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171 - 180 of 202 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 460: Meta-Pictures

What happens to a painting or a photograph when it depicts another representation inside itself? Either as a window or as a literal other picture, or even in the portrayal of a shadow cast by a tree (itself a kind of representation), works of art change their nature, expanding their claims on our imagination, when they portray these "other worlds" that both consolidate and destroy the main picture they inhabit. Focusing on Victor Stoichita's The Self-Aware Image (1997), among other texts, we will discuss Renaissance and Baroque painting primarily but with ample room for students to write final papers on meta-pictures from many eras and places.
Last offered: Autumn 2019

ARTHIST 464: American Art and Anthropology

This graduate seminar will address the intertwined histories of American art and anthropology from 1850-1950. During this period, the discipline of anthropology underwent a fundamental shift from a preoccupation with scientific racism to an emphasis on cultural pluralism. How did anthropology¿s transforming conception of ¿culture¿ inflect interethnic artistic exchange and the emergence of American modernism? Key subjects of inquiry will include racial objectification, the colonial gaze, ¿outsider¿ art, documentary and ethnographic film, and cultural appropriation.
Last offered: Spring 2019

ARTHIST 465: Media Technology Theory (COMM 384, FILMEDIA 465A)

This course surveys major theoretical approaches to the study of media technologies, including Frankfurt School critical theory, media archaeology, actor network theory, science and technology studies, platform studies and theories of critical making. By the end of the course, students should have a rich familiarity with the literature in this area, as well as with exemplary empirical studies conducted within each tradition. Preference to Ph.D. students in Communication and Art and Art History. Consent of instructor required for non-PhD students.
Last offered: Spring 2020

ARTHIST 465A: Word and Image (ARTHIST 265A, COMPLIT 225, ITALIAN 265, ITALIAN 365)

What impact do images have on our reading of a text? How do words influence our understanding of images or our reading of pictures? What makes a visual interpretation of written words or a verbal rendering of an image successful? These questions will guide our investigation of the manifold connections between words and images in this course on intermediality and the relations and interrelations between writing and art from classical antiquity to the present. Readings and discussions will include such topics as the life and afterlife in word and image of Ovid's "Metamorphoses," Dante's "Divine Comedy," Ludovico Ariosto's "Orlando Furioso," and John Milton's "Paradise Lost;" the writings and creative production of poet-artists Michelangelo Buonarroti, William Blake, and Dante Gabriel Rossetti; innovations in and correspondences between literature and art in the modern period, from symbolism in the nineteenth century through the flourishing of European avant-garde movements in the twentieth century.
Last offered: Autumn 2020

ARTHIST 468: Encountering Contemporary Chinese Painting: Media and Themes (ARTHIST 268)

Two spring quarter exhibitions -- oil paintings and drawings by Zeng Fanzhi at the Anderson Collection, and Ink Worlds with works by two dozen major ink painters, calligraphers and video essayists at the Cantor -- convey part of the diversity of contemporary Chinese art practice. This seminar will explore media and techniques, artistic careers and strategies, and questions of cultural identity, history, place, language and the visionary presented by these artists and exhibitions.
Last offered: Spring 2018

ARTHIST 469: Drugs and the Visual Imagination (FILMEDIA 469)

Drugs have profoundly shaped human culture across space and time, from ancient cave paintings to the psychedelic Sixties and contemporary opioid epidemic. This seminar explores the relationship between visual culture and "drugs," broadly conceived, asking how consciousness-altering substances have been understood and represented in various contexts. We will examine how drugs blur boundaries between nature and culture and describe major symbolic, narrative, and aesthetic structures by considering representations of drug use across media. This interdisciplinary seminar integrates perspectives from art, literature, popular culture, theory, film, philosophy, and science. Topics include perception, subjectivity, addiction, deviancy, capitalism, politics, technology, globalization, and critical approaches to race, class, sexuality, and gender. Limited to graduate students; undergraduates must contact instructor for permission (seniors only).
Terms: Spr | Units: 5

ARTHIST 471: Art & Fashion

This course will engage the interface between art and fashion through the lens of a Cantor Arts Center 2018 exhibition: The Art of the Brand: Mondrian, Saint Laurent and Pop Art in America. Students will write essays on objects in the exhibition for publication in the accompanying catalogue and for wall texts. The course explores the concept of branding as a means to organize new thinking about the relationship between classic modernism, fashion, and the ways in which pop artists (Lichtenstein, Segal, Warhol, Wesselmann) dealt with abstraction and figuration, originality and reproduction, elite and mass culture, in the process reinventing Mondrian¿s style as a brand that brings Warhol¿s Campbell¿s treatment of soup cans to mind.
Last offered: Winter 2018

ARTHIST 473: Couture Culture (ARTHIST 273)

Fashion, art, and representation in Europe and the US between 1860 and today. Beginning with Baudelaire, Impressionism, the rise of the department store and the emergence of haute couture, culminating in the spectacular fashion exhibitions mounted at the Metropolitan and other major art museums in recent years. Students participate actively in class discussion and pursue related research projects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5
Instructors: Troy, N. (PI)

ARTHIST 474A: Uncanny Lives: Encounters with the Humanoid

From murderous dolls to evil doppelgängers, humanoid doubles haunt the Western cultural imagination. Beginning with an in-depth look at the contested concept of the "uncanny", the seminar traces the history of anxiety about non-human humans in the West. An interdisciplinary inquiry, this course draws its sources from art, film, literature, psychology, and science.
Last offered: Autumn 2020

ARTHIST 475: Media Cultures of the Cold War (COMM 386)

The intersection of politics, aesthetics, and new media technologies in the U.S. between the end of WW II and the fall of the Berlin Wall. Topics include the aesthetics of thinking the unthinkable in the wake of the atom bomb; abstract expressionism and 'modern man' discourse; game theory, cybernetics, and new models of art making; the rise of television, intermedia, and the counterculture; and the continuing influence of the early cold war on contemporary media aesthetics. Readings from primary and secondary sources in art history, communication, and critical theory.
Last offered: Winter 2021
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