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201 - 210 of 253 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 416: Bernini and Baroque Rome

This seminar examines the career of Gianlorenzo Bernini (1598-1680), sculptor, architect, painter, stage designer and playwright, the premier artist of the popes. It will examine his cultural, political and religious milieu and lay particular emphasis on the theoretical relations between the arts that his oeuvre is seen to embody. In the process it will also review the genre of artistic biography, the historiography of the baroque and the myths of dynamism, theatricality, eroticism (and others) always associated with the period, and Bernini's work in particular. Limited to PhD students in Art History and Film Studies, and advanced undergraduates with permission of instructor.
Last offered: Autumn 2015

ARTHIST 416A: Michelangelo Architect (CEE 33A, ITALIAN 216)

The architecture of Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564), "Father and Master of all the Arts," redefined the possibilities of architectural expression for generations. This course considers his civic, ecclesiastic, and palatial works. It proceeds from his beginnings in Medicean Florence to his fulfillment in Papal Rome. It examines the anxiety of influence following his death and his enduring legacy in modernism. Topics include: Michelangelo's debt to Classical and Early Renaissance prototypes; his transformation of the canon; the iterative sketch as disegno; architecture and the body; the queering of architectural language; sketch, scale, and materiality; Modernism and Michelangelo. The historiography of Michelangelo has predominantly favored studies in painting and sculpture. Our focus on architecture encourages students to test new ideas and alternative approaches to his work.
Last offered: Winter 2017

ARTHIST 417B: The Classical Theory of Architecture from Antiquity to the French Revolution (ARTHIST 217B)

This seminar focuses on themes and theories in architectural design from antiquity until the early twentieth century. Modern and contemporary architecture has often claimed its modernity through the incorporation of theory, but this seminar examines selections from key texts that have also moulded architectural and urbanistic thought in the ancient, medieval, and early modern eras in combination with analytical comparisons of built architecture.
Last offered: Autumn 2015

ARTHIST 419: The Poetics of Softness

This seminar probes the meaning of softness in the theory and practice of early modern Southern European art. As this seminar will investigate, softness is intrinsically tied to the creative process, to the challenges of visualization and art making. What does it mean for a sculptor to depict fingers digging into marble flesh? How did the painter rise to the challenge of depicting subtle forms - clouds, atmosphere, the beating pulse, hair and animal fur? Why were some of the first histories of art relayed as the progression from hard to soft forms? Through the investigation of the concepts and artworks of artists such as Leonardo, Giorgione, Raphael, Correggio, and Bernini, this seminar will explore softness as an aesthetic category. Materiality, enlivenment, perfection and imperfection in art theory, old-age style, and the ekphrastic tradition will be topics of particular interest. Participants are invited to pursue research papers in their fields of specialty.
Last offered: Spring 2017

ARTHIST 422: Reception and Literacy in Roman Art (CLASSICS 373)

(Formerly CLASSART 322.) Beyond a focus on artists and patrons: how Roman art was seen and understood by its contemporary viewers. Themes include memory, performance, gender, replication, and constructions of space. Goal is to draft a differentiated model of viewing and literacy, with attention to collective experience, hierarchy, access, and subversion.
Last offered: Spring 2015

ARTHIST 423: Living in the Material World: Imagination and Agency (ARTHIST 223)

This seminar deals with the materials that artists have chosen in art and construction from antiquity to the early modern era. The particular focus is upon pre-modern perceptions of the inherent properties of materials, from amber and ivory to marble and granite, as well as the diverse ways in which societies have associated particular substances with social and cultural values. Particular emphasis is laid upon the architectural use of materials.
Last offered: Spring 2017

ARTHIST 423B: Art That Moves: Affect, Kinesis, Mobility, 1300-1700

The early modern artist who imbues his subjects with movement is praised by his critics above all others, for he can do what is impossible: give life to dead matter. Movement is sometimes suggested, a trick of the eye that leads the spectator to anticipate a moment just about to unfold. Other times, the artist is said to conjure a living figure, whose flesh trembles with breath and a beating pulse. This seminar explores these and other examples of movement, instances that negotiate the relationship between depicted and actual movement with the emotion it stirs (affect). We will also study movement¿s relation to narrative and descriptive language (history and ekphrasis), and art¿s ability to move through time (Warburg¿s Pathosformel) and space (artworks and artists that travel). A study of movement uncovers multiple contradictions and possibilities in the history of art.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Kinew, S. (PI)

ARTHIST 426: NARRATIVE THEORY & VISUAL FORM

The theoretical terrain of narrative studies in literary criticism and historiography. The critical implications of narrative analysis for the writing of history in general. Readings integrated with students' current research projects.
Last offered: Spring 2013

ARTHIST 429: Vienna and Hamburg : Readings in the Science of Art History

The place of art history in a university curriculum was established in Europe only during the course of the nineteenth century, and only after demonstrating that its methods are rigorous and that its goals have little to do with subjective connoisseurship or personal taste. The ambition was to develop a properly ¿scientific¿ [wissenschaftlich] practice able to claim legitimacy among the traditional disciplines of university study and research. Two German-speaking centers were critical to this development : the Institute for Austrian Historical Research in Vienna and the Warburg Library for the Science of Culture at the University of Hamburg. The best-known author of the first is Alois Riegl, while the second counts Aby Warburg, Erwin Panofsky, and Ernst Cassirer among its members. Recent books on both centers, and the availability of texts in English by others of each group now make it possible to revisit their debates about ¿scientific¿ art history that shaped the field as we know it today. This seminar will read closely a selection of these texts with the aim of understanding more fully our own intellectual history and its impact upon discussions concerning the place of our discipline within the humanities today.
Last offered: Winter 2016

ARTHIST 432: Rethinking American Art

A re-examination of American art of the 18th and 19th centuries, focusing on works in the collection of the de Young Museum, San Francisco. The class will meet weekly at the de Young, where we will be joined by Professor Margaretta Lovell and students from the University of California, Berkeley. Each student will pursue an in-depth study of a single work in the Museum's superb American collections, using documents of social and cultural history. We will pay particular attention to recent scholarship, questions of genre (landscape, portrait, still life and images of everyday life), and the "biography of objects" (the way works of art shift in context and interpretation over time).nGraduate seminar open to advanced undergraduates with the instructor¿s approval.
Last offered: Autumn 2013
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