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1 - 10 of 289 results for: VPGE::* ; Currently searching offered courses. You can also include unoffered courses

AFRICAAM 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (CSRE 245, EDUC 245, PSYCH 245A)

This seminar will explore the impact and relative salience of racial/ethnic identity on select issues including: discrimination, social justice, mental health and academic performance. Theoretical perspectives on identity development will be reviewed, along with research on other social identity variables, such as social class, gender and regional identifications. New areas within this field such as the complexity of multiracial identity status and intersectional invisibility will also be discussed. Though the class will be rooted in psychology and psychological models of identity formation, no prior exposure to psychology is assumed and other disciplines-including cultural studies, feminist studies, and literature-will be incorporated into the course materials. Students will work with community partners to better understand the nuances of racial and ethnic identity development in different contexts. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

AFRICAAM 269: Black Studies Matter (AFRICAAM 69)

This interdisciplinary course will introduce students to ten foundational texts in Black Studies, including classic works by Toni Morrison, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, C. L. R. James, W. E. B. DuBois, and Audre Lorde. The discussions will connect these texts to contemporary conversations about Black feminism, Black politics, mass incarceration, policing, and Black life in America in the twenty-first century. We welcome a wide range of students to enroll in this class: undergraduates and graduate students and members of the larger Stanford community who would like to gain a deeper understanding of Black Studies. This class is particularly urgent in our current moment. Taken together, the selected readings will provide critical historical and cultural context to grasp the meanings of our own tumultuous times. n nThis course draws on primary sources that reveal the centrality of Black Studies to understanding our world and the major themes that animate our lives: history, identity, more »
This interdisciplinary course will introduce students to ten foundational texts in Black Studies, including classic works by Toni Morrison, James Baldwin, Lorraine Hansberry, C. L. R. James, W. E. B. DuBois, and Audre Lorde. The discussions will connect these texts to contemporary conversations about Black feminism, Black politics, mass incarceration, policing, and Black life in America in the twenty-first century. We welcome a wide range of students to enroll in this class: undergraduates and graduate students and members of the larger Stanford community who would like to gain a deeper understanding of Black Studies. This class is particularly urgent in our current moment. Taken together, the selected readings will provide critical historical and cultural context to grasp the meanings of our own tumultuous times. n nThis course draws on primary sources that reveal the centrality of Black Studies to understanding our world and the major themes that animate our lives: history, identity, memory, gender, sexuality, belonging, exclusion, and the varied responses and forms of resistance to four hundred years of racial oppression. These texts invite students to delve deeply into the lived experiences of African Americans across time periods, class positions, sexual orientations, and geographic locations. The lectures and discussions are led by faculty in African and African American Studies (AAAS), Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE), History, Theater and Performance Studies, English, and Philosophy.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

ANTHRO 320A: Race, Ethnicity, and Language: Racial, Ethnic, and Linguistic Formations (CSRE 389A, EDUC 389A, LINGUIST 253)

Language, as a cultural resource for shaping our identities, is central to the concepts of race and ethnicity. This seminar explores the linguistic construction of race and ethnicity across a wide variety of contexts and communities. We begin with an examination of the concepts of race and ethnicity and what it means to be "doing race," both as scholarship and as part of our everyday lives. Throughout the course, we will take a comparative perspective and highlight how different racial/ethnic formations (Asian, Black, Latino, Native American, White, etc.) participate in similar, yet different, ways of drawing racial and ethnic distinctions. The seminar will draw heavily on scholarship in (linguistic) anthropology, sociolinguistics and education. We will explore how we talk and don't talk about race, how we both position ourselves and are positioned by others, how the way we talk can have real consequences on the trajectory of our lives, and how, despite this, we all participate in maintaining racial and ethnic hierarchies and inequality more generally, particularly in schools.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Rosa, J. (PI)

ANTHRO 362: Visual Activism and Social Justice

Anthropology and the academy more generally have long valued text, language, and cognition more highly than the image, visuality, and the imagination. Yet, contemporary political movements and strategies for social justice and transformation vividly demonstrate why effective social research needs to study both.nPre-requisite by instructor consent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Malkki, L. (PI)

