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1 - 10 of 15 results for: COMPLIT ; Currently searching summer courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

COMPLIT 51Q: Comparative Fictions of Ethnicity (AMSTUD 51Q, CSRE 51Q)

We may "know" "who" we "are," but we are, after all, social creatures. How does our sense of self interact with those around us? How does literature provide a particular medium for not only self expression, but also for meditations on what goes into the construction of "the Self"? After all, don't we tell stories in response to the question, "who are you"? Besides a list of nouns and names and attributes, we give our lives flesh and blood in telling how we process the world. Our course focuses in particular on this question--Does this universal issue ("who am I") become skewed differently when we add a qualifier before it, like "ethnic"? Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take course for a Letter Grade.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED, Writing 2

COMPLIT 100: CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People (DLCL 100, FRENCH 175, GERMAN 175, HISTORY 206E, ILAC 175, ITALIAN 175, URBANST 153)

This course takes students on a trip to major capital cities, at different moments in time: Renaissance Florence, Golden Age Madrid, Colonial Mexico City, Enlightenment and Romantic Paris, Existential and Revolutionary St. Petersburg, Roaring Berlin, Modernist Vienna, and bustling Buenos Aires. While exploring each place in a particular historical moment, we will also consider the relations between culture, power, and social life. How does the cultural life of a country intersect with the political activity of a capital? How do large cities shape our everyday experience, our aesthetic preferences, and our sense of history? Why do some cities become cultural capitals? Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents (in translation); authors we will read include Boccaccio, Dante, Sor Juana, Montesquieu, Baudelaire, Gogol, Irmgard Keun, Freud, and Borges. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a Letter Grade.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

COMPLIT 101: What Is Comparative Literature?

How can we best talk about literature? What exactly is literature? What is theory? What is comparison? How do these questions fit into our lives? This course is an introduction to Comparative Literature suitable for all students. We will think about poetry, translation, trans feminism (and more), and we will read Maria Lugones, Etel Adnan, Hortense Spillers, and others. This course will be taught online and asynchronously; there will be recorded lectures, the bulk of the discussion will take place in live small groups, and students will submit regular recorded presentations in addition to writing and revising a paper.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

COMPLIT 123: The Novel and the World (DLCL 143)

The European Design of the Novel. The course will trace the development of the modern literary genre par excellence through some of its great milestones from the 17th century to the present. Works by Cervantes, Austen, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Queirós, Kafka, Woolf, Verga, and Rodoreda.
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

COMPLIT 123A: Resisting Coloniality: Then and Now (ILAC 123A)

What are the different shapes that Western colonialism took over the centuries? How did people resist the symbolic and material oppressions engendered by such colonialist endeavors? This course offers a deep dive into history of the emergence of Western colonialism (alt: Spanish and Portuguese empires) by focusing on literary and cultural strategies of resisting coloniality in Latin America, from the 16th century to the present. Students will examine critiques of empire through a vast array of sources (novel, letter, short story, sermon, history, essay), spanning from early modern denunciations of the oppression of indigenous and enslaved peoples to modern Latin American answers to the three dominant cultural paradigms in post-independence period: Spain, France, and the United States. Through an examination of different modes of resistance, students will learn to identify the relation between Western colonialism and the discriminatory discourses that divided people based on their class more »
What are the different shapes that Western colonialism took over the centuries? How did people resist the symbolic and material oppressions engendered by such colonialist endeavors? This course offers a deep dive into history of the emergence of Western colonialism (alt: Spanish and Portuguese empires) by focusing on literary and cultural strategies of resisting coloniality in Latin America, from the 16th century to the present. Students will examine critiques of empire through a vast array of sources (novel, letter, short story, sermon, history, essay), spanning from early modern denunciations of the oppression of indigenous and enslaved peoples to modern Latin American answers to the three dominant cultural paradigms in post-independence period: Spain, France, and the United States. Through an examination of different modes of resistance, students will learn to identify the relation between Western colonialism and the discriminatory discourses that divided people based on their class, gender, ethnicity, and race, and whose effects are still impactful for many groups of people nowadays. Authors may include Isabel Guevara, Catalina de Erauso, el Inca Garcilaso, Sor Juana, Simón Bolívar, Flora Tristán, Silvina Ocampo, Jorge Luis Borges, and Gabriel García Márquez. Taught in Spanish.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

