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1 - 10 of 16 results for: PHYSICS ; Currently searching summer courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

PHYSICS 15: Stars and Planets in a Habitable Universe

Is the Earth unique in our galaxy? Students learn how stars and our galaxy have evolved and how this produces planets and the conditions suitable for life. Discussion of the motion of the night sky and how telescopes collect and analyze light. The life-cycle of stars from birth to death, and the end products of that life cycle -- from dense stellar corpses to supernova explosions. Course covers recent discoveries of extrasolar planets -- those orbiting stars beyond our sun -- and the ultimate quest for other Earths. Intended to be accessible to non-science majors, material is explored quantitatively with problem sets using basic algebra and numerical estimates. Sky observing exercise and observatory field trips supplement the classroom work.
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

PHYSICS 16: The Origin and Development of the Cosmos

How did the present Universe come to be? The last few decades have seen remarkable progress in understanding this age-old question. Course will cover the history of the Universe from its earliest moments to the present day, and the physical laws that govern its evolution. The early Universe including inflation and the creation of matter and the elements. Recent discoveries in our understanding of the makeup of the cosmos, including dark matter and dark energy. Evolution of galaxies, clusters, and quasars, and the Universe as a whole. Implications of dark matter and dark energy for the future evolution of the cosmos. Intended to be accessible to non-science majors, material is explored quantitatively with problem sets using basic algebra and numerical estimates.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

PHYSICS 43: Electricity and Magnetism

What is electricity? What is magnetism? How are they related? How do these phenomena manifest themselves in the physical world? The theory of electricity and magnetism, as codified by Maxwell's equations, underlies much of the observable universe. Students develop both conceptual and quantitative knowledge of this theory. Topics include: electrostatics; magnetostatics; simple AC and DC circuits involving capacitors, inductors, and resistors; integral form of Maxwell's equations; electromagnetic waves. Principles illustrated in the context of modern technologies. Broader scientific questions addressed include: How do physical theories evolve? What is the interplay between basic physical theories and associated technologies? Discussions based on the language of mathematics, particularly differential and integral calculus, and vectors. Physical understanding fostered by peer interaction and demonstrations in lecture, and discussion sections based on interactive group problem solving. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 41 or equivalent. MATH 21 or MATH 51 or CME 100 or equivalent. Recommended corequisite: MATH 52 or CME 102.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

PHYSICS 44: Electricity and Magnetism Lab

Hands-on exploration of concepts in electricity, magnetism, and circuits. Introduction to multimeters, function generators, oscilloscopes, and graphing techniques. Pre- or corequisite: PHYSICS 43.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 1

PHYSICS 65: Quantum and Thermal Physics

(Third in a three-part advanced freshman physics series: PHYSICS 61, PHYSICS 63, PHYSICS 65.) This course introduces the foundations of quantum and thermodynamics for students with a strong high school mathematics and physics background, who are contemplating a major in Physics or Engineering Physics, or are interested in a rigorous treatment of physics. Topics related to quantum mechanics include: atoms, electrons, nuclei. Experimental evidence for physics that is not explained by classical mechanics and E&M. Quantization of light, Planck's constant. Photoelectric effect, Compton and Bragg scattering. Bohr model, atomic spectra. Matter waves, wave packets, interference. Fourier analysis and transforms, Heisenberg uncertainty relationships. Particle-in-a-box, simple harmonic oscillator, barrier penetration, tunneling. Topics related to thermodynamics: limitations of classical mechanics in describing systems with a very large number of particles. Ideal gas, equipartition, heat capacity, definition of temperature, entropy. Brief introduction to kinetic theory and statistical mechanics. Maxwell speed distribution, ideal gas in a box. Laws of thermodynamics. Cycles, heat engines, free energy. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 61 & PHYSICS 63.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Gratta, G. (PI)

