2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 
  COVID-19 Scheduling Updates!
See Stanford's HealthAlerts website for latest updates concerning COVID-19 and academic policies.

221 - 230 of 356 results for: all courses

NATIVEAM 16: Native Americans in the 21st Century: Encounters, Identity, and Sovereignty in Contemporary America (ANTHRO 16, ARCHLGY 16)

What does it mean to be a Native American in the 21st century? Beyond traditional portrayals of military conquests, cultural collapse, and assimilation, the relationships between Native Americans and American society. Focus is on three themes leading to in-class moot court trials: colonial encounters and colonizing discourses; frontiers and boundaries; and sovereignty of self and nation. Topics include gender in native communities, American Indian law, readings by native authors, and Indians in film and popular culture.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul

NATIVEAM 116: Decolonizing the Indigenous Classroom (CSRE 116, CSRE 302, EDUC 186, EDUC 286)

Using Indigenous and decolonizing perspectives on education, this interdisciplinary course will examine interaction and language in cross-cultural educational situations, including language, literacy and interethnic communication as they relate to Indigenous American classrooms. Special attention will be paid to implications of social, cultural and linguistic diversity for educational practice, along with various strategies for bridging intercultural differences between schools and Native communities.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

NATIVEAM 139: American Indians in Contemporary Society (SOC 139, SOC 239)

(Graduate students register for 239.) The social position of American Indians in contemporary American society, 1890 to the present. The demographic resurgence of American Indians, changes in social and economic status, ethnic identification and political mobilization, and institutions such as tribal governments and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Recommended: 138 or a course in American history.
Last offered: Spring 2015 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul

OSPAUSTL 40: Australian Studies: History, Society and Culture Down Under

Introduction to Australian society, history, culture, politics, and identity. Social and cultural framework and working understanding of Australia in relationship to the focus on coastal environment in other program courses. Field trips.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

OSPBER 66: Theory from the Bleachers: Reading German Sports and Culture

German culture past and present through the lens of sports. Intellectual, societal, and historical-political contexts. Comparisons to Britain, France, and the U.S. The concepts of Körperkultur, Leistung, Show, Verein, and Haltung. Fair play, the relation of team and individual, production and deconstruction of sports heroes and heroines, and sports nationalism. Sources include sports narrations and images, attendance at sports events, and English and German texts. Will be taught in German if there are enough students with sufficient knowledge of German.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-A-II

OSPBER 126X: A People's Union? Money, Markets, and Identity in the EU

The institutional architecture of the EU and its current agenda. Weaknesses, strengths, and relations with partners and neighbors. Discussions with European students. Field trips; guest speakers.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI

OSPBER 174: Sports, Culture, and Gender in Comparative Perspective

Theory and history of mass spectator sports and their role in modern societies. Comparisons with U.S., Britain, and France; the peculiarities of sports in German culture. Body and competition cultures, with emphasis on the entry of women into sports, the modification of body ideals, and the formation and negotiation of gender identities in and through sports. The relationship between sports and politics, including the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games. In German. Prerequisite: completion of GERLANG 3 or equivalent.
Last offered: Spring 2020 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED

OSPCPTWN 36: The Archaeology of Southern African Hunter Gatherers

Archaeology, history and ethnography of the aboriginal hunter gatherers of southern Africa, the San people. Formative development of early modern humans and prehistory of hunters in southern Africa before the advent of herding societies; rock paintings and engravings of the subcontinent as situated in this history. Spread of pastoralism throughout Africa. Problems facing the descendants of recent hunter gatherers and herders in southern Africa, the Khoisan people.
Last offered: Summer 2020 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI

OSPCPTWN 38: Genocide: African Experiences in Comparative Perspective

Genocide as a major social and historical phenomenon, contextualized within African history. Time frame ranging from the extermination of indigenous Canary Islanders in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries to more recent mass killings in Rwanda and Darfur. Emphasis on southern African case studies such Cape San communities and the Herero people in Namibia. Themes include: roles of racism, colonialism and nationalism in the making of African genocides. Relevance of other social phenomena such as modernity, Social Darwinism, ethnicity, warfare and revolution. Comparative perspective to elucidate global dimensions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED

OSPFLOR 46: Images of Evil in Criminal Justice

Iconographic component of criminal law; reasons and functions of the visual representation of criminal wrongdoing. Historical roots of "evil typecasting;" consideration of its variations with respect to common law and civil law systems. Fundamental features of the two legal systems. Sources, actors, enforcement mechanisms of the criminal law compared; study of cases in the area of murder, sex offences, organized crime and terrorism. Different techniques of image typecasting highlighted and discussed. International criminal law, which takes the burden to describe, typecast and punish forms of "enormous, disproportionate evil," such as genocide and other mass atrocities.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ER
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints