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161 - 170 of 188 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 356: American and European Art, 1945-1968 (ARTHIST 156)

Examines the pivotal figures, movements, themes and practices of art in the United States and Europe, from the conclusion of World War 2 to the end of the 1960s. Emphasis is on the changed nature of the avant-garde after the catastrophic events of midcentury. Topics include: modern art, ideology and the Cold War; the rise of consumer society and the "Society of the Spectacle"; concepts of medium specificity; the impact of new media and technologies on postwar art making; the role of the artist as worker and activist. Movements include: Abstract Expressionism, Art Informel, Pop, minimalism, process, performance conceptual art. An introductory art history course is recommended.

ARTHIST 357A: Histories of Photography (ARTHIST 157A)

This course investigates multiple histories of photography. It begins in early nineteenth-century Europe with the origins of the medium and ends in the United States on September 11, 2001, a day that demonstrated the limits of photographic seeing. Rather than stabilizing any single trajectory of technological iterations, the course is more interested in considering the ¿work¿ performed by photography. Through historical case studies, it considers how `to photograph¿ is to order and to construct the world; to incite action and to persuade; to describe and to document; to record and to censor; to wound; to heal.

ARTHIST 362: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Contemporary Art (ARTHIST 162)

This course focuses on issues of race, gender, and sexuality in American art and criticism from 1972 to the present. How have the terms of racial identity and sexual difference shaped the production and reception of contemporary art across the last four decades? What status has the body--and more specifically, the body of the artist--been accorded within recent work on identity and difference? Throughout the course of the semester, we will be particularly attentive to issues of racial and sexual stereotype. What critical or subversive uses have contemporary artists found for pictorial stereotype? How have stereotypes of race, gender, and sexuality been recycled in order to be mocked or deconstructed?

ARTHIST 373: Issues in Contemporary Art (ARTHIST 173)

Major figures, themes, and movements of contemporary art from the 80s to the present. Readings on the neo-avant garde; postmodernism; art and identity politics; new media and technology; globalization and participatory aesthetics. Prerequisite: ARTHIST 155, or equivalent with consent of instructor.

ARTHIST 387: Arts of War and Peace: Late Medieval and Early Modern Japan, 1500-1868 (ARTHIST 187, JAPANGEN 185)

Narratives of conflict, pacification, orthodoxy, nostalgia, and novelty through visual culture during the change of episteme from late medieval to early modern, 16th through early 19th centuries. The rhetorical messages of castles, teahouses, gardens, ceramics, paintings, and prints; the influence of Dutch and Chinese visuality; transformation in the roles of art and artist; tensions between the old and the new leading to the modernization of Japan.

ARTHIST 388A: The History of Modern and Contemporary Japanese and Chinese Architecture and Urbanism (ARTHIST 188A)

The recent rapid urbanization and architectural transformation of Asia; focus is on the architecture of Japan and China since the mid-19th century. History of forms, theories, and styles that serve as the foundation for today's buildings and cityscapes. How Eastern and Western ideas of modernism have merged or diverged and how these forces continue to shape the future of Japanese and Chinese architecture and urban form.

ARTHIST 400M: The Artist in Ancient Greek Society (ARTHIST 200M)

An exploration of the low status of artists in a culture that valued their work but not the men themselves. Potters were especially scorned but even sculptors of gold and ivory statues were seen as "mechanics" (Herodotus), with soft bodies and soft minds (Xenophon), "indifferent to higher things" (Plutarch). Topics include case studies of individual artists, their importance to the polis, their workshops, wages and occupational hazards and the impact of social isolation on the quality of their work.

ARTHIST 405: Art, Ekphrasis, and Music in Byzantium and Islam (CLASSICS 376)

Focus is on the interrelation of art, architecture, verbal description, poetry, and music, including the singing of psalms and recitation of the Qur'an. How ekphrasis, the style of writing vividly intended to transform the listeners into spectators, structures the perception of and response to artistic production be it an art object, building, or a musical performance. The role of ekphrasis in animating the inanimate and the importance of breath and spirit, which become manifest in visual, acoustic, olfactory, and gustatory terms. Religious and courtly settings: Hagia Sophia, the Great Palace of Constantinople, the Dome of the Rock, the palaces of Baghdad and Samarra, the mosque at Cordoba, Medinat al-Zahra and the Alhambra. Greek and Arabic writers on ekphrasis in translation, juxtaposing the medieval material to the ancient theories of ekphrasis and modern scholarship.

ARTHIST 411: Animation, Performance, Presence in Medieval Art (CLASSICS 377)

(Formerly CLASSART 311.) This course will explore concepts of animacy, performance, and presence in the art of Byzantium, focusing on the concept of image understood as the living bodies of the saints, the space of Hagia Sophia and its Eucharist ritual, the polymorphism of the mixed-media icon, and the interaction with these objects in prayer and recitation of epigrams.
| Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

ARTHIST 413: Michelangelo

Michelangelo's long career in light of recent scholarship. Topics include the status of the cult image, the paragon between poetry and the pictorial arts, painting and questions of literary genre, and Counter Reformation reactions to his art.
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