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1 - 10 of 16 results for: INTNLREL

INTNLREL 33SI: Myths and Realities of U.S.-China Relations

This course introduces students to the U.S.-China relationship through a weekly speaker series followed by student-led discussions. Speakers from academia and industry will explore topics such as the business environment of China, the politics of the Sino-American dynamic, and technological growth in China. The purpose of the course is to tackle the myths and misconceptions surrounding U.S.-China relations, and build in students a strong foundational understanding of the multiple facets of the bilateral relationship. Students will be exposed to a variety of issues and those who take the course for 2 units will be able to explore a topic of interest through a capstone presentation at the end of the course.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 8 units total)
Instructors: Rozelle, S. (PI)

INTNLREL 110C: America and the World Economy (AMSTUD 110C, POLISCI 110C, POLISCI 110X)

Examination of contemporary US foreign economic policy. Areas studied: the changing role of the dollar; mechanism of international monetary management; recent crises in world markets including those in Europe and Asia; role of IMF, World Bank and WTO in stabilizing world economy; trade politics and policies; the effects of the globalization of business on future US prosperity. Political Science majors taking this course for WIM credit should enroll in POLISCI 110C.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

INTNLREL 122: Introduction to European Studies (POLISCI 213E)

This course offers an introduction to major topics in the study of historical and contemporary Europe. We focus on European politics, economics and culture. First, we study what makes Europe special, and how its distinct identity has been influenced by its history. Next, we analyze Europe's politics. We study parliamentary government and proportional representation electoral systems, and how they affect policy. Subsequently, we examine the challenges the European economy faces. We further study the European Union and transatlantic relations.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Crombez, C. (PI)

INTNLREL 131: Understanding Russia: Its Power and Purpose in a New Global Order (INTLPOL 231B, POLISCI 113, REES 231B)

Russia presents a puzzle for theories of socio-economic development and modernization and their relationship to state power in international politics. The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 brought into being the new Russia (or Russian Federation) as its successor in international politics. Russia suffered one of the worst recessions and experienced 25 years of halting reform. Despite these issues, Russia is again a central player in international affairs. Course analyzes motivations behind contemporary Russian foreign policy by reviewing its domestic and economic underpinnings. Examination of concept of state power in international politics to assess Russia's capabilities to influence other states' policies, and under what conditions its leaders use these resources. Is contemporary Russia strong or weak? What are the resources and constraints its projection of power beyond its borders? What are the determinants of state power in international politics in the twenty-first century? This course is a combination of a lecture and discussion, and will include lectures, readings, class discussions, films and documentaries.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Stoner, K. (PI)

INTNLREL 136R: Introduction to Global Justice (ETHICSOC 136R, PHIL 76, POLISCI 136R, POLISCI 336)

Our world is divided into many different states, each of which has its own culture or set of cultures. Vast inequalities of wealth and power exist between citizens of the rich world and the global poor. International commerce, immigration, and climate change entwine our lives in ways that transcend borders. It is in this context that problems of global justice, which relate to the normative obligations that arise from our international order, emerge. What demands (if any) does justice impose on institutions and individuals acting in a global context? Is it morally permissible to prioritize the welfare of our compatriots over the welfare of foreigners? Do states have the right to control their borders? What are the responsibilities (if any) of wealthy states, consumers, and multinational corporations to the global poor? This course explores longstanding problems of global justice via a discussion of contemporary issues, including: global poverty, immigration, human rights, economic sanc more »
Our world is divided into many different states, each of which has its own culture or set of cultures. Vast inequalities of wealth and power exist between citizens of the rich world and the global poor. International commerce, immigration, and climate change entwine our lives in ways that transcend borders. It is in this context that problems of global justice, which relate to the normative obligations that arise from our international order, emerge. What demands (if any) does justice impose on institutions and individuals acting in a global context? Is it morally permissible to prioritize the welfare of our compatriots over the welfare of foreigners? Do states have the right to control their borders? What are the responsibilities (if any) of wealthy states, consumers, and multinational corporations to the global poor? This course explores longstanding problems of global justice via a discussion of contemporary issues, including: global poverty, immigration, human rights, economic sanctions, resource and land claims, reparations for colonialism, and climate change. There are no easy answers to these questions, and the complexity of these issues requires an interdisciplinary approach. While there are several possible theoretical approaches to problems of global justice, the approach taken in this course will be rooted in the Western tradition of liberal political philosophy and political theory. By the end of this course, students will be familiar with contemporary problems of global justice, be able to critically assess theoretical approaches to these problems, and be able to formulate and defend their own views on these complex issues.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER

