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1 - 10 of 54 results for: MED ; Currently searching summer courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

MED 164: Covid-19 Case Investigation and Contact Tracing (CHPR 235, MED 264)

In this service-learning course students will be learn how to identify people who have COVID-19 and those who have been exposed to people with COVID-19. Students will learn basics about the biology and health effects of SARS-CoV-2 and the epidemiology of COVID-19. Students will be taught important skills in healthcare communication including motivational interviewing, health education, and health coaching. Students will work as volunteers together with Santa Clara County staff to interrupt the chains of transmission of COVID-19 as they apply skills they have learned to help people with the illness and those who have been exposed understand the importance of isolation, quarantine, and other critical aspects of public health needed to control and manage this disease. Students will need to be willing to commit 20 hours per week to this course for 10 weeks over 2 quarters. Requires application and instructor approval. Please contact Course Director, Lars Osterberg MD, MPH for an application form and approval for enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 3-6 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Repeatable 3 times (up to 18 units total)

MED 182: Early Clinical Experience at the Cardinal Free Clinics (MED 282)

The Cardinal Free Clinics, consisting of Arbor and Pacific Free Clinic, provide culturally appropriate, high quality transitional medical care for underserved patient populations in the Bay Area. Students volunteer in various clinic roles to offer services including health education, interpretation, referrals, and labs. In clinic students are guided in the practice of medical interviews, history-taking and physical examinations as appropriate, and work with attending physicians to arrive at a diagnosis and management plan. Visit http://cfc.stanford.edu for more information. For questions related to the course or volunteering, please email arborclinic@stanford.edu and/or pacific@ med.stanford.edu. Application only; must be an accepted CFC volunteer
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

