2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021 2021-2022 2022-2023
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 18 results for: DLCL

DLCL 21N: Ecologies of Communication (ENGLISH 21N, SUSTAIN 51N)

What remnants of our culture will future generations discover and decipher and how will they interpret these? How will they access the technologies we have created? How will they understand the environmental changes that current humans have caused? And how will their encounters with the past inform their own future? This IntroSem explores a humanistic perspective on sustainability, viewing the human record itself as a resource and exploring how it might be sustained in an ethical and meaningful way. Broadly, we ask what is the science behind sustaining the ecology of historic heritage?
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

DLCL 50B: At Home Abroad Seminar: The Global Creativity Lab (GLOBAL 50B)

The At Home Abroad House invites you to challenge the way you usually learn by trying out art forms and creative problem-solving strategies from around the world and building your own understanding of what it means to live in a global age. This once-a-week seminar offers a line-up of hands-on sessions with seasoned guests from across Stanford. Each session introduces students to a different cultural perspective via expert insight and activities that encourage learning by doing: faculty- and student-led workshops will encompass multiple media (such as music, dance, visual arts), genres (such as pop culture, drama, folklore, and poetry), and venues that are global in nature (such as sports and technology). Through lively discussion and active doing, students will gain exposure to global discourses and issues through creative approaches. No prerequisites; required for pre-assigned residents of AHA; open to all interested undergraduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 9 times (up to 18 units total)

DLCL 111Q: Texts and Contexts: Spanish/English Literary Translation Workshop (COMPLIT 111Q, ILAC 111Q)

The Argentinian writer and translator, Jorge Luis Borges, once said, 'Cada idioma es un modo de sentir el universo.' How are modes of feeling and perception translated across languages? How does the historical context of a work condition its translation into and out of a language? In this course, you will translate from a variety of genres that will teach you the practical skills necessary to translate literary texts from Spanish to English and English to Spanish. By the end of the term, you will have translated and received feedback on a project of your own choosing. Discussion topics may include: the importance of register, tone, and audience; the gains, in addition to the losses, that translations may introduce; the role of ideological, social-political, and aesthetic factors on the production of translations; and comparative syntaxes, morphologies, and semantic systems. Preference will be given to sophomores but freshman through seniors have enjoyed this course in the past. Course taught in Spanish.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Santana, C. (PI)

DLCL 142: Literature as Performance: (COMPLIT 122)

The course re-embeds great dramatic texts in history, theory, and philosophy of performance. We counterpoint Plato's Symposium on Eros with the performative tradition of the Persian love lyric, and continue to develop fruitful comparisons across a range of international works and thinkers. Course incorporates two live TAPS and Shakes productions, audiovisual works and films, and students' own creative ventures.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

DLCL 189B: Honors Thesis Seminar

For undergraduate majors in DLCL departments; required for honors students. Planning, researching, and writing an honors thesis. Oral presentations and peer workshops. Research and writing methodologies, and larger critical issues in literary studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4

DLCL 204: Digital Humanities Across Borders (COMPLIT 204A)

What if you could take a handwritten manuscript, or a pile of 100 books, and map all the locations that are referenced, or see which characters interact with one another, or how different translators adapted the same novel -- without reading through each text to manually compile those lists? Digital humanities tools and methods make it possible, but most tools and tutorials assume the texts are in English. If you work with text (literature, historical documents, fanfic, tweets, or any other textual material) in languages other than English, DLCL 204 is for you. No previous programming or other technical experience is required, just a reading knowledge of a language other than English (modern or historical). We'll cover the whole process of using digital tools, from start to finish: text acquisition, text enrichment, and analysis/visualization, all of which have applications in a wide range of job contexts within and beyond academia.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

DLCL 221: Materia

Materia is a focal group on post-anthropocentrism, Latin Americanist and otherwise. Building on and expanding the theoretical framework offered by thinkers such as Fernando Ortiz, Bruno Latour, and Jane Bennett, we engage with works of literature and criticism that de-center the human as object of study. To earn the unit, undergraduate and graduate students should attend the workshops held by the focal group, prepare the pre-circulated readings, and actively contribute to discussion throughout the year. The latter can take place during plenary, over office hours with faculty coordinators, or via contributions to the focal group's online platforms. A short quarterly response paper that relates group discussions with the student's ongoing research is recommended. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 15 units total)
Instructors: Hoyos, H. (PI)

DLCL 222: Philosophy and Literature

The Focal Group in Philosophy and Literature brings together scholars and students from eight departments to investigate questions in aesthetics and literary theory, philosophically-inflected literary texts, and the form of philosophical writings. Fields of interest include both continental and analytic philosophy, as well as cognitive science, political philosophy, rational choice theory, and related fields. Students may sign up for a unit of credit each quarter via DLCL 222. To earn the unit, students must secure written permission in advance from one of the instructors, before the final study list deadline. They must then do one of the following three things: (a) attend an event hosted by the Philosophy and Literature group (including events hosted by the graduate workshop) and write up a reaction paper of 2-5 pages; (b) present a paper of their own to the graduate workshop; (c) agree with one of the DLCL 222 instructors on a reading related to the year's activities, and meet with more »
The Focal Group in Philosophy and Literature brings together scholars and students from eight departments to investigate questions in aesthetics and literary theory, philosophically-inflected literary texts, and the form of philosophical writings. Fields of interest include both continental and analytic philosophy, as well as cognitive science, political philosophy, rational choice theory, and related fields. Students may sign up for a unit of credit each quarter via DLCL 222. To earn the unit, students must secure written permission in advance from one of the instructors, before the final study list deadline. They must then do one of the following three things: (a) attend an event hosted by the Philosophy and Literature group (including events hosted by the graduate workshop) and write up a reaction paper of 2-5 pages; (b) present a paper of their own to the graduate workshop; (c) agree with one of the DLCL 222 instructors on a reading related to the year's activities, and meet with him/her for a discussion of that reading. Normally, students should register for the CR/NC option; only students planning to use DLCL 222 for the Ph.D. minor in Philosophy and Literature should enroll for a letter grade. Prerequisite for undergraduates: undergraduate students wishing to take DLCL 222 must previously have taken the philosophy and literature gateway course PHIL 81 ( CLASSICS 42, COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, GERMAN 181, ITALIAN 181, SLAVIC 181) or a class taught by one of the instructors of DLCL 222.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

DLCL 223: Renaissances

The Renaissances Group brings together faculty members and students from several departments at Stanford to consider the present and future of early modern literary studies (a period spanning the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries). Taking seriously the plural form of the group's name, we seek to explore the early modern period from a wide range of disciplinary, cultural, linguistic, and geographical perspectives.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Greene, R. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints