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81 - 90 of 278 results for: all courses

CHEM 33: Structure and Reactivity of Organic Molecules

An introduction to organic chemistry, the molecular foundation to understanding the life sciences, medicine, diagnostics, energy, environmental and material science. Students will learn structural and bonding models of organic molecules that provide insights into chemical, physical, and reactivity properties, in addition to their biological activities, which collectively contribute to the molecularization and advancement of science disciplines from anthropology to zoology. Combining these models with kinetic and thermodynamic analyses allows molecular transformations to be rationalized and even predicted. Translation of this knowledge to more complex systems enables the synthesis of novel molecules or materials that can positively impact our science, society and environment. A two-hour weekly lab section accompanies the course to introduce the techniques of separation and identification of organic compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 31B or CHEM 31M.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

CHEM 131: Instrumental Analysis Principles and Practice

Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

CHEMENG 20: Introduction to Chemical Engineering (ENGR 20)

Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

CHEMENG 31N: When Chemistry Meets Engineering

Preference to freshmen. Chemistry and engineering are subjects that are ubiquitous around us. But what happens when the two meet? Students will explore this question by diving into experimental problems that scientists and engineers have to face on a daily basis. Many processes that are taken for granted have been developed by understanding science at a very fundamental level and then applying it to large and important industrial processes. In this seminar, students will explore some of the basic concepts that are important to address chemical engineering problems through experimental work. Students will build materials for energy and environmental applications, understand how to separate mixtures into pure compounds, produce fuels, and will learn to look at the chemical properties of molecules that are part of daily life with a different eye.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

CHPR 130: Human Nutrition (HUMBIO 130)

(HUMBIO students must enroll in HUMBIO 130. CHPR master's students must enroll in CHRP 130.) The study of food, and the nutrients and substances therein. Their action, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease. Emphasis is on the biological, chemical, and physiological processes by which humans ingest, digest, absorb, transport, utilize, and excrete food. Dietary composition and individual choices are discussed in relationship to the food supply, and to population and cultural, race, ethnic, religious, and social economic diversity. The relationships between nutrition and disease; ethnic diets; vegetarianism; nutritional deficiencies; nutritional supplementation; phytochemicals. CHPR master's students must enroll for a letter grade. Enrollment limited to students with sophomore academic standing or above. Prerequisites: Human Biology Core or Biology Foundations or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

COMPMED 80N: Animal behavior: sex, death, and sometimes food!

Preference to freshman. Behavior is what makes animals special (thirsty plants don't walk to water), but why do animals behave the way they do? What does their behavior tell us about their inner lives, and about ourselves? What do lipstick and cuckoos and fireflies have in common? Why would nobody want to be a penguin? What do mice say to each other in their pee-mail? Learning how to think about questions like these gives us a unique perspective on the natural world. Format: Flipped, Student-centered, Community of learners, with online and in-person discussion. Discussion and criticism of video examples, and documentaries, and student presentations. Topics: History and approaches to animal behavior; development of behavior, from genetics to learning; mechanisms of behavior, from neurons to motivation; function of behavior, from honest signals to selfish genes; the phylogeny of behavior, from domestication to speciation; and modern applications of behavior, from abnormal behavior, to conservation, to animal welfare, and animal consciousness.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Garner, J. (PI)

COMPMED 81Q: Aardvarks to Zebras: The A to Z of Animal Anatomy

Preference to sophomores. Ever wonder what cats and narwhals have in common? Maybe you haven¿t, but despite their seemingly different lifestyles and habitats (i.e. sleeping on couches versus swimming in oceans), they are both mammals! In this seminar, students will gain an appreciation for basic mammalian anatomic and physiologic principles that span across multiple species while emphasizing key differences that render each species unique. Through student projects, we will explore evolutionary adaptations that have driven the success of a variety of species within the context of their natural environments. In addition to a weekly lecture, anticipated laboratory sessions will reinforce anatomic principles through a combination of rodent cadaver dissection, organ and bone specimens, and use of virtual reality demonstrations. Furthermore, as conditions allow, students will have the opportunity to visit Año Nuevo State Park to experience a guided viewing of northern elephant seals within their natural habitat. Students with a passion for science will gain a fundamental understanding of anatomy that is applicable to future careers in medicine, biomedical research, veterinary medicine, and ecology/conservation.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Casey, K. (PI)

COMPMED 84Q: Globally Emerging Zoonotic Diseases

Preference to sophomores. Infectious diseases impacting veterinary and human health around the world today. Mechanisms of disease, epidemiology, and underlying diagnostic, treatment and control principles associated with these pathogens.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Felt, S. (PI)

COMPMED 87Q: Laboratory Mouse in Biomedical Research

What is a nude mouse and why is it used in cancer research? How come my mouse pups have a different coat color than their parents? What is a knockout mouse? Answers to these and more are in this introduction to the laboratory mouse, one of the most widely used models in biomedical research. We will explore the natural history and origin of the laboratory mouse; the ethics and regulations on the use of mice in research; the characteristics and nomenclature of commonly used mouse strains; the anatomy, physiology, and husbandry of mice; common mouse diseases and their effects on research; mouse coat color genetics and its relevance to human diseases; immunodeficient mouse models and their uses in research; and the technology for genetically engineering mice (e.g., transgenic mice). Hands-on laboratories will include mouse handling and biomethodology, necropsy and tissue sampling and anesthesia and surgery. Each student is expected to read research papers that use the mouse as a research model and give a presentation on a topic of their choice. Students interested in biomedical research and human or veterinary medicine will benefit from this seminar.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Nagamine, C. (PI)

COMPMED 91N: And that's why cats should never eat garlic!

Did you know that although we love garlic, it could make cats very sick? And how come if a human or a dog gets a heart attack they¿ll end up with a scar, but some fish can regenerate parts of their hearts? In this course, we will explore how select diseases can manifest themselves similarly or differently in different animal species. Students will have the opportunity to interpret physical exam findings, examine blood lab tests (bloodwork), look at X-rays (radiographs), and see what some of these diseases look like at the microscopic level (histology). Students will also discuss how humans benefit from understanding diseases in veterinary species, and how veterinary species benefit from understanding diseases in humans. This course will be of interest to those wanting to learn more about disease processes, and those interested in pursuing careers in biomedical fields including veterinary and human medicine. Oh, and one last thing ¿ don¿t cook with non-stick pans if you have indoor birds. Why? Sign up for the course to find out!
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
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