COMPLIT 126C: Literature, Data, and AI

What kind of data is literature? What different methods are available to scholars who work with it, and what are the philosophical assumptions that underpin those methods? In this course, we will survey major critical approaches to literature from the last century as well as emerging methods from the digital humanities, and try them out for ourselves. Students will construct their own portfolio of texts and each week they will (re)analyze them using a different approach; they will record their findings and reflect on their experiences in a weekly log. The course will comprise asynchronous activities (lectures, presentations, assignments, readings) and one synchronous meeting per week to discuss the readings. Approaches may include: formalism, structuralism, Marxism, psychoanalysis, critical approaches to identity and performance (gender, race, sexuality and disability), network analysis, topic modeling, stylometry, and word embeddings. No prior programming knowledge is expected. This course will not offer detailed training in computational analysis; rather, the focus will be on the theoretical implications of computational tools. All readings will be in English.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

COMPLIT 132A: Nostalgia as a Global Form

The course will explore the waves of nostalgia that have swept the globe in the past decades. We will look at contemporary expressions of nostalgia across different media, including literature, cinema, art, spoken word, street art and social media. We will examine nostalgic narratives related to a variety of cultural phenomena such as exile, migration, colonialism, globalization and technological advancements. We will focus on case studies from various countries such as Israel, the former Soviet Union, India and the UK, and explore them in their specific cultural context, while also exploring nostalgia as a global trend of Late Modernity. Our readings will be accompanied by fundamental theoretical texts on nostalgia, including writings by Svetlana Boym, Fred Davis, Zygmunt Bauman and others.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3

COMPLIT 133A: Literature and Society in Africa and the Caribbean (AFRICAAM 133, AFRICAST 132, COMPLIT 233A, CSRE 133E, FRENCH 133, JEWISHST 143)

This course provides students with an introductory survey of literature and cinema from Francophone Africa and the Caribbean in the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will be encouraged to consider the geographical, historical, and political connections between the Maghreb, the Caribbean, and Sub-Saharan Africa by reading course materials, completing writing assignments, participating in class activities, listening to contextualizing lectures, and conducting student-led presentations. This course will help students improve their ability to speak and write in French by introducing students to new academic registers, vocabulary, and syntax. While analyzing novels and films, students will be exposed to a diverse number of intersectional topics such as national and cultural identity, race and class, gender and sexuality, orality and textuality, transnationalism and migration, colonialism and decolonization, history and memory, and the politics of language. Readings include the works of writ more »
This course provides students with an introductory survey of literature and cinema from Francophone Africa and the Caribbean in the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will be encouraged to consider the geographical, historical, and political connections between the Maghreb, the Caribbean, and Sub-Saharan Africa by reading course materials, completing writing assignments, participating in class activities, listening to contextualizing lectures, and conducting student-led presentations. This course will help students improve their ability to speak and write in French by introducing students to new academic registers, vocabulary, and syntax. While analyzing novels and films, students will be exposed to a diverse number of intersectional topics such as national and cultural identity, race and class, gender and sexuality, orality and textuality, transnationalism and migration, colonialism and decolonization, history and memory, and the politics of language. Readings include the works of writers and filmmakers such as Aimé Césaire, Albert Memmi, Assia Djebar, Dani Laferrière, Djibril Tamsir Niane, Fatou Diome, Leïla Sebbar, Léopold Senghor, Mariama Bâ, Maryse Condé, and Ousmane Sembène. Taught in French. Students are encouraged to complete FRENLANG 124 or to successfully test above this level through the Language Center.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

COMPLIT 194: Independent Research

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

COMPLIT 207: Why is Climate Change Un-believable? Interdisciplinary Approaches to Environmental Action

The science is there. The evidence is there. Why do people still refuse to recognize one of the greatest threats to human existence? Why can't, why won't they believe the truth? The time to act is slowly evaporating before our eyes. To answer this question requires an interdisciplinary approach that investigates many of the ways global warming has been analyzed, imagined, represented, and evaluated. Thus we welcome students of any major willing to embark on this common project and to participate fully. We will challenge ourselves to move between and amongst texts that are familiar and those we will bring into the conversation. There will be much that we miss, but we hope this course will at least begin a serious conversation in a unique way. The course will run on two parallel tracks: on the one hand, we will delve into textual representations and arguments; on the other hand, we will attempt to develop a sensibility for how climate change makes itself manifest in the physical world through a series of workshops and site visits in the Bay Area. The first track of this course will center on the discussion of three science fiction novels: The Hungry Tide by Amitav Ghosh, The Three Body Problem by Cixin Liu, and Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler. The second track of this course is comprised of a series of workshops that aims to develop spatial and material literacy relevant to climate change awareness. It will engage topics such as: scale, atmosphere, measure, material reciprocity, and garbage repurposing. One of the primary goals of this course is to not only understand the problem of climate change, but also how to best act upon it. Thus the required final assignment for this class can be a recommendation for action based on a critical review of the topic of climate change and already existing activism. It can take the form of a paper, a video, an installation art project, a podcast, etc.. But in all cases your work must analytically engage the specific medium of literary expression.
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
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