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1 - 6 of 6 results for: 174B

ARTSTUDI 174B: Creativity in the Age of Facebook: Making Art for and from Networks

This class explores the history, practice and technique of creating art on and for the internet. Discussions, projects and readings focus on the ways in which internet art embodies changing ideas about artistic creation, technology, and interactivity as a way of blurring the line between artist and audience. Setting recent work against the backdrop of earlier moments in contemporary art (found object art, photomontage), this course also situates internet art in the pre-internet tradition of finding new perspectives on, and meanings in, overfamiliar or banal media surroundings. In collaborative and individual projects, students will create visual compositions on online platforms such as NewHive and explore social media interventions, Twitter experiments, crowdsourced work, collections of online found imagery, supercuts, GIFs, and "choose your own adventure"- style online storytelling.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Odell, J. (PI)

CEE 174B: Wastewater Treatment: From Disposal to Resource Recovery

This course builds upon CEE 174A, covering basic hydraulics and the fundamental processes used to treat wastewater. In addition to understanding the details behind the fundamental processes, students will learn to feel comfortable developing initial design criteria (30% designs) for fundamental processes. Students should also develop a feel for the typical values of water treatment parameters and the equipment involved. After covering conventional processes, the class addresses newer processes used to meet emerging treatment objectives, including nutrient removal, composting of biosolids and recycling of wastewater for beneficial uses, including potable reuse. Pre-requisites: CEE 174A.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

MUSIC 174B: Viola

May be repeated for credit a total of 14 times. Admission is by audition only. There is a fee for this class. Please visit http://music.stanford.edu/Academics/LessonSignups.html for class fees and audition information. All participants must enroll. Zero unit enrollment option available with instructor permission. See website: ( http://music.stanford.edu) for policy and procedure.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 15 times (up to 45 units total)

PHIL 174B: Universal Basic Income: the philosophy behind the proposal (ETHICSOC 174X, ETHICSOC 274X, PHIL 274B, POLISCI 338)

The past three decades have seen the elaboration of a vast body of literature on unconditional basic income a radical policy proposal Philippe Van Parijs referred to as a disarmingly simple idea. It consists of a monthly cash allowance given to all citizens, regardless of personal desert and without means test to provide them with a standard of living above the poverty line. The seminar will seek to engage students in normative debates in political theory (feminism, liberalism, republicanism, communism, libertarianism, etc.) by appealing to the concrete example of basic income. It will allow students to learn a great deal about a policy that is gaining tremendous currency in academic and public debates, while discussing and learning about prominent political theorists - many of whom have written against or for basic income at one point in their career.nnThe seminar is open to undergraduate and graduate students in all departments. There are no pre-requisites. We will ask questions such as: is giving people cash no strings attached desirable and just? Would basic income promote a more gender equal society through the remuneration of care-work, or would it risks further entrenching the position of women as care-givers? Would alternative policies be more successful (such as the job guarantees, stakeholder grants or a negative income tax)? How can we test out basic income? What makes for a reliable and ethical basic income pilot? Students in Politics, Philosophy, Public Policy, Social Work, and Sociology should find most of those questions relevant to their interests. Some discussions on how to fund basic income, on the macro-economic implications of basic income and on the existing pilots projects (in Finland, Namibia, India, Canada and the US) may be of interest to Economists; while our readings on the impact of new technologies and artificial intelligence on the future of work and whether a basic income could be a solution, are likely to be on interest to computer scientists and engineers. By the end of the class, students will have an in depth knowledge of the policy and will have developed skills in the normative analysis of public policy. They will be able to deploy those critical and analytical skills to assess a broad range of other policies.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Repeatable for credit

SPECLANG 174B: First-Year Quechua, Second Quarter

Continuation of SPECLANG 174A. Prerequisite: SPECLANG 174A.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Necochea, M. (PI)

SPECLANG 174C: First-Year Quechua, Third Quarter

Continuation of SPECLANG 174B. Prerequisite: SPECLANG 174B.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Language
Instructors: Necochea, M. (PI)
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