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141 - 150 of 289 results for: VPGE::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

EDUC 440: Re-Examining Special Education through Multiple Lenses

This seminar, intended to grow and shift with the changing landscape of education, with particular focus on students with learning differences and the interests of our doctoral students and faculty, begins by exploring three questions: (1) How can scholars and scientists support the growth and development of students with learning differences? (2) How do we define and critique evidence-based practices (EDPs), including what counts as evidence and in what ways do EDPs support change in school outcomes? (3) In what ways do the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) provide direction and support progress in creating fully inclusive communities across the U.S.? What are the missed opportunities, misdirections, and barriers to fully emancipated and connected lives? Conveners will likely change each quarter along with topics
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 12 times (up to 36 units total)

EDUC 445: Entrepreneurial Approaches to Education Reform

(Same as STRAMGT 335) In this course, students will investigate opportunities and challenges of entrepreneurial ventures trying to make a positive impact in public education. The course requires a basic level of understanding of the U.S. K-12 public school system. The first session will analyze the structure of the public education as an industry, with a special emphasis on understanding the achievement gap. Subsequent sessions will explore challenges in increasing efficacy, ensuring financial sustainability, and scaling for entrepreneurs who have sought to change student outcomes, solve pain points, and innovate. The course will feature a variety of ventures (including schools, education technology, training, and supplemental services) and organizational models (for-profit, not-for-profit, and benefit corporation). This course is suitable for students aspiring to be entrepreneurs, leaders in entrepreneurial organizations, leaders in educational organizations, Board members, donors or investors. (Note: this is not a "how-to" course on starting an entrepreneurial venture.)
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Lee, G. (PI)

EDUC 450C: Qualitative Interviewing (ENVRES 231)

Addressing the theoretical underpinnings of qualitative interviews as well as the application of theory to practice, this course considers different approaches to interviewing. Interview types covered will range from group interviews to individual interviews, and from unstructured, ethnographically oriented interviews to highly structured interviews. Working with community partners to facilitate application to practice, the students will move from theory to interview design, implementation, and initial stages of analysis, with an emphasis on consistency in approach and utility in graduate-level research.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)
Instructors: Ardoin, N. (PI)

EDUC 489: RILE Colloquium on Race, Inequality, and Language in Education

This course is a workshop for PhD students focusing on interdisciplinary empirical work related to Race, Inequality, and Language in Education.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 10 times (up to 20 units total)

EE 292I: Insanely Great Products: How do they get built?

Great products emerge from a sometimes conflict-laden process of collaboration between different functions within companies. This Seminar seeks to demystify this process via case-studies of successful products and companies. Engineering management and businesspeople will share their experiences in discussion with students. Previous companies profiled: Apple, Intel, Facebook, and Genentech -- to name a few. Previous guests include: Jon Rubinstein (NeXT, Apple, Palm), Diane Greene (VMware), and Ted Hoff (Intel). Pre-requisites: None
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Obershaw, D. (PI)

EE 402A: Topics in International Technology Management (EALC 402A, EASTASN 402A)

Theme for Autumn 2020 is "Digital transformation among new and traditional industries in Asia." Distinguished guest speakers and panels from industry discuss approaches in Asia to data-driven business models, influencer marketing, DevOps for new AI solutions, data privacy and security, new value chain relationships, etc. See syllabus for specific requirements, which may differ from those of other seminars at Stanford.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Dasher, R. (PI)

EE 402T: Entrepreneurship in Asian High Tech Industries (EALC 402T, EASTASN 402T)

Distinctive patterns and challenges of entrepreneurship in Asia; update of business and technology issues in the creation and growth of start-up companies in major Asian economies. Distinguished speakers from industry, government, and academia.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Dasher, R. (PI)

EFSLANG 690A: Interacting in English

Strategies for communicating effectively in social and academic settings. Informal and formal language used in campus settings, including starting and maintaining conversations, asking questions, making complaints, and contributing ideas and opinions. Simulations and discussions, with feedback on pronunciation, grammar, and usage.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3

EFSLANG 690B: Academic Discussion

Skills for effective participation in classroom settings, seminars, and research group meetings. Pronunciation, grammar, and appropriateness for specific tasks. Feedback on language and communication style. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 690A or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)

EFSLANG 690C: Advanced Interacting in English

Communication skills for extended discourse such as storytelling and presenting supported arguments. Development of interactive listening facility and overall intelligibility and accuracy. Goal is advanced fluency in classroom, professional and social settings. Identification of and attention to individual patterned errors. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: EFSLANG 690B or consent of instructor. Enrollment limited to 14.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)
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