of some aspect of the evolution and/or conservation of one or more Galápagos species. The final assignment for the seminar is to complete a seven- to ten-page paper about that review and to present its main findings in a joint seminar of undergrads and alumni as we travel in Galápagos.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2
Instructors: Durham, W. (PI)

ANTHRO 95: Research in Anthropology

Independent research conducted under faculty supervision, normally taken junior or senior year in pursuit of a senior paper or an honors project. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 10 units total)

ANTHRO 95B: Independent Study for Honors or Senior Paper Writing

Required of Anthropology honors or senior paper candidates. Taken in the final quarter before handing in the final draft of the Honors or Senior Paper and graduating. This independent study supports work on the honors and senior papers for students with an approved honors or senior paper application in Anthropology. Prerequisite: consent of Anthropology faculty advisor.nnTerms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum Units: 1-5nn(not repeatable for credit)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5

ANTHRO 96: Directed Individual Study

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

ANTHRO 97: Internship in Anthropology

Opportunity for students to pursue their specialization in an institutional setting such as a laboratory, clinic, research institute, or government agency. May be repeated for credit. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit

ANTHRO 104B: Landscapes of Inequality: The Southwestern United (ARCHLGY 104B)

Inequality is one of the major social issues of the current moment in the United States. Racial, economic, and gender inequality has been even more pronounced in the fall out of the COVID-19 pandemic around the world. These injustices are identifiable at the individual and institutional level, but they also are enmeshed in the physical landscapes in which we live. What can archaeology (conventionally defined as the study of the past through material traces) help us learn about present day inequalities and landscapes? This course explores novel approaches to archaeological research across time in the Southwestern United States. We begin with material investigations of the experience of crossing the US-Mexico border, which demonstrate how the landscape itself is weaponized. We then move backwards in time to explore the intimate landscape of incarcerated people of Japanese Ancestry during WWII, where gardens were an important practice of persistence and opportunity for survivors to re-engage the past. Finally, we will explore how ancient Chacoan landscapes index the consolidation of power and hierarchy in the past, and are the site of struggles for indigenous sovereignty and environmental justice in the present. This course will introduce you to major themes in landscape studies and archaeology including: place-making, agency, regional analysis and ethics.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3

ANTHRO 127B: Millennial Pop Culture: The Making of a Millennial

This course investigates American popular culture since the year 2000. Our goals will be to establish a working definition of the term "millennials" and to determine how pop culture influences the formation of that identity the 21st century. Through texts that frame issues including race, gender, sexuality, patriotism, and the use of technology, we will develop a discussion that cultivates 21st century engagement skills, reflecting critically on songs, television shows, images, videos, films, written texts, and blogs.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3

ANTHRO 136: The Anthropology of Global Supply Chains

This upper-division undergraduate seminar focuses on recent studies by anthropologists and scholars in related disciplines on global supply chains and consumption practices.The goal of the course is to assess concepts and methods for integrating a cultural analysis of transnational production with a cultural analysis of transnational consumption. We will review ethnographic studies of the production and consumption of commodities linked by transnational and global networks. The class will thennpursue collaborative research on the global production, distribution, and consumption of a selected commodity. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing and previous coursework in cultural anthropology or permission of instructor.
Terms: Sum | Units: 5

ANTHRO 145S: Implicit Bias: Stereotyping, Prejudice, and the Psychology of Racism

This class explores the psychology and sociology of prejudice, asking a deceptively simple question: what is race? From here follows a second question: what is racism? We'll explore implicit bias, and equip students to understand it, recognize it, and critically evaluate it. We'll start by outlining early colonial theories of scientific racism and the ongoing myths around race and intelligence, including phrenology, eugenics, and discussions of stereotype threat and IQ. We will question how race can be at once not based in any evolutionary, demographic, or biological reality and yet be a driving force in many social and political arenas. We will then examine stereotypes more widely, and how they can persist in society despite the decline of overt prejudice, through mechanisms of implicit bias, microaggression, and institutional racism. Students will take from this course a much deeper understanding of how prejudice shaped the contemporary world and how different approaches to understanding our own and others' implicit bias have implications for social policy and social justice.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3
Instructors: Maull, S. (PI)
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