ARTHIST 405A: Graduate Pedagogy

This course is designed for graduate students in Art History and Film Studies preparing to work as teaching assistants in the Department of Art and Art History. The seminar will focus on a range of theoretical and practical concerns pertaining to the successful conceptualization, organization, and execution of class lectures and discussion sections. Students will be exposed to a variety of perspectives and strategies related to quality teaching at the college level.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2
Instructors: Levi, P. (PI)

BIO 290: Teaching Practicum in Biology

Open to upper-division undergraduates and graduate students. Practical, supervised teaching experience in a biology lab or lecture course. Training often includes attending lectures, initiating and planning discussion sections, and assisting in the preparation course materials. May be repeated for credit.nPrerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

BIO 291: Development and Teaching of Core Experimental Laboratories

Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Malladi, S. (PI)

BIOE 273: Biodesign for Digital Health

BioE 273 Summer Quarter enrollment is open only to students in the Masters of Science in Clinical Informatics Management (MCiM) program. It builds on the core course but is targeted at working professionals seeking to harness the power of digital innovations to deliver high-quality, cost-effective healthcare. The course is offered through Stanford Biodesign and reflects the belief that innovation is a process that can be learned, practiced, and perfected; and it all starts with an unmet need. This class offering gives leaders the innovation toolset to drive transformational change in healthcare systems, life sciences businesses, start-ups, and healthcare-focused technology organizations. Over the course of 10 weeks, students will learn about digital health and the Biodesign need-driven innovation process through a dynamic approach that includes lectures, panel discussions, and breakout sessions. The experts represent start-ups, corporations, venture capital firms, accelerators, researc more »
BioE 273 Summer Quarter enrollment is open only to students in the Masters of Science in Clinical Informatics Management (MCiM) program. It builds on the core course but is targeted at working professionals seeking to harness the power of digital innovations to deliver high-quality, cost-effective healthcare. The course is offered through Stanford Biodesign and reflects the belief that innovation is a process that can be learned, practiced, and perfected; and it all starts with an unmet need. This class offering gives leaders the innovation toolset to drive transformational change in healthcare systems, life sciences businesses, start-ups, and healthcare-focused technology organizations. Over the course of 10 weeks, students will learn about digital health and the Biodesign need-driven innovation process through a dynamic approach that includes lectures, panel discussions, and breakout sessions. The experts represent start-ups, corporations, venture capital firms, accelerators, research labs, health organizations, and more. Student teams will take real-world unmet needs in health and healthcare and learn how to apply Biodesign innovation principles to research and evaluate needs, ideate solutions, and objectively assess them against key criteria for satisfying the needs. Again, Summer Quarter enrollment is exclusively for registered MCiM students only. MCiM students must choose Letter Grade. The schedule of class days/times/room #s are listed here: https://stanford.io/31gsL1u
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 4

BIOE 374A: Biodesign Innovation: Needs Finding and Concept Creation (ME 368A, MED 272A)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and int more »
In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are required to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of 50 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

BIOE 374B: Biodesign Innovation: Concept Development and Implementation (ME 368B, MED 272B)

In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and int more »
In this two-quarter course series ( BIOE 374A/B, MED 272A/B, ME 368A/B, OIT 384/5), multidisciplinary student teams identify real-world unmet healthcare needs, invent new health technologies to address them, and plan for their implementation into patient care. During the first quarter (winter), students select and characterize an important unmet healthcare problem, validate it through primary interviews and secondary research, and then brainstorm and screen initial technology-based solutions. In the second quarter (spring), teams select a lead solution and move it toward the market through prototyping, technical re-risking, strategies to address healthcare-specific requirements (regulation, reimbursement), and business planning. Final presentations in winter and spring are made to a panel of prominent health technology experts and/or investors. Class sessions include faculty-led instruction and case studies, coaching sessions by industry specialists, expert guest lecturers, and interactive team meetings. Enrollment is by application only, and students are required to participate in both quarters of the course. Visit http://biodesign.stanford.edu/programs/stanford-courses/biodesign-innovation.html to access the application, examples of past projects, and student testimonials. More information about Stanford Biodesign, which has led to the creation of 50 venture-backed healthcare companies and has helped hundreds of student launch health technology careers, can be found at http://biodesign.stanford.edu/.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
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