INTNLREL 140A: International Law and International Relations

International law, as a body of law, performs multiple, competing functions. It serves the interests, and seeks to limit the actions, of state actors. It is also a political rhetoric captured by the oppressed, and a foundation for activism and resistance. The purpose of this seminar is to illuminate this malleable nature of international law, to explain its foundational principles and sources, and to evaluate the contours of its role as law and discourse. Questions that will accompany us throughout this seminar include: What is the character of international legal rules? Do they matter in international politics? How effective are they? What potential and what limitations do they have? In addition to exploring such questions against the backdrop of theories of international relations, we will consider several topics which bring tensions between international law and international relations to the fore, such as use of force, human rights, and international criminal law.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Heller, B. (PI)

INTNLREL 143: State and Society in Korea (SOC 111, SOC 211)

20th-century Korea from a comparative historical perspective. Colonialism, nationalism, development, state-society relations, democratization, and globalization with reference to the Korean experience.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI
Instructors: Shin, G. (PI)

INTNLREL 150: Political Development in the Arab World

The purpose of this course is to situate important theoretical debates on the determinants and dynamics of political development in the contemporary empirical realities in the Arab world. Specifically, students are challenged to employ their understanding of the modern political landscape in Arab countries to evaluate seminal scholarly works theorizing the origins of political development. That is, how can the dynamics of political change and continuity in the Arab world inform and refine our broader understanding of fundamental questions we care about as political scientists: Why does authoritarianism persist? How can autocracy coexist with economic development and liberalization? How do the international political economy and external actors shape the boundaries for political change in a given country? How do we make sense of the paradoxical combination of elections and authoritarian rule?
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Sallam, H. (PI)

INTNLREL 154: The Cold War: An International History (HISTORY 166C)

Though it ended twenty years ago, we still live in a world shaped by the Cold War. Beginning with its origins in the mid-1940s, this course will trace the evolution of the global struggle, until its culmination at the end of the 1980s. Students will be asked to ponder the fundamental nature of the Cold War, what kept it alive for nearly fifty years, how it ended, and its long term legacy for the world. As distinguished from the lecture taught in previous quarters, this class will closely investigate ten major Cold War battlegrounds over the quarter. Selected case studies will include: the division of Germany, Iran in the 1950s, Cuba, Vietnam, the Six Day War, the Chilean coup, sub-Saharan Africa, Afghanistan, Central America, and the Eastern European revolutions of 1989. Students will be asked to consult a combination of original documents and recent histories.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Rakove, R. (PI)

INTNLREL 158: Chinese Politics (POLISCI 148, POLISCI 348)

China, one of the few remaining communist states in the world, has not only survived, but has become a global political actor of consequence with the fastest growing economy in the world. Why has the CCP thrived while other communist regimes have failed? What explains China's authoritarian resilience? What are the limits to such resilience? How has the Chinese Communist Party managed to develop markets and yet keep itself in power? How does censorship work in the information and 'connected' age of social media? How resilient is the party state in the face of technological and economic change? Materials will include readings, lectures, and selected films. This course has no prerequisites. This course fulfills the Writing in the Major requirement for Political Science and International Relations undergraduate majors. PoliSci majors should register for POLISCI 148 and IR majors should register for INTNLREL 158. Graduate students should register for POLISCI 348.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI
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