2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 
  COVID-19 Scheduling Updates!
See Stanford's HealthAlerts website for latest updates concerning COVID-19 and academic policies.

141 - 150 of 179 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 442: Art History in the First Person

Course Description: This seminar considers the use of the first person voice in a wide range of writings about art, from fiction to criticism to scholarship. Insofar as graduate students have typically been discouraged from using the first person voice in their scholarly work, we will question the benefits and drawbacks of doing so in particular cases. To what ends have different writers put the first person voice and how do they integrate it with others strategies of written expression? How might we distinguish among different forms of speaking from the position of ¿I¿ in art-historical writing? What kind of ¿I¿ is at stake¿personal, professional, intellectual, imaginary, or otherwise?nnRequirements: Students will be required to attend all seminar meetings and participate actively in discussion. They will submit two types of writing assignments: The first, which each student will prepare on a rotating basis, will be a 2-page response to a selected reading that will serve to launch discussion of that text in seminar. The second, longer paper (12-15 pages) will involve original research on a selected object or exhibition and the writing of a paper that adopts the first person voice to some degree or explains its necessary rejection.
Last offered: Winter 2020

ARTHIST 443: Networks: A Visual History

Networks are maps for thinking. They illustrate connections while shaping mental journeys, transforming our self-reflexivity along the way. In this course, we will study the metamorphoses of networks, from medieval genealogies to Renaissance cartographic systems and from modern mnemotechnic diagrams to today's visualizations of brain connectivity to ask questions about the politics of connectivity, the deceptions of graphic simplicity, and the capacity of infographics to turn into art.

ARTHIST 444: Counter-Institution: Performance and Institutional Critique (TAPS 342)

What are institutions? How do they think? What motivates their actions? What is their relationship to communities and individual artists? Do they promote or constrain free artistic exploration? These are some of the questions that have been animating critique of institutions in Western art over the past several decades. Contemporaneous with performance art, institutional critique transformed and expanded the very idea of this art practice. In asking, for example, how a museum performs, what it performs, and for whom, institutional critique points to its own position inside complex institutional web generated by modern capitalist society. In this class, we will look at sources of institutional critique in the work of Kazimir Malevich and Marcel Duchamp, the representatives of the first generation such as Adrian Piper, Hans Haacke and Art & Language, and the second generation, such as Fred Wilson and Andrea Frazer, to recent engagements with institutional critique by artists such as Hito Steyerl.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

ARTHIST 448: The Body in Film and other Media (FILMSTUD 448)

In this seminar, we will consider the body on screen as well as the body before the screen i.e. the spectator but also the profilmic body of the actor to examine corporeal performance and reception. The dancing body, the comic body, dead and live bodies, the monstrous body, the body in pain, the virtual body all raise questions about embodiment, liveness, and performance. We will read the body in audiovisual culture through an engagement with affect theory, focusing on the labor of performance, the construction of stardom, spatial and temporal configurations of the performing body, and the production of affect and sensation in the spectating body. Through a discussion of make-up, fashion, the labor of producing the idealized star body from the meat-and-bones body of the actor, or body genres where the spectator's body is beside itself with sexual pleasure, fear and terror, or overpowering sadness, we will inquire into ideologies of discipline and desire that undergird mediatized bodies more »
In this seminar, we will consider the body on screen as well as the body before the screen i.e. the spectator but also the profilmic body of the actor to examine corporeal performance and reception. The dancing body, the comic body, dead and live bodies, the monstrous body, the body in pain, the virtual body all raise questions about embodiment, liveness, and performance. We will read the body in audiovisual culture through an engagement with affect theory, focusing on the labor of performance, the construction of stardom, spatial and temporal configurations of the performing body, and the production of affect and sensation in the spectating body. Through a discussion of make-up, fashion, the labor of producing the idealized star body from the meat-and-bones body of the actor, or body genres where the spectator's body is beside itself with sexual pleasure, fear and terror, or overpowering sadness, we will inquire into ideologies of discipline and desire that undergird mediatized bodies. nnNo prior engagement with film studies is required. Students are encouraged to write seminar papers that build on current research interests.nnNOTE: Instructor consent required for undergraduate students (only seniors may enroll). Please contact the instructor for permission to enroll if you're an undergraduate senior.
Last offered: Winter 2020

ARTHIST 450: Art in the Age of Precarity

Art and precarity in the age of neoliberalism. How artists and critics engage questions of immaterial labor, human capital, structural racism, environmental crisis, the anthropocene and other current issues in their work. The question of art as activism and social practice relative to such themes. Enrollment contingent upon permission of instructor; permission numbers will be provided by staff upon professor's approval.
Last offered: Spring 2018

ARTHIST 456: What Was Photography? (ARTHIST 256)

Digital imaging has largely replaced darkroom work over the past quarter century, yet analog practices still dominate theories of photography. Working closely with the Capital Group Foundation Collection at the Cantor, this class will explore how those theories relate to vintage photographic prints and whether they are still relevant to the photography being produced today. Students will select one photographer within the Collection and create a set of writings that help contemporary viewers see these mid-century American artists through diverse contemporary perspectives.

ARTHIST 460: Meta-Pictures

What happens to a painting or a photograph when it depicts another representation inside itself? Either as a window or as a literal other picture, or even in the portrayal of a shadow cast by a tree (itself a kind of representation), works of art change their nature, expanding their claims on our imagination, when they portray these "other worlds" that both consolidate and destroy the main picture they inhabit. Focusing on Victor Stoichita's The Self-Aware Image (1997), among other texts, we will discuss Renaissance and Baroque painting primarily but with ample room for students to write final papers on meta-pictures from many eras and places.
Last offered: Autumn 2019

ARTHIST 464: American Art and Anthropology

This graduate seminar will address the intertwined histories of American art and anthropology from 1850-1950. During this period, the discipline of anthropology underwent a fundamental shift from a preoccupation with scientific racism to an emphasis on cultural pluralism. How did anthropology¿s transforming conception of ¿culture¿ inflect interethnic artistic exchange and the emergence of American modernism? Key subjects of inquiry will include racial objectification, the colonial gaze, ¿outsider¿ art, documentary and ethnographic film, and cultural appropriation.
Last offered: Spring 2019

ARTHIST 465: Media Technology Theory (COMM 384, FILMSTUD 465A)

This course surveys major theoretical approaches to the study of media technologies, including Frankfurt School critical theory, media archaeology, actor network theory, science and technology studies, platform studies and theories of critical making. By the end of the course, students should have a rich familiarity with the literature in this area, as well as with exemplary empirical studies conducted within each tradition. Preference to Ph.D. students in Communication and Art and Art History. Consent of instructor required for non-PhD students.
Last offered: Spring 2020

ARTHIST 465A: Word and Image (ARTHIST 265A, COMPLIT 225, ITALIAN 265, ITALIAN 365)

What impact do images have on our reading of a text? How do words influence our understanding of images or our reading of pictures? What makes a visual interpretation of written words or a verbal rendering of an image successful? These questions will guide our investigation of the manifold connections between words and images in this course on intermediality and the relations and interrelations between writing and art from classical antiquity to the present. Readings and discussions will include such topics as the life and afterlife in word and image of Ovid's "Metamorphoses," Dante's "Divine Comedy," Ludovico Ariosto's "Orlando Furioso," and John Milton's "Paradise Lost;" the writings and creative production of poet-artists Michelangelo Buonarroti, William Blake, and Dante Gabriel Rossetti; innovations in and correspondences between literature and art in the modern period, from symbolism in the nineteenth century through the flourishing of European avant-garde movements in the twentieth century.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Prodan, S. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints