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1 - 10 of 304 results for: CSI::certificate

AFRICAAM 106: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (CSRE 103B, EDUC 103B, EDUC 337)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Artiles, A. (PI)

AFRICAST 300: Contemporary Issues in African Studies

Guest scholars present analyses of major African themes and topics. Brief response papers required. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Hubbard, L. (PI)

ALP 301: Data-Driven Impact

This is a team-based course where students will work on a project to improve a product using data and experimentation. We will cover key considerations for designing and executing high-quality research for product innovation to drive business outcomes and social impact. Students will have the opportunity to apply methods from machine learning and causal inference to a real-world scenario provided by a partner organization. Topics include designing research and experiments, data analysis, experimental and non-experimental methods for estimating the impact of product features, as well as management consideration for the delivery of actionable research. The course involves three weekly meetings: two lectures and one lab. Lectures will focus on research methods and will provide examples of research outputs for students to discuss and evaluate. Labs will comprise technical training in data analysis and structured team meetings. Students will work in cross-functional teams of 5-6 with milest more »
This is a team-based course where students will work on a project to improve a product using data and experimentation. We will cover key considerations for designing and executing high-quality research for product innovation to drive business outcomes and social impact. Students will have the opportunity to apply methods from machine learning and causal inference to a real-world scenario provided by a partner organization. Topics include designing research and experiments, data analysis, experimental and non-experimental methods for estimating the impact of product features, as well as management consideration for the delivery of actionable research. The course involves three weekly meetings: two lectures and one lab. Lectures will focus on research methods and will provide examples of research outputs for students to discuss and evaluate. Labs will comprise technical training in data analysis and structured team meetings. Students will work in cross-functional teams of 5-6 with milestones throughout the quarter. The final deliverable will be a presentation that highlights the team's work and delivers actionable recommendations that draw from the team's research. The class will include a mix of students with different backgrounds and skills. Each team will have at least one member with significant experience with data analysis. This course is part of the GSB's new Action Learning Program, in which you will work on real business challenges under the guidance of faculty. In this intensive project-based course, you will: Learn research-validated foundations, tools, and practices, Apply these tools and learnings to a real project for an external organization, Create value for the organization by providing insights and deliverables, Be an ambassador to the organization by exposing them to the talent, values, and expertise of the GSB. You will also have the opportunity to: Gain practical industry experience and exposure to the organization, its industry, and the space in which it operates, Build relationships in the organization and industry, and gain an understanding of related career paths. Prerequisites: Some experience with statistical analysis and the R statistical package. Students with less experience will have an opportunity to catch up through tutorials provided through the course. Non-GSB students are expected to have an advanced understanding of tools and methods from data science and machine learning as well as a strong familiarity with R, Python, SQL, and other similar high-level programming languages. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Athey, S. (PI)

ALP 303: Financial Analysis for Impact

This team-based course, part of the GSB's Action Learning Program, will involve projects in which students work with nonprofit organizations and investment funds to optimize decisions for positive social and environmental impact alongside business performance. This course will provide real-world opportunities for students to learn research-validated foundations, tools, and practices; apply these tools and learnings to a real project for an external organization; create value for the organization by providing insights and deliverables; and be an ambassador to the organization by exposing them to the talent, values, and expertise of the GSB. Students will also have the opportunity to gain practical industry experience and exposure to the organization, its industry, and the space in which it operates; build relationships in the organization and industry; and gain an understanding of related career paths. Project topics may include assessing the financial viability of an initiative and/or more »
This team-based course, part of the GSB's Action Learning Program, will involve projects in which students work with nonprofit organizations and investment funds to optimize decisions for positive social and environmental impact alongside business performance. This course will provide real-world opportunities for students to learn research-validated foundations, tools, and practices; apply these tools and learnings to a real project for an external organization; create value for the organization by providing insights and deliverables; and be an ambassador to the organization by exposing them to the talent, values, and expertise of the GSB. Students will also have the opportunity to gain practical industry experience and exposure to the organization, its industry, and the space in which it operates; build relationships in the organization and industry; and gain an understanding of related career paths. Project topics may include assessing the financial viability of an initiative and/or the financial health of a nonprofit organization; analyzing an impact investment, including modeling the economic and social value of outcomes; or creating a development plan within the context of the organization¿s mission and overall financial sustainability. All students will critically examine current impact measurement frameworks and gain hands-on experience in performance measurement and investment evaluation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

