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241 - 250 of 293 results for: all courses

OSPPARIS 53: Electricity, Magnetism and Optics with Laboratory

How are electric and magnetic fields generated by static and moving charges, and what are their applications? How is light related to electromagnetic waves? Represent and analyze electric and magnetic fields to understand electric circuits, motors, and generators. Wave nature of light to explain interference, diffraction, and polarization phenomena; geometric optics to understand how lenses and mirrors form images. Workings and limitations of optical systems such as the eye, corrective vision, cameras, telescopes, and microscopes. Discussions based on the language of algebra and trigonometry. An integrated version of Physics 23 and 24, targeted to premedical students who are studying abroad with integrated labs. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 21 or 21S. This course meets the STEM track requirement for the Paris Program during Winter Quarter 2019-2020.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

OSPSANTG 58: Global Change in Chile

Physical, ecological, and human geography of Chile. Perceptions of the Chilean territory and technologies of study. Flora, fauna, and human adaptations to regional environments. Guest lectures; field trips; workshops.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA

OSPSANTG 85: Marine Ecology of Chile and the South Pacific

Relationships among physical processes in the ocean, biological productivity, and the exploitation of resources by high-thropic-level predators including human beings. Characterization of ecological patterns; identification of processes operating on marine systems. Open ocean ecosystems, intertidal and benthic regions of the world's oceans, and ecological research developed along coastal regions, focusing on Chile's 4,000 km coastline.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

PATH 21N: The Living Genome: Implications for Biology and Beyond

IntroSem with Freshmen preference. The human genome carries the instructions for normal human development and reproduction. But it also carries predispositions to disease and clues to our evolution, ancestry, and identity. The genome may also be pliable to environmental influences and genetic engineering. Through directed readings, discussion, and activities, students will learn about the human genome and applications of genome science and technology across diverse disciplines including medicine, comparative biology, evolutionary biology, paternity testing, and forensics. The broad goal is to become informed and engaged about genome science and its implications for both the individual and society. Prerequisites: High School Biology
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Pollack, J. (PI)

PHIL 165: Philosophy of Physics: Space and Time (PHIL 265)

Graduate students register for 265.nnPREREQUISITES: No detailed knowledge of quantum physics or advanced mathematics is presumed. Some background in philosophy, natural science or mathematics will be helpful. Students will benefit from possession of a modicum of mathematical maturity (roughly equivalent to a familiarity with elementary single-variable calculus or the metatheory of first-order logic).
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SMA | Repeatable for credit

PHYSICS 14N: Quantum Information: Visions and Emerging Technologies

What sets quantum information apart from its classical counterpart is that it can be encoded non-locally, woven into correlations among multiple qubits in a phenomenon known as entanglement. We will discuss paradigms for harnessing entanglement to solve hitherto intractable computational problems or to push the precision of sensors to their fundamental quantum mechanical limits. We will also examine challenges that physicists and engineers are tackling in the laboratory today to enable the quantum technologies of the future.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR, WAY-SMA

PHYSICS 15: Stars and Planets in a Habitable Universe

Is the Earth unique in our galaxy? Students learn how stars and our galaxy have evolved and how this produces planets and the conditions suitable for life. Discussion of the motion of the night sky and how telescopes collect and analyze light. The life-cycle of stars from birth to death, and the end products of that life cycle -- from dense stellar corpses to supernova explosions. Course covers recent discoveries of extrasolar planets -- those orbiting stars beyond our sun -- and the ultimate quest for other Earths. Intended to be accessible to non-science majors, material is explored quantitatively with problem sets using basic algebra and numerical estimates. Sky observing exercise and observatory field trips supplement the classroom work.
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

PHYSICS 16: The Origin and Development of the Cosmos

How did the present Universe come to be? The last few decades have seen remarkable progress in understanding this age-old question. Course will cover the history of the Universe from its earliest moments to the present day, and the physical laws that govern its evolution. The early Universe including inflation and the creation of matter and the elements. Recent discoveries in our understanding of the makeup of the cosmos, including dark matter and dark energy. Evolution of galaxies, clusters, and quasars, and the Universe as a whole. Implications of dark matter and dark energy for the future evolution of the cosmos. Intended to be accessible to non-science majors, material is explored quantitatively with problem sets using basic algebra and numerical estimates.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

PHYSICS 17: Black Holes and Extreme Astrophysics

Black holes represent an extreme frontier of astrophysics. Course will explore the most fundamental and universal force -- gravity -- and how it controls the fate of astrophysical objects, leading in some cases to black holes. How we discover and determine the properties of black holes and their environment. How black holes and their event horizons are used to guide thinking about mysterious phenomena such as Hawking radiation, wormholes, and quantum entanglement. How black holes generate gravitational waves and powerful jets of particles and radiation. Other extreme objects such as pulsars. Relevant physics, including relativity, is introduced and treated at the algebraic level. No prior physics or calculus is required, although some deep thinking about space, time, and matter is important in working through assigned problems.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

PHYSICS 18N: Frontiers in Theoretical Physics and Cosmology

Preference to freshmen. The course will begin with a description of the current standard models of gravitation, cosmology, and elementary particle physics. We will then focus on frontiers of current understanding including investigations of very early universe cosmology, string theory, and the physics of black holes.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
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