MED 199: Undergraduate Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Advani, R. (PI) ; Ahmed, A. (PI) ; Ahuja, N. (PI) ; Akatsu, H. (PI) ; Al-Ahmad, A. (PI) ; Alizadeh, A. (PI) ; Alsan, M. (PI) ; Anand, S. (PI) ; Andrews, J. (PI) ; Annes, J. (PI) ; Arai, S. (PI) ; Artandi, M. (PI) ; Artandi, S. (PI) ; Asch, S. (PI) ; Ashley, E. (PI) ; Assimes, T. (PI) ; Ayoub, W. (PI) ; Baiocchi, M. (PI) ; Banerjee, S. (PI) ; Barry, M. (PI) ; Basaviah, P. (PI) ; Basina, M. (PI) ; Basu, S. (PI) ; Behal, R. (PI) ; Bendavid, E. (PI) ; Benjamin, J. (PI) ; Berube, C. (PI) ; Bhalla, V. (PI) ; Bhatt, A. (PI) ; Bhattacharya, J. (PI) ; Blackburn, B. (PI) ; Blaschke, T. (PI) ; Blayney, D. (PI) ; Blish, C. (PI) ; Bloom, G. (PI) ; Bollyky, P. (PI) ; Bouvier, D. (PI) ; Boxer, L. (PI) ; Braddock, C. (PI) ; Brinton, T. (PI) ; Brown, W. (PI) ; Bulow, K. (PI) ; Carlson, R. (PI) ; Cartwright, C. (PI) ; Chan, D. (PI) ; Chan, G. (PI) ; Chang, C. (PI) ; Chang, S. (PI) ; Chaudhuri, O. (PI) ; Chen, A. (PI) ; Chertow, G. (PI) ; Cheung, R. (PI) ; Chi, J. (PI) ; Cho-Phan, C. (PI) ; Chu, G. (PI) ; Chua, K. (PI) ; Chung, L. (PI) ; Clarke, M. (PI) ; Clusin, W. (PI) ; Colevas, A. (PI) ; Colloff, E. (PI) ; Contopoulos-Ioannidis, D. (PI) ; Cooke, J. (PI) ; Cooper, A. (PI) ; Coutre, S. (PI) ; Crapo, L. (PI) ; Crump, C. (PI) ; Cullen, M. (PI) ; Das, A. (PI) ; Dash, R. (PI) ; Daugherty, T. (PI) ; David, S. (PI) ; Dawson, L. (PI) ; Deresinski, S. (PI) ; Desai, M. (PI) ; Desai, T. (PI) ; Dhillon, G. (PI) ; Dorman, J. (PI) ; Dosiou, C. (PI) ; Downing, N. (PI) ; DuBose, A. (PI) ; Edwards, L. (PI) ; Einav, S. (PI) ; Fantl, W. (PI) ; Farquhar, J. (PI) ; Fathman, C. (PI) ; Fearon, W. (PI) ; Feldman, D. (PI) ; Felsher, D. (PI) ; Fisher, G. (PI) ; Fitzgerald, P. (PI) ; Ford, J. (PI) ; Ford, P. (PI) ; Fowler, M. (PI) ; Frayne, S. (PI) ; Friedland, S. (PI) ; Fries, J. (PI) ; Froelicher, V. (PI) ; Gabiola, J. (PI) ; Ganjoo, K. (PI) ; Garcia, G. (PI) ; Gardner, C. (PI) ; Gardner, P. (PI) ; Gavi, B. (PI) ; Geldsetzer, P. (PI) ; Geng, L. (PI) ; Genovese, M. (PI) ; Gerson, L. (PI) ; Gesundheit, N. (PI) ; Glaseroff, A. (PI) ; Glenn, J. (PI) ; Goldhaber-Fiebert, J. (PI) ; Goldstein, M. (PI) ; Goodman, S. (PI) ; Goronzy, J. (PI) ; Gotlib, J. (PI) ; Gray, G. (PI) ; Greenberg, H. (PI) ; Greenberg, P. (PI) ; Gregory, P. (PI) ; Habtezion, A. (PI) ; Hallenbeck, J. (PI) ; Harman, S. (PI) ; Harrington, R. (PI) ; Harshman, L. (PI) ; Haskell, W. (PI) ; Heaney, C. (PI) ; Heidenreich, P. (PI) ; Henri, H. (PI) ; Ho, D. (PI) ; Hoffman, A. (PI) ; Holman, H. (PI) ; Holodniy, M. (PI) ; Hopkins, J. (PI) ; Horning, S. (PI) ; Hsia, H. (PI) ; Hunt, S. (PI) ; Ioannidis, J. (PI) ; Isom, R. (PI) ; Jernick, J. (PI) ; Ji, H. (PI) ; Johnston, L. (PI) ; Jones, E. (PI) ; Kahn, J. (PI) ; Kao, P. (PI) ; Kappagoda, S. (PI) ; Kastelein, M. (PI) ; Katz, R. (PI) ; Katzenstein, D. (PI) ; Kenny, K. (PI) ; Khatri, P. (PI) ; Khazeni, N. (PI) ; Khush, K. (PI) ; Killen, J. (PI) ; Kim, S. (PI) ; King, A. (PI) ; Kohrt, H. (PI) ; Kraemer, F. (PI) ; Krishnan, E. (PI) ; Kummar, S. (PI) ; Kunz, P. (PI) ; Kuo, C. (PI) ; Kuo, C. (PI) ; Kurian, A. (PI) ; Kuschner, W. (PI) ; Ladabaum, U. (PI) ; Lafayette, R. (PI) ; Laport, G. (PI) ; Laws, A. (PI) ; Lee, D. (PI) ; Lee, J. (PI) ; Lee, P. (PI) ; Leung, L. (PI) ; Levin, E. (PI) ; Levitt, L. (PI) ; Levy, R. (PI) ; Levy, S. (PI) ; Liang, D. (PI) ; Liedtke, M. (PI) ; Lin, B. (PI) ; Lindsay, A. (PI) ; Lorenz, K. (PI) ; Lorig, K. (PI) ; Lotfi, J. (PI) ; Lowe, A. (PI) ; Lowsky, R. (PI) ; Luby, S. (PI) ; Lutchman, G. (PI) ; Majeti, R. (PI) ; McConnell, M. (PI) ; McLaughlin, T. (PI) ; Medeiros, B. (PI) ; Meyer, T. (PI) ; Miklos, D. (PI) ; Miller, G. (PI) ; Milstein, A. (PI) ; Mitchell, B. (PI) ; Mohabir, P. (PI) ; Morioka-Douglas, N. (PI) ; Musen, M. (PI) ; Narayan, S. (PI) ; Neal, J. (PI) ; Negrin, R. (PI) ; Nevins, A. (PI) ; Nguyen, L. (PI) ; Nguyen, M. (PI) ; Nguyen, P. (PI) ; Nicolls, M. (PI) ; O' Callahan, P. (PI) ; Okafor, P. (PI) ; Osterberg, L. (PI) ; Owens, D. (PI) ; Palaniappan, L. (PI) ; Pao, A. (PI) ; Parnes, J. (PI) ; Parsonnet, J. (PI) ; Pasricha, P. (PI) ; Pegram, M. (PI) ; Periyakoil, V. (PI) ; Petersen, J. (PI) ; Phadke, A. (PI) ; Pinto, H. (PI) ; Pompei, P. (PI) ; Popp, R. (PI) ; Posley, K. (PI) ; Price, E. (PI) ; Prochaska, J. (PI) ; Puri, R. (PI) ; Quertermous, T. (PI) ; Raffin, T. (PI) ; Rehkopf, D. (PI) ; Relman, D. (PI) ; Rizk, N. (PI) ; Robinson, B. (PI) ; Rockson, S. (PI) ; Rohatgi, R. (PI) ; Rosas, L. (PI) ; Rosen, G. (PI) ; Rosenberg, S. (PI) ; Rudd, P. (PI) ; Ruoss, S. (PI) ; Rydel, T. (PI) ; Scandling, J. (PI) ; Schnittger, I. (PI) ; Schoolnik, G. (PI) ; Schroeder, J. (PI) ; Shafer, R. (PI) ; Shah, J. (PI) ; Shah, N. (PI) ; Shah, S. (PI) ; Shah, S. (PI) ; Sharp, C. (PI) ; Shen, K. (PI) ; Shieh, L. (PI) ; Shizuru, J. (PI) ; Shoor, S. (PI) ; Sikic, B. (PI) ; Singer, S. (PI) ; Singh, B. (PI) ; Singh, U. (PI) ; Skeff, K. (PI) ; Spiekerkoetter, E. (PI) ; Srinivas, S. (PI) ; Stafford, R. (PI) ; Stefanick, M. (PI) ; Stertzer, S. (PI) ; Stevens, D. (PI) ; Stockdale, F. (PI) ; Strober, S. (PI) ; Studdert, D. (PI) ; Tai, J. (PI) ; Tamura, M. (PI) ; Tan, J. (PI) ; Telli, M. (PI) ; Tepper, R. (PI) ; Tompkins, L. (PI) ; Tremmel, J. (PI) ; Triadafilopoulos, G. (PI) ; Tsao, P. (PI) ; Upadhyay, D. (PI) ; Utz, P. (PI) ; Vagelos, R. (PI) ; Valantine, H. (PI) ; Verghese, A. (PI) ; Wakelee, H. (PI) ; Wang, P. (PI) ; Warvariv, V. (PI) ; Weill, D. (PI) ; Weinacker, A. (PI) ; Weng, K. (PI) ; Weng, W. (PI) ; Weyand, C. (PI) ; Wheeler, M. (PI) ; Wiedmann, T. (PI) ; Winkelmayer, W. (PI) ; Winkleby, M. (PI) ; Winograd, C. (PI) ; Winslow, D. (PI) ; Winter, T. (PI) ; Witteles, R. (PI) ; Wu, J. (PI) ; Wu, J. (PI) ; Wu, S. (PI) ; Yabu, J. (PI) ; Yang, P. (PI) ; Yeung, A. (PI) ; Yock, P. (PI) ; Zamanian, R. (PI) ; Zehnder, J. (PI) ; Zei, P. (PI) ; Zolopa, A. (PI) ; Zulman, D. (PI) ; de Jesus Perez, V. (PI) ; Gardner, C. (SI)

MED 218: Principles of Business Strategy

Organizations need frameworks to plan for growth, respond to challenges and/or changes in the market, or tackle gaps in performance. This course explores how to assess business opportunities in dynamic, competitive environments to develop the insights that can lead to success. The frameworks developed in this course apply to for-profit and not-for-profit firms in the health care industry including provider organizations, pharmaceutical and medical device firms, payers, and information technology firms. In the course, students will explore the complexity of analyzing markets and assessing business strategy in an era of globalization and increasing uncertainty. Must have active enrollment within the Master of Clinical Informatics Management program.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3

MED 220: Bioethical Challenges of New Technology

How might we apply ideas from ethical theory to contemporary issues and debates in biotechnology? This course will provide critical encounters with some of the central topics in the field of bioethics, with an emphasis on new technologies. Controversies over genetic engineering, stem cell research, reproductive technologies, and genetic testing will provide an opportunity for you to critically assess arguments and evidence. We will begin with an overview of the field and the theoretical approaches to bioethics that have been derived from philosophy. You will then have the opportunity to engage in debate and learn how to identify underlying values and how to apply ideas from ethical theory to contemporary problems. Prerequisites: Must have active enrollment within the Master of Clinical Informatics Management program.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1
Instructors: Magnus, D. (PI)

MED 248: Student Rounds

Teams of preclinical students meet weekly with a clinical student to hear the history and physical of a recent case the clinical student encountered on the wards. Following the presentation, the preclinical students work together under the guidance of the clinical student to develop a problem list and plan, which are then compared with the problem list, plan, and orders made by the actual admitting team. In the course of presenting the cases, the clinical student describes personal experiences and practical components of ward work and daily clinical routine.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Kenny, K. (PI)

MED 255: The Responsible Conduct of Research

Forum. How to identify and approach ethical dilemmas that commonly arise in biomedical research. Issues in the practice of research such as in publication and interpretation of data, and issues raised by academic/industry ties. Contemporary debates at the interface of biomedical science and society regarding research on stem cells, bioweapons, genetic testing, human subjects, and vertebrate animals. Completion fulfills NIH/ADAMHA requirement for instruction in the ethical conduct of research. Prerequisite: research experience recommended. Intensive format, 1-day course, register for only one section. One pre-class assignment required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1

MED 257: Yoga: Technologies for Transformation

Yoga is a technology to bring the body and mind to the peak of their capabilities, allowing one to live life to the fullest. This course is a series of six interactive webinars that provide you with simple but powerful tools to enhance your health and experience a sense of harmony within yourself and with the world around you. Topics include sleep, food, mental health, respiratory health, success and diversity and inclusion, approached from a yogic perspective. You will gain insights from timeless yogic wisdom, learn Upa Yoga(Invigorating Yogic postures), Kriya (Balancing breathing methods) and guided meditations. The techniques are from a world-renowned school of yoga-Isha Foundation and are non-religious and science based. The course's objective is to equip you with a toolkit that can be easily practiced within 5-15 minutes and provide insights to help you make every aspect of life a stepping stone for wellness. The sessions do not require any fitness level or previous exposure to yoga. The practices can be done sitting on a chair and are designed by Sadhguru, yogi, visionary and New York Times bestselling author. nA yoga mat is recommended (optional).
Terms: Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

MED 258: Stanford Technology Access Resource Team: A Primary Care Effort to Bridge the Telehealth Divide

Video visits have been invaluable during the COVID pandemic for patients and providers and will continue to serve as a vital connection between patients and their care team beyond COVID-19. However, many patients cannot access this resource due to challenges with technology. This course will give students an opportunity to explore concepts in communication, community-building, design thinking, and team-based patient care while providing a service that will connect vulnerable patients and their caregivers to health care providers through video visits. This asynchronous course consists of recorded didactic sessions and opportunities for undergraduates and graduate students to interact with patients at Stanford and in the community through our community partners. Please note that regular use of the phone and internet are required and may not be the best option for those who are residing out of the country. MD Students should enroll in FAMMED 280.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable 10 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: Cuan, N. (PI)

MED 264: Covid-19 Case Investigation and Contact Tracing (CHPR 235, MED 164)

In this service-learning course students will be learn how to identify people who have COVID-19 and those who have been exposed to people with COVID-19. Students will learn basics about the biology and health effects of SARS-CoV-2 and the epidemiology of COVID-19. Students will be taught important skills in healthcare communication including motivational interviewing, health education, and health coaching. Students will work as volunteers together with Santa Clara County staff to interrupt the chains of transmission of COVID-19 as they apply skills they have learned to help people with the illness and those who have been exposed understand the importance of isolation, quarantine, and other critical aspects of public health needed to control and manage this disease. Students will need to be willing to commit 20 hours per week to this course for 10 weeks over 2 quarters. Requires application and instructor approval. Please contact Course Director, Lars Osterberg MD, MPH for an application form and approval for enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 3-6 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 18 units total)
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