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1 - 3 of 3 results for: OSPFLOR ; Currently searching summer courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

OSPFLOR 87: What is Love? The Amorous Discourse from Dante to Ferrante

Talking about love was the main reason humans ever began to speak in the first place. From the moment words were invented, they have been used to interpret and describe, in verse and prose, this powerful and mysterious force, in an attempt to interpret and describe our very selves. Lyric poetry was specifically designed for that, but even when telling stories about war, adventure, or the meaning of life and death, as well as when narrating comic or tragic events, countless writers have often endeavored to answer the question: What is love? By combining close readings of texts with a study of their literary, cultural, and historical context, and by paying attention to individual innovations as well as one's dialogue with tradition (a gendered tradition, that nonetheless stimulates fluid and even queer responses from the Renaissance forward), we will discover Dante's love, a means of damnation or salvation; Petrarch's love, which is sinful distraction, the source of poetry, and a path to more »
Talking about love was the main reason humans ever began to speak in the first place. From the moment words were invented, they have been used to interpret and describe, in verse and prose, this powerful and mysterious force, in an attempt to interpret and describe our very selves. Lyric poetry was specifically designed for that, but even when telling stories about war, adventure, or the meaning of life and death, as well as when narrating comic or tragic events, countless writers have often endeavored to answer the question: What is love? By combining close readings of texts with a study of their literary, cultural, and historical context, and by paying attention to individual innovations as well as one's dialogue with tradition (a gendered tradition, that nonetheless stimulates fluid and even queer responses from the Renaissance forward), we will discover Dante's love, a means of damnation or salvation; Petrarch's love, which is sinful distraction, the source of poetry, and a path to glory; Boccaccio's love, so sensual and yet so deeply rooted in the human soul as to cause the greatest joy or the deepest despair; Ariosto's love, a dangerous force that can drive people to madness in a world where, after all, everyone is somehow in love and therefore partly (and delightfully) crazy; Machiavelli's love, which can sharpen one's wits and bring with it great achievements, unless it clouds one's judgement and leads to failure; Aretino's love, so unabashedly physical and graphically explicit as to cause scandal and amazement all over Europe. We will also look at how love is described by Veronica Gambara, Vittoria Colonna, Gaspara Stampa and other women poets of the Renaissance who renewed the lyrical code from within, giving new meanings to old words. We will also listen to the various kinds of love put to music in operas from Don Giovanni to Traviata and Bohème, and we will investigate how love interrelates with history in Manzoni's Promessi sposi and other Romantic historical novels. Finally, we will explore how the previous (male) narratives about love were reconfigured and reinvented by female novelists of the 20th century such as Goliarda Sapienza, Natalia Ginzburg and Elsa Morante, who will lead us to delve into Elena Ferrante's works, where love constantly interplays with friendship, and often confirms that, for better or for worse, appearances can be deceiving. Instructor: L. Degl'Innocenti
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

OSPFLOR 88: Made in Italy: Heritage, Creativity, Sustainability

This course discusses how the unique Italian heritage in manufacturing and in creative industry has been translated in economic value for the fashion and luxury industry.nnThe module deals with the origin, development and evolution of Made in Italy by approaching its main characteristics, i.e. creativity, innovation and exclusivity. The course will offer students a comprehensive overview of the Made in Italy concept, of its actual implementation and present evolution within a globalized economy, looking in particular at the territorial dimension in the specific case of Tuscany and Florence. nnStudents will be exposed to the fundamental theories relevant to understand the Made in Italy phenomenon but also to "live cases" related to Italian success stories that characterize Italian reputation. This approach will ensure students an in depth understanding of how territory, craftsmanship and heritage have strategically contributed to the shaping of "Made in Italy" and to its unique positioning on a global scale.nnInstructors: N. Bellini & S. Rovai
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

OSPFLOR 90: Ma(s)king Race in Contemporary Post and Decolonial Italy

The course aims to introduce students to contemporary academic debates on race and racism in Italy. Issues of race, ethnicity and belonging will be explored through a sociological approach and an intersectional lens. Gender and class, as well as other particular ¿ systemic and not ¿ oppressions, will be taken into account in order to define how they interlock with each other in 2020 Italy.nnInstructor: Mackda Ghebremariam Tesfau'
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
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