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1 - 10 of 25 results for: GSBGEN

GSBGEN 299: The Core Curriculum in the Workplace

GSB students are eligible to report on work experience that is relevant to their core studies under the direction of the Senior Associate Dean responsible for the MBA Program. Registration for this work must be approved by the Assistant Dean of the MBA Program and is limited to students who present a project which, in judgment of the Advisor, may be undertaken to enhance the material learned in the first year core required courses. It is expected that this research be carried on by the student with a large degree of independence and the expected result is a written report, typically due at the end of the quarter in which the course is taken. Specific assignment details and deadline information will be communicated to enrolled students. Units earned for this course do not meet the requirements needed for graduation.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable 8 times (up to 8 units total)

GSBGEN 306: Real Estate Investment

The major objective of this course is to provide the student with an understanding of the fundamentals of real estate investment. The course covers land economics, market analysis, finance, taxation, investment analysis, investment vehicles, real estate risk, development and urban design. Major land uses are discussed including apartments, retail, office, and industrial. The course is designed for students with limited or no background in real estate.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

GSBGEN 315: Strategic Communication

Business leaders have marketing strategies, expansion strategies, finance strategies, even exit strategies. Successful leaders, however, also have communication strategies. This course will explore how individuals and organizations can develop and execute effective communication strategies for a variety of business settings. This course introduces the essentials of communication strategy and persuasion: audience analysis, communicator credibility, message construction and delivery. Deliverables will include written documents and oral presentations and you will present both individually and in a team. You will receive feedback to improve your communication effectiveness. This practical course helps students develop confidence in their speaking and writing through weekly presentations and assignments, lectures and discussions, guest speakers, simulated activities, and videotaped feedback. An important feature of this course is that there are two faculty members working in concert to ensu more »
Business leaders have marketing strategies, expansion strategies, finance strategies, even exit strategies. Successful leaders, however, also have communication strategies. This course will explore how individuals and organizations can develop and execute effective communication strategies for a variety of business settings. This course introduces the essentials of communication strategy and persuasion: audience analysis, communicator credibility, message construction and delivery. Deliverables will include written documents and oral presentations and you will present both individually and in a team. You will receive feedback to improve your communication effectiveness. This practical course helps students develop confidence in their speaking and writing through weekly presentations and assignments, lectures and discussions, guest speakers, simulated activities, and videotaped feedback. An important feature of this course is that there are two faculty members working in concert to ensure that students get rigorous and individualized coaching and feedback. In this course you will learn to: - Create communication strategies at an individual and organizational level - Develop clearly organized and effective presentations and documents - Diagnose and expand your personal writing and oral delivery style - Adapt your delivery style to different material and audiences - Enhance oral delivery through effective visual aids Students at all levels of comfort and expertise with public speaking and business writing will benefit from this course.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4

GSBGEN 332: Climate Tech for Rapid Decarbonization

This course examines alternative pathways for economies around the world to achieve deep decarbonization within a couple of decades. The overall perspective is to analyze the global decarbonization process at the intersection of technological improvements, financial fundamentals and the parameters set by public policies.The first part of the course will be concerned with the science and the political economy of climate change, greenhouse gas emissions and the proliferation of net-zero pledges by governments and corporations. Included in this part is a closer look at countries for which the production and export of fossil fuels is a key economic activity. We then turn to the competitiveness of carbon-free or low-carbon technologies in different segments of the economy, including i) power generation, ii) energy storage, iii) transportation, iv) industrial production and v) food and Ag Tech. The final part of the course turns to the emergence of energy technologies with future commercial potential, including hydrogen, fission/fusion, carbon capture and utilization and synthetic hydrocarbons.The course will rely on lectures from each of the three instructors, guest presentations and select case studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

GSBGEN 341: Climate Change, Economics, Technology

This course covers (1) the causes and consequences of climate change, (2) the predicted economic impacts, policy modeling, and ethical concerns, and (3) the technological pathways that the world is likely to follow. The first part focuses on both basics and common misunderstandings. This includes the role of income growth, population growth, regional growth, efficiency growth, and poverty. The second part begins with integrated assessment models and reasons for disagreement among prominent models. (Students are expected to understand public goods dilemmas and free-riding.) It then proceeds to an obvious but often overlooked basic and essential fact: these models upon which all activist and government actions are based are unrealistic academic exercises. They are not even asking the right questions. Thus, United Nations treaties and carbon footprint initiatives are distractions rather than solutions. The third part discusses where clean and other technology is as of 2022 and what it wil more »
This course covers (1) the causes and consequences of climate change, (2) the predicted economic impacts, policy modeling, and ethical concerns, and (3) the technological pathways that the world is likely to follow. The first part focuses on both basics and common misunderstandings. This includes the role of income growth, population growth, regional growth, efficiency growth, and poverty. The second part begins with integrated assessment models and reasons for disagreement among prominent models. (Students are expected to understand public goods dilemmas and free-riding.) It then proceeds to an obvious but often overlooked basic and essential fact: these models upon which all activist and government actions are based are unrealistic academic exercises. They are not even asking the right questions. Thus, United Nations treaties and carbon footprint initiatives are distractions rather than solutions. The third part discusses where clean and other technology is as of 2022 and what it will still take to reduce global warming. It also discusses why some prominently proposed technologies are hopeless, too; while other cheaper actions have remained unused (lost opportunities). Dissent and discussion, seminar-style, is encouraged. The grade will be based primarily on a midterm and take-home final, with some flexibility for students interested in doing more.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Welch, I. (PI)

