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191 - 200 of 233 results for: ANTHRO

ANTHRO 348P: ProSeminar: Medical Anthropology

This seminar will focus on recent and seminal texts in Medical Anthropology, broadly construed.Prerequisite: by instructor consent
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Jain, S. (PI)

ANTHRO 349: Anthropology of Capitalism

This advanced graduate seminar explores capitalism as an historically-situated and culturally-mediated articulation of practices rather than as an economic system or social structure governed by an internal logic. It draws on poststructural theories of culture, society and subjectivity to investigate the processes through which diverse capitalist practices are produced. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Anthropology or permission of the instructor. Previous graduate level coursework in cultural anthropology, social theory or cultural studies is required. No auditing is permitted. Enrollment limited to 12.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5

ANTHRO 351D: Ideologies and Practices of Creativity

The still-robust Romantic conception of creativity as the attribute of a specific, 'gifted', individual continues to have extraordinary social and political power as an ideological apparatus that shapes and disciplines conduct, aspirations, and subjectivities. This course is a critical anthropological exploration of the following questions: How and why has a deep, naturalized individualism long been foundational to both ideals and practices of creativity? How is it raced and gendered? How have people been rethinking relational, collaborative creative practice?
Last offered: Winter 2020

ANTHRO 353: Landscape

This seminar offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of landscape, noting the various processes and projects that have help create them. Readings draw together a broad range of theoretical approaches that are attentive to human-non-human interactions and the overlapping and divergent spatial and temporal questions of the exchanges between landscapes and humans. The readings will also draw attention to representational and non-representational ways that material and symbolic aspects of landscapes help constitute the making of place. The aim of the seminar is to explore the various methodologies for what they offer for the study of place.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5

ANTHRO 354: Cultural Techniques

Building on the concept of 'cultural techniques,' or 'Kulturtechniken,' that has been developing in recent German media studies, this advanced graduate seminar considers a wide range of culturally specific modes of elementary techniques, from cutting, connecting, to reading, writing, and counting, to cooking, sewing, irrigating, and so on, as ethnographic analytics. The seminar explores the epistemic shift in ethnographic methods and analysis from the symbolic sense of meaning-making to the material condition for such meaning-making. Prerequisite by instructor consent
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Inoue, M. (PI)

ANTHRO 356A: The Universal and the Vernacular. The Global Life of Concepts and Social Forms

Mapping and understanding vernacular concepts and terminologies has always been central to the anthropological quest to understand societies from `a native point of view'. This has often been accompanied by a critique of universalist and Euro-centric assumptions in the social sciences and in social theory. As a result, the convention has become to treat the `universal¿ (ideas, frames, institutions) as external, often imposed by colonial powers, while the `vernacular¿ conventionally is seen as local and authentic, and the proper site of anthropology.nThis course seeks to rethink this spatial and historical distinction between the universal and the vernacular. Instead we ask: how, and when, do concepts, or practices, become embedded in a vernacular world? Reversely, instead of assuming that universals all originate in Euro-America, we ask: how do concepts and practices become both global and universal? We will trace how impactful ideologies, social forms and institutions have travelled i more »
Mapping and understanding vernacular concepts and terminologies has always been central to the anthropological quest to understand societies from `a native point of view'. This has often been accompanied by a critique of universalist and Euro-centric assumptions in the social sciences and in social theory. As a result, the convention has become to treat the `universal¿ (ideas, frames, institutions) as external, often imposed by colonial powers, while the `vernacular¿ conventionally is seen as local and authentic, and the proper site of anthropology.nThis course seeks to rethink this spatial and historical distinction between the universal and the vernacular. Instead we ask: how, and when, do concepts, or practices, become embedded in a vernacular world? Reversely, instead of assuming that universals all originate in Euro-America, we ask: how do concepts and practices become both global and universal? We will trace how impactful ideologies, social forms and institutions have travelled in time to become perceived as elements of vernacular cultures. nDrawing on ethnographic and historical examples across the world, each week will trace the universal and vernacular lives of important concepts such as: `tradition¿, `the individual¿, `community¿, `the people¿; `humanity¿, `dignity¿; `equality¿, `sacrifice¿, `cosmopolitanism¿, `civility¿.
Last offered: Spring 2019

ANTHRO 360A: Archival Research for Social Science: A Practicuum

Since the 1980s, the necessity of historicizing cultural and social formations has become established as integral to anthropological research. Every ethnography and dissertation has historical sections, derived primarily from secondary sources, commentaries within other ethnographies and published historical work. Most students attempt to conduct archival research in local or national archives alongside ethnographic fieldwork, most often in an ad hoc manner, collecting and analyzing archival material on a trial and error basis. This class is conceived as a practicum that addresses students who need to and want to do archival research as part of their anthropological and sociological fieldwork, but find themselves at a loss for how to think about, begin, and, do archival work.nnThe base layer of the class is methodological and practical: students will be engaged in the practical activities of becoming acquainted with archives, developing archival research questions, learning techniques more »
Since the 1980s, the necessity of historicizing cultural and social formations has become established as integral to anthropological research. Every ethnography and dissertation has historical sections, derived primarily from secondary sources, commentaries within other ethnographies and published historical work. Most students attempt to conduct archival research in local or national archives alongside ethnographic fieldwork, most often in an ad hoc manner, collecting and analyzing archival material on a trial and error basis. This class is conceived as a practicum that addresses students who need to and want to do archival research as part of their anthropological and sociological fieldwork, but find themselves at a loss for how to think about, begin, and, do archival work.nnThe base layer of the class is methodological and practical: students will be engaged in the practical activities of becoming acquainted with archives, developing archival research questions, learning techniques of recording, coding, and thinking historically. The second layer will be conceptual. Students will be reading and discussing concepts of the archive, reading and analyzing different styles of historical ethnographies, and thinking about how to organize and conceptualize cultural categories historically.nnStudents will be asked to conduct archival research at the archives available at Stanford Libraries and the Hoover Institution archives and write a research paper based on this archival work. We will have weekly meetings divided into two sessions. The first half will discuss set readings and intellectual concern. In the second half, we will discuss methodological concerns, problems encountered in the archives and bounce ideas off each other. We will also have regular guest speakers who will give talks and answer questions, intellectual and methodological about archival research.
Last offered: Spring 2018

ANTHRO 361: Life and Death in Contemporary Latin America: An Anthropological Inquiry

This seminar explores life and death in contemporary Latin America. We will address anthropological understanding of the role of colonialism, migration, violence, urbanization, democratic transition and neoliberalism as they configure the experience of, and threshold between, vital and deadly processes. nnThis is not a standard survey course, covering the region as a whole however. Instead, we will critically engage several recent ethnographies that explore, for example: the politics and practices of memory; border thinking and living; the political economy of death and desire; state violence and social movements; the relationship between the laboring city and body. We will supplement ethnographies with contemporary Latin American critical theory, film, and literary texts. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Last offered: Winter 2013

ANTHRO 362: Visual Activism and Social Justice

Anthropology and the academy more generally have long valued text, language, and cognition more highly than the image, visuality, and the imagination. Yet, contemporary political movements and strategies for social justice and transformation vividly demonstrate why effective social research needs to study both.nPre-requisite by instructor consent.
Last offered: Autumn 2020

ANTHRO 362A: Visual Anthropology

This course will offer ways of understanding how scholars can attend to, theorize, and use visual documents such as photographs, drawings, prints, forms, charts, etc. in ethnographic work. Prerequisite by Instructor consent.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Jain, S. (PI)
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