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221 - 230 of 268 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 431: Leonardo's World: Science, Technology, and Art (ARTHIST 231, HISTORY 231, HISTORY 331, ITALIAN 231, ITALIAN 331)

Leonardo da Vinci is emblematic of creativity and innovation. His art is iconic, his inventions legendary. His understanding of nature, the human body, and machines made him a scientist and engineer as well as an artist. This class explores the historical Leonardo, exploring his interests and accomplishments as a product of the society of Renaissance Italy. Why did this world produce a Leonardo? Students will contribute to a library exhibit for the 500th anniversary of Leonardo's death in May 2019.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5

ARTHIST 432: Rethinking American Art

A re-examination of American art of the 18th and 19th centuries, focusing on works in the collection of the de Young Museum, San Francisco. The class will meet weekly at the de Young, where we will be joined by Professor Margaretta Lovell and students from the University of California, Berkeley. Each student will pursue an in-depth study of a single work in the Museum's superb American collections, using documents of social and cultural history. We will pay particular attention to recent scholarship, questions of genre (landscape, portrait, still life and images of everyday life), and the "biography of objects" (the way works of art shift in context and interpretation over time).nGraduate seminar open to advanced undergraduates with the instructor¿s approval.
Last offered: Autumn 2013

ARTHIST 440A: The Art Market

This seminar is designed to examine aspects of the art market in the current moment and since the mid 19th century. Participants will have an opportunity to engage with problems and perspectives that, until recently, have generally been overlooked or marginalized in narratives of the history of art. Each week, students will write a response to the readings to be shared in advance of the class meeting, and each week, discussion will be initiated by a different student. In individual research projects culminating in a seminar paper, students will be encouraged to focus on how the art market may have impacted the production, reception, and/or circulation of a work or works by a particular artist. 
Last offered: Spring 2014

ARTHIST 441: Overlooked/Understudied

This seminar focuses on overlooked artists and understudied artworks in the U.S. from the late 19th century to the present. Rather than reclaiming marginality for its own sake, we will consider how the practice of looking at the overlooked art changes familiar narratives of canonical art.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Meyer, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 445: What's not American about American Art?

This seminar focuses on American art as a history of migration (of people but also of visual objects) across national and continental boundaries. We examine trans-Atlantic and trans-Pacific dialogues and consider how anxieties about foreigners, immigrants, and political dissidents shaped American art and culture at particular moments in the 20th century. In the second half of the course, we consider a series of museum exhibitions that repositioned American art as a history of social conflict and exclusion.
Last offered: Spring 2013

ARTHIST 450: Art in the Age of Precarity

Art and precarity in the age of neoliberalism. How artists and critics engage questions of immaterial labor, human capital, structural racism, environmental crisis, the anthropocene and other current issues in their work. The question of art as activism and social practice relative to such themes. Enrollment contingent upon permission of instructor; permission numbers will be provided by staff upon professor's approval.
Last offered: Spring 2018

ARTHIST 452: Ghosts

Is history a form of ghost story? Historians summon the past--making it live in the present. Even the most empirical history is a kind of necromancy: the historian conjures the past, making it appear before our eyes. Tables and figures and other statistical data, no less than other other objective information, flutter in front of the reader like other sorts of ectoplasm in the crystal ball. In this course we will consider ghost stories and ghost paintings for what they reveal about the historian's occult craft. We will devote special attention to Stanford's campus as a haunted place, and students will write their final papers on some ghostly aspect of the university.
Last offered: Spring 2016

ARTHIST 453: Reading Walter Benjamin

Few cultural critics are so often cited by scholars in the humanities as Walter Benjamin. The impact of his writings has been decisive to some of the most influential art historians of recent memory, although usually based on a small number of texts (the Kunstwerk essay, the writings on photography, the flâneur, and cinema). Literary historians have turned to somewhat different studies with great profit, notably his writings on Baudelaire, translation, and German tragic drama. The publication of Benjamin¿s entire oeuvre in English has made his work more accessible to a broad range of scholars with diverse interests; one direction emerging from this familiarity is a deeper awareness of his commitment to materialist history. With the palpable collapse of ¿social art history¿ amongst younger art historians, dispersed ambitions of where ¿visual studies¿ might lead, and the return to aesthetic meditations derived from protracted analyses of single works, it may be the time to re-read Benjamin with an eye towards understanding his ambitions for a ¿materialist history.¿ That is the objective of this seminar : we will read deeply in Benjamin¿s writings, configure some ideas of what history meant to him, and attempt to export some of those practices to our current art-historical projects.
Last offered: Spring 2014

ARTHIST 454: The Image in Question : French theory after Foucault

TBD
Last offered: Spring 2015

ARTHIST 457: Abstract Expressionism

Coinciding with the opening of the Anderson Collection in the fall of 2014, this seminar considers the expanded field of Abstract Expressionism relative to both domestic and international cultural politics. Topics: Modernism and existentialism; transnational avant-gardes; interdisciplinary approaches to the visual image at mid-century; the ideologies of formalism and autonomous art; cold war aesthetics. Pollock. de Kooning, Guston, Newman, Rothko, Still, Gorky others. Close readings of Greenberg, Rosenberg and critics associated with Partisan Review and little magazines. Enrollment limited by application only; Phd students only with preference to Art History.
Last offered: Autumn 2014
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