GSBGEN 345: Disruptions in Education

The recent pandemic disrupted higher education significantly, surfacing novel needs, while at the same putting decades long trends into sharper focus. This course explores the contemporary higher education industry, focusing especially on the places where disruptions of all kinds present significant opportunities and challenges for entrepreneurs, investors, and the businesses that serve this huge global market, as well as for faculty, students, and higher education institutions and leaders, both incumbents and alternatives. Using a variety of readings and case studies to better understand recent disruptions and the unbundling occurring across the postsecondary landscape, from outside and inside the academy, both for-profit and non-profit, the course will examine technology in teaching and learning; the future of the degree and alternatives to the traditional credential; accreditation; competency based education; affordability, student debt, and education financing models; investing in the education space; workforce, skills development, and lifelong learning; and tertiary products and platforms that serve the student services market. Guests will include higher education leaders and practitioners, as well as investors, entrepreneurs, and social entrepreneurs.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

GSBGEN 346: Freedom, Democracy, and Capitalism

This is a civics course about the ideas that comprise a modern implementation of liberal democracy: freedom, democracy, capitalism, and a rules-based international order. Our principal focus will be on the post-WWII American implementation of these ideas.We will explore these ideas from the midpoint of theory and real-world implementation.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

GSBGEN 360: Sports Business Management

This course will examine the diverse management challenges facing the sports industry. The course will cover issues at the league level, the team level, the athlete/agent level, and the college level. The diverse constituencies with interests in sports issues (athletes, fans, media companies, advertisers, and legislators to name a few) will be discussed. Sports issues at a global level (the IOC) and both U.S. and outside U.S. will be covered. There will be coverage of evolving business ventures related to the sports industry (such as venture backed sports companies and sports networks). A key focus is on how the sports industry is similar to and different from other industries. Key concepts underlying the course are: value creation/value sharing; revenue ecosystem; virtuous circles and vicious circles; disruptive technologies; growth facilitators and growth inhibitors; leveragable assets/inherited liabilities; and entrepreneurship/new product innovations. Over 80% of the sessions typically will include a guest co-lecturer from the sporting industry.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

GSBGEN 390: Individual Research

Need approval from sponsoring faculty member and GSB Registrar.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: Aaker, J. (PI) ; Abrahams, M. (PI) ; Abramson, R. (PI) ; Admati, A. (PI) ; Akbarpour, M. (PI) ; Allende Santa Cruz, C. (PI) ; Alper, B. (PI) ; Andrews, C. (PI) ; Armstrong, C. (PI) ; Athey, S. (PI) ; Atwell, J. (PI) ; Barnett, W. (PI) ; Batista, E. (PI) ; Bayati, M. (PI) ; Begenau, J. (PI) ; Bendor, J. (PI) ; Benkard, L. (PI) ; Berg, J. (PI) ; Berk, J. (PI) ; Bettinger, E. (PI) ; Beyer, A. (PI) ; Bimpikis, K. (PI) ; Blankespoor, E. (PI) ; Blattner, L. (PI) ; Brady, S. (PI) ; Brest, P. (PI) ; Buchak, G. (PI) ; Bulow, J. (PI) ; Burgelman, R. (PI) ; Callander, S. (PI) ; Carmel-Hurwitz, D. (PI) ; Carroll, G. (PI) ; Casey, K. (PI) ; Chess, R. (PI) ; Chin, L. (PI) ; Choi, J. (PI) ; Ciesinski, S. (PI) ; Clement, J. (PI) ; Corney, A. (PI) ; Coulson, S. (PI) ; Davis, S. (PI) ; DeMarzo, P. (PI) ; Demarest, D. (PI) ; Di Tella, S. (PI) ; Diamond, R. (PI) ; Ding, Y. (PI) ; Dobbs, C. (PI) ; Dodson, D. (PI) ; Donkor, K. (PI) ; Duffie, D. (PI) ; Ellis, J. (PI) ; Ewald, C. (PI) ; Feinberg, Y. (PI) ; Flynn, F. (PI) ; Foarta, D. (PI) ; Foster, G. (PI) ; Francis, P. (PI) ; Francisco, R. (PI) ; Frankel, R. (PI) ; Galen, D. (PI) ; Gelfand, M. (PI) ; Gipper, B. (PI) ; Glickman, M. (PI) ; Goldberg, A. (PI) ; Goldberg, S. (PI) ; Grenadier, S. (PI) ; Grousbeck, H. (PI) ; Gruenfeld, D. (PI) ; Gur, Y. (PI) ; Guttentag, B. (PI) ; Halevy, N. (PI) ; Hartmann, W. (PI) ; Hebert, B. (PI) ; Hennessey, K. (PI) ; Huang, S. (PI) ; Hudson, C. (PI) ; Hurley, J. (PI) ; Iancu, D. (PI) ; Imbens, G. (PI) ; Jacobs, B. (PI) ; Jha, S. (PI) ; Johnson, S. (PI) ; Jones, C. (PI) ; Jones, P. (PI) ; Joss, R. (PI) ; Karaduman, O. (PI) ; Kasznik, R. (PI) ; Katzir, D. (PI) ; Keelan, H. (PI) ; Kelly, A. (PI) ; Kelly, P. (PI) ; Kepler, J. (PI) ; Kessler, D. (PI) ; Kim, J. (PI) ; Kim, Y. (PI) ; Kluger, A. (PI) ; Kosinski, M. (PI) ; Koudijs, P. (PI) ; Kramon, G. (PI) ; Krehbiel, K. (PI) ; Krishnamurthy, A. (PI) ; Krubert, C. (PI) ; Kupor, S. (PI) ; LaBlanc, G. (PI) ; Lam, L. (PI) ; Lattin, J. (PI) ; Lee, G. (PI) ; Lee, H. (PI) ; Lei, L. (PI) ; Lester, R. (PI) ; Levav, J. (PI) ; Levin, J. (PI) ; Linbeck, L. (PI) ; Lisbonne, B. (PI) ; Lowery, B. (PI) ; Lustig, H. (PI) ; Maggiori, M. (PI) ; Mahowald, C. (PI) ; Mak, K. (PI) ; Malhotra, N. (PI) ; Mandelbaum, F. (PI) ; Marinovic, I. (PI) ; Martin, A. (PI) ; Martin, G. (PI) ; McGonigal, K. (PI) ; McLennan, S. (PI) ; McNichols, M. (PI) ; Meehan, B. (PI) ; Mendelson, H. (PI) ; Miller, D. (PI) ; Monin, B. (PI) ; Most, H. (PI) ; Munce, C. (PI) ; Nair, H. (PI) ; Nakache, P. (PI) ; Narayanan, S. (PI) ; Noh, S. (PI) ; O'Reilly, C. (PI) ; Osborne, G. (PI) ; Ostrovsky, M. (PI) ; Oyer, P. (PI) ; Parker, G. (PI) ; Patel, H. (PI) ; Peterson, J. (PI) ; Pfeffer, J. (PI) ; Pfleiderer, P. (PI) ; Piotroski, J. (PI) ; Plambeck, E. (PI) ; Rao, H. (PI) ; Rapp, A. (PI) ; Rauh, J. (PI) ; Reichelstein, S. (PI) ; Reiss, P. (PI) ; Rice, C. (PI) ; Risk, G. (PI) ; Robles Garcia, C. (PI) ; Rogers, M. (PI) ; Ross, M. (PI) ; Saban, D. (PI) ; Sahni, N. (PI) ; Saloner, G. (PI) ; Sannikov, Y. (PI) ; Schifrin, D. (PI) ; Schulman, K. (PI) ; Seru, A. (PI) ; Shakir, D. (PI) ; Sharabi Levine, Y. (PI) ; Shaw, K. (PI) ; Shiv, B. (PI) ; Shotts, K. (PI) ; Siegel, R. (PI) ; Siegelman, R. (PI) ; Singh, H. (PI) ; Skrzypacz, A. (PI) ; Smith, K. (PI) ; Somaini, P. (PI) ; Sorensen, J. (PI) ; Soule, S. (PI) ; Spiess, J. (PI) ; Starkey, K. (PI) ; Sterling, A. (PI) ; Strebulaev, I. (PI) ; Sugaya, T. (PI) ; Tonetti, C. (PI) ; Tormala, Z. (PI) ; Tully, S. (PI) ; Vasserman, S. (PI) ; Voorsanger, M. (PI) ; Wager, S. (PI) ; Wallace, C. (PI) ; Weaver, G. (PI) ; Wein, L. (PI) ; Weintraub, G. (PI) ; Wheeler, S. (PI) ; Williams Cosey, F. (PI) ; Wilson, R. (PI) ; Xu, C. (PI) ; Xu, K. (PI) ; Yurukoglu, A. (PI) ; Zenios, S. (PI) ; Zhong, W. (PI) ; Ziebelman, P. (PI) ; Zwiebel, J. (PI)

GSBGEN 494: Leadership for Society: Creating Daring Dialogs

Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Keelan, H. (PI)
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