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101 - 110 of 320 results for: all courses

ECON 180: Honors Game Theory

Rigorous introduction to game theory and applications. Topics include solution concepts for static and dynamic games of complete and incomplete information, signaling games, repeated games, bargaining, and elements of cooperative game theory. Applications mainly from economics, but also political science, biology, and computer science. Prerequisites: Experience with abstract mathematics and willingness to work hard. No background in economics required.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR, WAY-SI

EDUC 112: Urban Education (AFRICAAM 112, CSRE 112X, EDUC 212, SOC 129X, SOC 229X)

(Graduate students register for EDUC 212 or SOC 229X). Combination of social science and historical perspectives trace the major developments, contexts, tensions, challenges, and policy issues of urban education.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED

EDUC 115N: How to Learn Mathematics

What is going on in mathematics education in the United States? Why do so many people hate and fear math? What contributes to the high levels of innumeracy in the general population? Why do girls and women opt out of math when they get a chance? In this seminar we will consider seminal research on math learning in K-12 classrooms, including a focus on equity. We will spend time investigating cases of teaching and learning, through watching videos and visiting schools. This seminar is for those who are interested in education, and who would like to learn about ways to help students (and maybe yourselves?) learn and enjoy mathematics. If you have had bad math experiences and would like to understand them - and put them behind you - this seminar will be particularly good for you. The final project for this class will involve developing a case of one or more math learners, investigating their journeys in the world of math.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

EDUC 120C: Education and Society (EDUC 220C, SOC 130, SOC 230)

The effects of schools and schooling on individuals, the stratification system, and society. Education as socializing individuals and as legitimizing social institutions. The social and individual factors affecting the expansion of schooling, individual educational attainment, and the organizational structure of schooling.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

EDUC 136: World, Societal, and Educational Change: Comparative Perspectives (EDUC 306D, SOC 231)

Theoretical perspectives and empirical studies on the structural and cultural sources of educational expansion and differentiation, and on the cultural and structural consequences of educational institutionalization. Research topics: education and nation building; education, mobility, and equality; education, international organizations, and world culture.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

EDUC 186: Decolonizing the Indigenous Classroom (CSRE 116, CSRE 302, EDUC 286, NATIVEAM 116)

Using Indigenous and decolonizing perspectives on education, this interdisciplinary course will examine interaction and language in cross-cultural educational situations, including language, literacy and interethnic communication as they relate to Indigenous American classrooms. Special attention will be paid to implications of social, cultural and linguistic diversity for educational practice, along with various strategies for bridging intercultural differences between schools and Native communities.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

ENGLISH 172D: Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE 196C, PSYCH 155, SOC 146, TAPS 165)

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows. Includes an optional Haas Center for Public Service certified Community Engaged Learning section. In accordance with Stanford virtual learning policies implemented for the Spring Quarter, all community engagement activities for this section will be conducted virtually. Please sign up for section 2 #33285 with Kendra, A. if you are interested in participating in virtual community engagement.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Al-Saber, S. (PI)

ENGR 145: Technology Entrepreneurship (ENGR 145S)

How does the entrepreneurship process enable the creation and growth of high-impact enterprises? Why does entrepreneurial leadership matter even in a large organization or a non-profit venture? What are the differences between just an idea and true opportunity? How do entrepreneurs form teams and gather the resources necessary to create a successful startup? Mentor-guided projects focus on analyzing students' ideas, case studies allow for examining the nuances of innovation, research examines the entrepreneurial process, and expert guests allow for networking with Silicon Valley's world-class entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. For undergraduates of all majors with interest in startups the leverage breakthrough information, energy, medical and consumer technologies. No prerequisites. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

ENGR 145S: Technology Entrepreneurship (ENGR 145)

How does the entrepreneurship process enable the creation and growth of high-impact enterprises? Why does entrepreneurial leadership matter even in a large organization or a non-profit venture? What are the differences between just an idea and true opportunity? How do entrepreneurs form teams and gather the resources necessary to create a successful startup? Mentor-guided projects focus on analyzing students' ideas, case studies allow for examining the nuances of innovation, research examines the entrepreneurial process, and expert guests allow for networking with Silicon Valley's world-class entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. For undergraduates of all majors with interest in startups the leverage breakthrough information, energy, medical and consumer technologies. No prerequisites. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI, GER:DB-SocSci

ENGR 159Q: Japanese Companies and Japanese Society (MATSCI 159Q)

Preference to sophomores. The structure of a Japanese company from the point of view of Japanese society. Visiting researchers from Japanese companies give presentations on their research enterprise. The Japanese research ethic. The home campus equivalent of a Kyoto SCTI course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
Instructors: Sinclair, R. (PI)
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