AMSTUD 123X: Introduction to American Politics and Policy: In Defense of Democracy (POLISCI 102, PUBLPOL 101, PUBLPOL 201)

This is a course about American politics. Traditionally, it has been taught as an introduction to various concepts and theoretical frameworks that help us understand the foundations of our political system. We take a different approach. In recent years, American democracy has faced a series of unprecedented challenges. Our objective is to work together to identify the greatest areas of weakness in the American political system, make sense of the most pressing threats facing democracy, and contemplate how democracy might be saved.
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

AMSTUD 165: History of Higher Education in the U.S. (EDUC 165, EDUC 265, HISTORY 158C)

Major periods of evolution, particularly since the mid-19th century. Premise: insights into contemporary higher education can be obtained through its antecedents, particularly regarding issues of governance, mission, access, curriculum, and the changing organization of colleges and universities.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Levine, E. (PI)

ANTHRO 123C: "Third World Problems?" Environmental Justice Around the World (CSRE 123C)

As the Flint, Michigan water situation began to attract attention and condemnation, Michigan State Representative, Sheldon Neeley, describing the troops on the ground and the Red Cross distributing water bottles, said that the Governor had "turned an American city into a Third World country [...] it's terrible what he's done [...] no fresh water. Then, at a Congressional hearing, the Chairman of the House Oversight & Government Reform Committee said, "This is the United States of America - this isn't supposed to happen here. We are not some Third World country."nnWhat is a "third world problem?" This introductory environmental anthropology course examines how such imaginaries materialize in development programmes and literature, and bespeak charged geopolitical and racial histories; and invites reflection on what futures for working in common they enable/constrain. We will examine how crises are imagined and constructed, and the governance regimes they give rise to. How does water - as more »
As the Flint, Michigan water situation began to attract attention and condemnation, Michigan State Representative, Sheldon Neeley, describing the troops on the ground and the Red Cross distributing water bottles, said that the Governor had "turned an American city into a Third World country [...] it's terrible what he's done [...] no fresh water. Then, at a Congressional hearing, the Chairman of the House Oversight & Government Reform Committee said, "This is the United States of America - this isn't supposed to happen here. We are not some Third World country."nnWhat is a "third world problem?" This introductory environmental anthropology course examines how such imaginaries materialize in development programmes and literature, and bespeak charged geopolitical and racial histories; and invites reflection on what futures for working in common they enable/constrain. We will examine how crises are imagined and constructed, and the governance regimes they give rise to. How does water - as natural resource, public good, human right, need, or commodity - determine the contours of such regimes? We will also study chronic, quieter environmental problems and the responses they (do not) generate. Working through a variety of writing genres - ethnographies, policy literature, and legal and corporate publicity material - will enable students to appreciate what anthropology can contribute to the conversation on environmental justice, and state and corporate bureaucracies and their mandates. The course draws on examples from a wide range of settings. The course is offered as an introduction to environmental anthropology and takes students through key themes - infrastructure, race, class, privatization, justice, violence - by focusing on water. It requires no background in anthropology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER
Instructors: Hayat, M. (PI)

ARCHLGY 134: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (ARCHLGY 234, ARTHIST 284B)

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable 3 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: Hodge, C. (PI)

ARTHIST 284B: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (ARCHLGY 134, ARCHLGY 234)

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: Hodge, C. (PI)

BIO 109A: Building Blocks for Chronic Disease (BIOC 109A, BIOC 209A, HUMBIO 158)

Researchers have come a long way in developing therapies for chronic disease but a gap remains between current solutions and the ability to address the disease in full. This course provides an overview to the underlying biology of many of these diseases and how they may connect to each other. A "think outside of the box" approach to drug discovery is needed to bridge such a gap in solutions, and this course teaches the building blocks for that approach. Could Legoland provide the answer? This is a guest lecture series with original contributions from prominent thought leaders in academia and industry. Interaction between students and guest lecturers is expected. Students with a major, minor or coterm in Biology: 109A/209A or 109B/209B may count toward degree program but not both.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
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