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241 - 250 of 273 results for: PWR

PWR 91JS: Stanford Science Podcast (EARTHSYS 157)

In this course, students will explore how podcasts can be used as a tool for effective science communication. Through a series of workshops and guest speakers, students in this course will learn the necessary journalistic and technical skills to produce high quality podcast episodes, from interviewing and storytelling to audio editing and digital publishing. Podcast episodes will highlight the cutting edge research being done at Stanford, and students will choose specific stories based on their own interests, from earth sciences to public health to big data. Final podcast episodes will be published on iTunes.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Stonaker, J. (PI)

PWR 91KD: Intermediate Writing: Scripting Entertainments (for a Better YouTube)

In its short time on the planet, youtube videos have created their very own viral (and lucrative) culture. But what if the power of internet distribution could be paired with the power of good substantial storytelling? What if the content could be more socially stirring and powerful than "this is me doing crazy adventures" or "this is me pranking someone"¿or "this is me eating $14 avocado toast in PA"? In this seminar, we first break down the various codes and generic features of currently popular vlogs, then apprentice to current scripting techniques being used by playwrights (Anna Deavere Smith, Suzan-Lori Parks) and scriptwriters on shows from Hulu (East Los High), and Prime (Frankenstein Chronicles), then finally turn our hand to the scripting, rehearsing, shooting, and production of our very own 1-3 minute videos. Our goal is to develop the critical, creative, and digital tools to make effective and engaging scripted short videos for the telling of our current stories, for the destabilization of dominant cultural stories, and for the re-stabilization of the two in potent remix.
Last offered: Spring 2019

PWR 91KS: Intermediate Writing: Design Thinking and Science Communication

Effective communication of expert knowledge in the sciences to non-specialist audiences. Project-based work on a range and variety of communication challenges, contexts, and media. For students who have completed the first two levels of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/explore/notation-science-writing.
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

PWR 91KSA: Intermediate Writing: Storytelling and Science

What is story? What is storytelling? And why would storytelling be crucial for science communication? In this class we will develop your Story IQ: we will learn how humans evolved to be the storytelling animal, how stories shape our lives, and why and how science communication needs storytelling in order to be relevant to public audiences. We'll move from looking at story architecture, to critiquing story structures (and stories) in science communications, and then to creating compelling stories of our own that communicate and/or correct science research or discovery. For course video and full description, visit https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/additional-elective-courses/science-and-storytelling.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

PWR 91KT: Intermediate Writing: Game Set Match: Shaping Publics to Shape Movements

The success of a movement is never the work of one individual. In this course, students will investigate the specific case of Los Alamos scientist Wen Ho Lee and the media advocacy that aided in his release from solitary confinement after being accused of spying for China. Students will then analyze the role the public and news media frequently must play in the success of a cause, ultimately developing a website that publishes resources and interventions including students own digital media that moves a civil rights issue of their choice. For course video and full description, visit https://undergrad.stanford.edu/courses/additional-elective-courses/game-set-match-shaping-publics-shape-movements.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

PWR 91NSC: Intermediate Writing: Introduction to Science Communication

With the growing impact of science and technology on our society, the need for communicating that science well has never been greater. But what is effective science communication? Is it ever ok to use jargon? Is it ok to say "I" in my research report? How do I communicate complex topics in simple, but accurate, ways? In this course, we will explore the variety of formats that science communication can take--from technical research papers on particle physics to children's books about genetics. We will explore how different audiences shape the way science is communicated, and we will develop a set of best practices for effective science communication. Students will then apply these strategies in their own science communication projects. Prerequisite: PWR 2 or its equivalent. For more information, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/explore/nsc. Required of students admitted into the Notation for Science Communication after January 2015.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4
Instructors: Polk, E. (PI)

PWR 91OID: Creating Your Digital Presence: The What, How, and Why of Building an Online Presence

Have you ever Googled yourself? If so, what information about you rises to the top? A picture of you in your band uniform from your high school? A poem you wrote and published on your Tumblr? Maybe your scores from a 5K you ran last year? nnIt might seem like you do not have much control over what you see about yourself in a Google search, but the fact is, you do. The more of your own content you create, the more that your self-created information will rise to the top. In this class, you will select content most significant to you, which could include research posters, photo essays, short stories, interviews, prototypes, and beyond. To curate and polish these pieces, we will ask ¿how can you craft an online identity that shares not only your accomplishments, but also your motivations?¿, ¿what makes your best work meaningful?¿, and ¿what platform will best allow you to showcase your identity?¿ Through learning the theories, tools, and techniques behind digital content management, this c more »
Have you ever Googled yourself? If so, what information about you rises to the top? A picture of you in your band uniform from your high school? A poem you wrote and published on your Tumblr? Maybe your scores from a 5K you ran last year? nnIt might seem like you do not have much control over what you see about yourself in a Google search, but the fact is, you do. The more of your own content you create, the more that your self-created information will rise to the top. In this class, you will select content most significant to you, which could include research posters, photo essays, short stories, interviews, prototypes, and beyond. To curate and polish these pieces, we will ask ¿how can you craft an online identity that shares not only your accomplishments, but also your motivations?¿, ¿what makes your best work meaningful?¿, and ¿what platform will best allow you to showcase your identity?¿ Through learning the theories, tools, and techniques behind digital content management, this class will help you get better connected with the individuals and/or organizations that interest you. nnWe will practice several pragmatic techniques for building our own personal ePortfolio (i.e. a website). Through participating in hands-on activities, storytelling exercises, and in-class discussions, you will have the opportunity to enact what we¿re learning and to experiment with different forms of expressing yourself online.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

PWR 91RS: Intermediate Writing: Communicating Bioinformation

Effective communication of expert knowledge in the sciences to non-specialist audiences. Project-based work on a range and variety of communication challenges, contexts, and media. For students who have completed the first two levels of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/explore/notation-science-writing.
Last offered: Spring 2014

PWR 91SP: Intermediate Writing: Doctors' Stories: The Rhetoric of Illness and Healing

While medicine is a science that relies on meticulous research and professional protocols, it is also full of characters, conflicts, scenes, dialogues, and resolutions; in other words, stories. This course explores why we must value communication in medicine and how narratives mediate that communication. During the quarter, you will pursue independent research on a topic of your choice in the health sciences and practice interviewing experts as well as writing accurate and engaging science journalism in a number of genres: the story pitch, the news story, and the profile. Your final project will be a research-based digital magazine story coached by the Stanford Storytelling Project.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

PWR 91TB: Intermediate Writing: Being ____ at Stanford

In this course, we will use two central methods autoethnography, which studies ourselves as participants in cultures; and institutional research, into the archives of Stanford to theorize ourselves as part of Stanford's past, present, and future. Paying special attention to our reading and writing practices, we will use autoethnographic writing prompts to better understand our own identities and experiences, and archival and ethnographic research to investigate specific institutions, events, or practices at Stanford. Ultimately, students will produce a major final project (20-25 pages, 6-10 audiovisual minutes, an installation) that integrates their autoethnographic findings (about you) with their institutional findings (about Stanford). This course is an opportunity to better understand yourself, your university, and the politics of language.
Last offered: Spring 2019
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