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151 - 160 of 336 results for: CSI::certificate

ENERGY 101: Energy and the Environment (EARTHSYS 101)

Energy use in modern society and the consequences of current and future energy use patterns. Case studies illustrate resource estimation, engineering analysis of energy systems, and options for managing carbon emissions. Focus is on energy definitions, use patterns, resource estimation, pollution. Recommended: MATH 21 or 42.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

ENERGY 102: Fundamentals of Renewable Power (EARTHSYS 102)

Do you want a much better understanding of renewable power technologies? Did you know that wind and solar are the fastest growing forms of electricity generation? Are you interested in hearing about the most recent, and future, designs for green power? Do you want to understand what limits power extraction from renewable resources and how current designs could be improved? This course dives deep into these and related issues for wind, solar, biomass, geothermal, tidal and wave power technologies. We welcome all student, from non-majors to MBAs and grad students. If you are potentially interested in an energy or environmental related major, this course is particularly useful. Recommended: Math 21 or 42.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA

ENERGY 104: Sustainable Energy for 9 Billion (ENERGY 206)

This course explores the global transition to a sustainable global energy system. We will formulate and program simple models for future energy system pathways. We will explore the drivers of global energy demand and carbon emissions, as well as the technologies that can help us meet this demand sustainably. We will consider constraints on the large-scale deployment of technology and difficulties of a transition at large scales and over long time periods. Assignments will focus on building models of key aspects of the energy transition, including global, regional and sectoral energy demand and emissions as well as economics of change. Prerequisites: students should be comfortable with calculus and linear algebra (e.g. Math 20, Math 51) and be familiar with computer programming (e.g. CS106A, CS106B). We will use the Python programming language to build our models.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR

ENERGY 171: Energy Infrastructure, Technology and Economics (ENERGY 271)

Oil and gas represents more than 50% of global primary energy. In delivering energy at scale, the industry has developed global infrastructure with supporting technology that gives it enormous advantages in energy markets; this course explores how the oil and gas industry operates. From the perspective of these established systems and technologies, we will look at the complexity of energy systems, and will consider how installed infrastructure enables technology development and deployment, impacts energy supply, and how existing infrastructure and capital invested in fossil energy impacts renewable energy development. Prerequisites: Energy 101 and 102 or permission of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

ENERGY 271: Energy Infrastructure, Technology and Economics (ENERGY 171)

Oil and gas represents more than 50% of global primary energy. In delivering energy at scale, the industry has developed global infrastructure with supporting technology that gives it enormous advantages in energy markets; this course explores how the oil and gas industry operates. From the perspective of these established systems and technologies, we will look at the complexity of energy systems, and will consider how installed infrastructure enables technology development and deployment, impacts energy supply, and how existing infrastructure and capital invested in fossil energy impacts renewable energy development. Prerequisites: Energy 101 and 102 or permission of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

ENERGY 293B: Fundamentals of Energy Processes (EE 293B)

For seniors and graduate students. Covers scientific and engineering fundamentals of renewable energy processes involving heat. Thermodynamics, heat engines, solar thermal, geothermal, biomass. Recommended: MATH 19-21; PHYSICS 41, 43, 45
Terms: Win | Units: 3

ENERGY 301: The Energy Seminar (CEE 301, MS&E 494)

Interdisciplinary exploration of current energy challenges and opportunities, with talks by faculty, visitors, and students. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Weyant, J. (PI)

ENGR 311A: Women's Perspectives

Graduate seminar series, driven by student interests, with guest speakers from academia and industry. Previous themes have included Finding your North, Becoming Fearless, Daydreams to Reality, and Letters to My Younger Self. Discussion is encouraged as graduate students share experiences and learn with speakers and each other. Possible topics of discussion range from time management and career choices to diversity, health, and family. Several optional informal dinners are hosted after the seminar to continue conversation with the speakers. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Sheppard, S. (PI)

ENGR 391: Engineering Education and Online Learning (EDUC 391)

A project based introduction to web-based learning design. In this course we will explore the evidence and theory behind principles of learning design and game design thinking. In addition to gaining a broad understanding of the emerging field of the science and engineering of learning, students will experiment with a variety of educational technologies, pedagogical techniques, game design principles, and assessment methods. Over the course of the quarter, interdisciplinary teams will create a prototype or a functioning piece of educational technology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Bowen, K. (PI)

ENVRES 225: E-IPER Current Topics Seminar

For E-IPER Ph.D and Joint M.S. students only. Weekly presentations of E-IPER students' research and other program-related projects. Occasional guest speakers. Individual or team presentation, active participation, and regular attendance required for credit. May be taken for credit a maximum of two times. Enrollment by department consent only. Contact instructor for permission to enroll.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)
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