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1 - 10 of 41 results for: CEE ; Currently searching summer courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CEE 70: Environmental Science and Technology (ENGR 90)

Introduction to environmental quality and the technical background necessary for understanding environmental issues, controlling environmental degradation, and preserving air and water quality. Material balance concepts for tracking substances in the environmental and engineering systems.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR

CEE 101E: Introduction to Mechanics of Fluids

Physical properties of fluids and their effect on flow behavior; equations of motion for incompressible ideal flow, including the special case of hydrostatics; continuity, energy, and momentum principles; control volume analysis; laminar and turbulent flows; internal and external flows in specific engineering applications including pipes and open channels; elements of boundary-layer theory. Prerequisites: E14, Physics 41, Math 51, or CME 100.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3

CEE 107S: Understanding Energy - Essentials (CEE 207S)

Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. Students will learn the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- and will be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, hydrogen, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 3 units, which includes lecture, readings and videos, and homewor more »
Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. Students will learn the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- and will be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, hydrogen, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 3 units, which includes lecture, readings and videos, and homework assignments. This is a course for all: pre-majors and majors, with any background - no prior energy knowledge necessary. For a course that covers all of this plus goes more in-depth, check out CEE 107A/207A/ EarthSys 103 Understanding Energy offered in the autumn and spring quarters (students should not take both for credit). Website: https://energy.stanford.edu/understanding-energy Prerequisites: Algebra.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

CEE 120A: Building Modeling for Design & Construction (CEE 220A)

The foundational Building Information Modeling course introduces techniques for creating, managing, and applying of building information models in the building design and construction process. The course covers processes and tools for creating, organizing, and working with 2D and 3D computer representations of building components and geometries to produce models used in architectural design, construction planning and documentation, rendering and visualization, simulation, and analysis.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 3
Instructors: Katz, G. (PI)

CEE 146S: Engineering Economics and Sustainability (ENGR 60)

Engineering Economics is a subset of the field of economics that draws upon the logic of economics, but adds that analytical power of mathematics and statistics. The concepts developed in this course are broadly applicable to many professional and personal decisions, including making purchasing decisions, deciding between project alternatives, evaluating different processes, and balancing environmental and social costs against economic costs. The concepts taught in this course will be increasingly valuable as students climb the carrier ladder in private industry, a non-governmental organization, a public agency, or in founding their own startup. Eventually, the ability to make informed decisions that are based in fundamental analysis of alternatives is a part of every career. As such, this course is recommended for engineering and non-engineering students alike. This course is taught exclusively online in every quarter it is offered. (Prerequisites: MATH 19 or 20 or approved equivalent.)
Terms: Aut, Spr, Sum | Units: 3
Instructors: Lepech, M. (PI)

CEE 170: Aquatic and Organic Chemistry for Environmental Engineering (CEE 270M)

This course provides a solid foundation in the most important aspects of general, aquatic and organic chemistry. Nearly all of aspects environmental engineering apply the chemistry concepts discussed in this course. Given that each of the chemistry subjects to be addressed are standalone classes, this class highlights only the most relevant material to environmental engineering. The class focuses on developing general background skills needed for subsequent classes in environmental engineering focusing on their applications, although certain applications will be discussed for illustration.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3
Instructors: Mitch, W. (PI)

CEE 176G: Sustainability Design Thinking (CEE 276G)

Application design thinking to make sustainability compelling, impactful and realizable. Analysis of contextual, functional and human-centered design thinking techniques to promote sustainable design of products and environments by holistically considering space, form, environment, energy, economics, and health. Includes Studio project work in prototyping, modeling, testing, and realizing sustainable design ideas.
Terms: Sum | Units: 3

CEE 198: Directed Reading or Special Studies in Civil Engineering

Written report or oral presentation required. Students must obtain a faculty sponsor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit

CEE 199: Undergraduate Research in Civil and Environmental Engineering

Written report or oral presentation required. Students must obtain a faculty sponsor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit

CEE 199C: Independent Research in Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE 299C)

Enrollment restricted to CEE students enrolling in classes via SCPD. Directed study of a topic in civil and environmental engineering, under the supervision of a CEE professor. Students enrolling must email Profs. Lepech and Hildemann, cc'ing their research supervisor, to indicate with which CEE faculty member they will be working.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit
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