PHYSICS 67: Introduction to Laboratory Physics

Methods of experimental design, data collection and analysis, statistics, curve fitting and model validation used in experimental science. Study of common data analysis techniques drawn via example measurements from electronics, optics, heat, and modern physics. Lecture format only for AY2020/2021. Required for PHYSICS 60 series Physics and Engineering Physics majors; recommended for PHYSICS 40 series students who intend to major in Physics or Engineering Physics. Pre- or corequisite: PHYSICS 65 or PHYSICS 43.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1
Instructors: Charles, E. (PI)

PHYSICS 96N: Harmony and the Universe

Harmony is a multifaceted concept that has profoundly connects music, mathematics, physics, philosophy, physiology, and psychology. We will explore the evolution of our understanding of harmony and its immediate application in the function of musical instruments, and employ it as a nexus to understand its role in revolutionary scientific advances in gravity, relativity, quantum mechanics, and cosmology. In these explorations, we will examine some of the fundamental mathematical tools which provide us our current understanding of harmony. We will also see how the some concepts surrounding harmony are in tension, if not conflict, and how some great thinkers have followed them down down blind alleys and dead ends. The aim of the course is to show the enormous consequences of harmony in the evolution of our understanding of the universe, and how science itself progresses in fits, starts, and setbacks as old ideas intermingle with new developments. We will also see how objective/quantitative aspects of harmony interact with subjective/qualitative considerations, and how cultural perspectives and prejudices can affect the progression of science.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Tanaka, H. (PI)

PHYSICS 104: Electronics and Introduction to Experimental Methods

Introductory laboratory electronics, intended for Physics and Engineering Physics majors but open to all students with science or engineering interests in analog circuits, instrumentation and signal processing. The first part of the course is focused on hands-on exercises that build skills needed for measurements, including input/output impedance concepts, filters, amplifiers, sensors, and fundamentals of noise in physical systems. Lab exercises include DC circuits, RC and diode circuits, applications of operational amplifiers, optoelectronics, synchronous detection, and noise in measurements. The second portion of the class is an instrumentation design project, where essential instrumentation for a practical lab measurement is designed, constructed and applied for an experiment. Example measurements can include temperature measurement in a cryostat, resistivity measurement of a superconducting material, measurement of the 2-D position of an optical beam, development of a high impedanc more »
Introductory laboratory electronics, intended for Physics and Engineering Physics majors but open to all students with science or engineering interests in analog circuits, instrumentation and signal processing. The first part of the course is focused on hands-on exercises that build skills needed for measurements, including input/output impedance concepts, filters, amplifiers, sensors, and fundamentals of noise in physical systems. Lab exercises include DC circuits, RC and diode circuits, applications of operational amplifiers, optoelectronics, synchronous detection, and noise in measurements. The second portion of the class is an instrumentation design project, where essential instrumentation for a practical lab measurement is designed, constructed and applied for an experiment. Example measurements can include temperature measurement in a cryostat, resistivity measurement of a superconducting material, measurement of the 2-D position of an optical beam, development of a high impedance ion probe and clamp for neuroscience, or other projects of personal interest. The course focuses on practical techniques and insight from the lab exercises, with a goal to prepare undergraduates for laboratory research. No formal electronics experience is required beyond exposure to concepts from introductory Physics or Engineering courses (Ohm's law, charge conservation, physics of capacitors and inductors, etc.). Recommended prerequisite: Physics 43 and 44 or Physics 63 and 64, or Engineering 40A or 40M.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4
Instructors: Fox, J. (PI)

PHYSICS 121: Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism II

Conservation laws and electromagnetic waves, Poynting's theorem, tensor formulation, potentials and fields. Plane wave problems (free space, conductors and dielectric materials, boundaries). Dipole and quadruple radiation. Special relativity and transformation between electric and magnetic fields. Prerequisites: PHYS 120 and PHYS 111 or MATH 131P or MATH 173; Recommended: PHYS 112.
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 4

PHYSICS 190: Independent Research and Study

Undergraduate research in experimental or theoretical physics under the supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisites: superior work as an undergraduate Physics major and consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-9 | Repeatable for credit
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