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41 - 50 of 175 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 183: Theatre of the World: Contemporary Chinese Art (ARTHIST 383)

This course examines the intense and profound changes in Chinese Art from the end of Cultural Revolution to the first decades of the twenty-first century. Multiple course meetings will take place in the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, where the exhibition Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World will be on view. We will explore how artists express their ways of grappling with the social, political, economic, and personal issues through art. Major topics include cultural multiplicity, global challenge, consumerism, site specificity, and deconstructing and reconstructing of identities, among others. Our discussions will constantly incorporate factors of China's domestic context, global network, and artists' individual connections in order for students to understand the rich and complex dynamics of Chinese contemporary art.
Last offered: Winter 2019

ARTHIST 185: Arts of China in the Early Modern World, 1550-1800 (ARTHIST 385)

The dynamic period of late Ming and early Qing dynasty China, roughly 1500-1800 CE, was marked by political crisis and conquest, but also by China's participation in global systems of trade and knowledge exchanges involving porcelain, illustrated books, garden designs and systems of perspectival representation. Topics will include Innovations in urban centers of painting and print culture, politically inflected painting, and cultural syncretism in court painting and garden design.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum
Instructors: Vinograd, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 186B: Asian American Art: 1850-Present (AMSTUD 186D, ASNAMST 186B)

What does it mean, and what has it meant historically, to be "Asian American" in the United States? This lecture course explores this question through the example of artists, craftspeople, and laborers of Asian descent. We will consider their work alongside the art, visual culture, and literature of the United States. Key themes will include the history of immigration law; questions of home and belonging; art, activism, and community; interethnic solidarity; and gender and queerness. Artists and authors will include Isamu Noguchi, Grace Lee Boggs, Nam June Paik, Yoko Ono, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, Grace Lee Boggs, Zarina, Carlos Villa, Takashi Murakami, Anne Cheng, Lisa Lowe, among many others. In addition to learning the history of Asian Americans and reading key texts in Asian American studies, this course will also teach the foundational skills of close looking and primary source research.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ARTHIST 191: African American Art (AFRICAAM 191B, CSRE 191)

This course explores major art and political movements, such as the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, and #BlackLivesMatter, that have informed and were inspired by African American artists. Students will read pivotal texts written by Black artists, historians, philosophers and activists; consider how artists have contended with issues of identity, race, gender, and sexuality; and learn about galleries, collections, and organizations founded to support the field. Attendance on the first day of class is a requirement for enrollment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Salseda, R. (PI)

ARTHIST 194: U.S. Latinx Art (CHILATST 195, CSRE 195)

This course surveys art made by Latinas/os/xs who have lived and worked in the United States since the 1700s, including Chicanos, Nuyoricans, and other Black, Brown, and Indigenous artists. While exploring the diversity of Latinx art, students will consider artists' relationships to identity, race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. Students will also study how artists have responded to and challenged discrimination, institutional exclusion, and national debates through their work. Attendance on the first day of class is a requirement for enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

ARTHIST 202: Inherent Vice (ARTHIST 402)

Taught jointly by an art historian and a senior conservator, this research seminar focuses on selected objects (mostly) of modern and contemporary art many in Stanford collections -- that pose significant condition and/or conservation challenges for long term maintenance and display. Together we will examine the objects in the conservation lab and/or the gallery; students will then confer with appropriate museum staff, consult relevant curatorial and conservation files, research and debate potential treatments, and write up reports of their findings. Issues of aesthetics, ethics and other problems bearing on the material longevity of art will be explored together in class discussions as a foundation for thinking about the preservation and exhibition of works of art.
Last offered: Winter 2019

ARTHIST 203: Artists, Athletes, Courtesans and Crooks (CLASSICS 163)

The seminar examines a range of topics devoted to the makers of Greek art and artifacts, the men and women who used them in life and the afterlife, and the miscreants - from Lord Elgin to contemporary tomb-looters and dealers - whose deeds have damaged, deracinated and desecrated temples, sculptures and grave goods. Readings include ancient texts in translation, books and articles by classicists and art historians, legal texts and lively page-turners. Students will discuss weekly readings, give brief slide lectures and a final presentation on a topic of their choice, which need not be confined to the ancient Mediterranean.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Maxmin, J. (PI)

ARTHIST 203A: Philosophies Behind Architecture: The Work of Antoni Gaudí as a Response to Modernity. (ILAC 203)

The emergence of modern and contemporary Architecture in the West is intimately linked to the background culture that spread across the intellectual centers of Europe and the US between early nineteenth century and the Second World War. Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí (1852-1926) is a major representative of a style of architecture that asks and answers the questions posed by modernity and industrialization with an attitude of resistance. The purpose of this course is to pair these two perspectives: first, an exploration of the history of the most influential movements in Architecture and Interior Design since 1850 and the philosophies and historical events that explain their impact. Second, an elucidation of the originality and relevance of Antoni Gaudí in light of this international context. The course will combine texts by Marx, Smith, Nietzsche, Benjamin, Emerson, Walt Whitman, or Nelson Goodman with those of Cerdà, William Morris, or Adolf Loos, so as to shed light on the most repr more »
The emergence of modern and contemporary Architecture in the West is intimately linked to the background culture that spread across the intellectual centers of Europe and the US between early nineteenth century and the Second World War. Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí (1852-1926) is a major representative of a style of architecture that asks and answers the questions posed by modernity and industrialization with an attitude of resistance. The purpose of this course is to pair these two perspectives: first, an exploration of the history of the most influential movements in Architecture and Interior Design since 1850 and the philosophies and historical events that explain their impact. Second, an elucidation of the originality and relevance of Antoni Gaudí in light of this international context. The course will combine texts by Marx, Smith, Nietzsche, Benjamin, Emerson, Walt Whitman, or Nelson Goodman with those of Cerdà, William Morris, or Adolf Loos, so as to shed light on the most representative buildings and interiors of the period: from the 1851 Crystal Palace of London to the state of La Sagrada Família in 1926, the year Gaudí died. The poles of this history will be represented by industrialization on one side, and autographic craftsmanship on the other. In particular, we will disentangle the tension between creativity and uniformization and their influence in the building of an entire artistic sensibility and culture, in architecture as in politics.
Last offered: Spring 2020

ARTHIST 206: The Alchemy of Art: Substance and Transformation in Artistic Practice (ARTHIST 406)

This seminar considers materiality and processes of material transformation as core elements of artistic practice and the history of making, largely from Sumer (3rd Millennium BCE) until the Early Modern period (18th Century in the West), but with several modern comparisons. Major points of focus will include pre-modern perceptions of the elemental properties of materials as matter, the reflexive relationship between materials and imagination, and the diverse ways in which societies have associated specific substances with social and cultural values. Humanistic perspectives on such issues are augmented by complementary insights from the physical sciences, and references are made to current ideas regarding material agency, affordances, and the imperfect separability of nature and culture. Indeed, a central question underlying all the readings is how to distinguish natural from synthetic: where does nature end and art begin, or maybe where does nature stop?
Terms: Win | Units: 3

ARTHIST 207: The Resurrected Body: Animacy in Medieval Art (ARTHIST 407)

This course explores the relationship of spirit and matter in medieval art and architecture, more specifically how the changing appearance of objects and spaces evokes the presence of the metaphysical as glitter, reverberation, and shadow. We will engage objects and monuments across the Mediterranean, studying the way they were staged in order to produce the perception of liveliness. The phenomenology of liveliness will be tied to the development of the theology of resurrection of the body.
Last offered: Autumn 2019
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