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HISTORY 234G: Narrating the British Empire (ENGLISH 234G, HISTORY 334G)

This course will explore the historical and cultural reality of the British Empire in a global and comparative context, through works of fiction and non-fiction, history, memoir and a range of cultural chronicles. What relationship did British colonialism have with modernity and the European Enlightenment, and with neoliberalism and globalization that followed decolonization? Texts: CLR James's Beyond a Boundary,, Jamaica Kincaid's A Small Place, Nirad Chaudhuri's The Autobiography of an Unknown Indian, Alan Paton's Cry, The Beloved Country, Witi Ihimaera's Dear Miss Mansfield.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Satia, P. (PI)

HISTORY 239K: Revolutionary Moments in French Thought (FRENCH 128)

French intellectual and political culture has often been associated with revolutionary attempts to break free from the hold of tradition. Indeed, the concept of "revolution" has itself become a French tradition of sorts. Over the last 500 years, these revolutions have taken place in a number of arenas. In philosophy, René Descartes challenged all traditional learning and defined new principles that were central to the so-called ¿Revolution of the Mind.¿ In religion, Enlightenment thinkers not only advocated the toleration of different faiths but also questioned the veracity of Christianity and of all theistic worldviews. In politics, the French Revolution redefined the very concept of a political revolution and set the stage for modern conceptions of sovereignty. French socialist thinkers of the 19th century, in turn, reshaped the ways their contemporaries thought about socio-economic arrangements. Finally, 20th-century existentialists have attempted to rethink the very purpose of human existence. In this course, we will explore these and other seminal revolutionary moments that not only transformed French society, but that also had implications for European and, indeed, global culture. Taught in English, readings in English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Matytsin, A. (PI)

HISTORY 241E: Hearing and Seeing in the Long Nineteenth Century (HISTORY 341E, MUSIC 186D, MUSIC 286D)

Ideas about vision and hearing in science and culture from 1790 through 1910. The development of sensory physiology in the wake of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason, including Maine de Biran, Goethe, Helmholtz. Treatments of the senses in different spheres of culture and the arts: Baudelaire's flâneur, Impressionist painting, sound-reproduction technologies, the musical avant-garde, early cinema. Case studies include Cézanne, Debussy, and Russolo. Focus is on the complex relationships between science and culture and the role of the senses in the formation of the 'modern' subject. HISTORY241E/341E must be taken for 4 units.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Kieffer, A. (PI)

HISTORY 244: Egyptomania! The Allure of Ancient Egypt Over the Past 3,500 Years (CLASSICS 87)

Why does Egypt fascinate us? From Napoleon¿s invasion to Katy Perry¿s latest music video, we have interpreted ancient Egyptian history and mythology for centuries; in fact, this obsession dates back to the Egyptians themselves. This seminar explores Egyptomania from the Pharaonic period to the 20th century. Topics include: ancient Egypt, Greek historians, medieval Arabic scholars, hieroglyphic decipherment, 19th century travel, 20th century pop culture, and how historians have interpreted this past over the centuries.
| UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Austin, A. (PI)

HISTORY 254: Popular Culture and American Nature

Despite John Muir, Aldo Leopold, and Rachel Carson, it is arguable that the Disney studios have more to do with molding popular attitudes toward the natural world than politicians, ecologists, and activists. Disney as the central figure in the 20th-century American creation of nature. How Disney, the products of his studio, and other primary and secondary texts see environmentalism, science, popular culture, and their interrelationships.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: White, R. (PI)

HPS 60: Introduction to Philosophy of Science (PHIL 60)

The nature of scientific knowledge: evidence and confirmation; scientific explanation; models and theories; objectivity; science, society, and values.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Longino, H. (PI)

HUMBIO 162H: Hysteria and Modern Culture (GERMAN 137, TAPS 169)

The term "hysteria" has been used for centuries to categorize the mysterious ailments of others. This course will focus on the history of hysteria's representation and production from the late nineteenth century through WWI. Readings will include medical writings (Charcot, Bernheim, Freud), plays (Ibsen, Strindberg, Toller), and feminist theory (Cixous, Clément, Diamond). We will also devote some attention to the ongoing influence of the discourse of hysteria on contemporary medical and popular cultures.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Smith, M. (PI)

HUMBIO 167: The Art of Vision

This course concerns eyes and art. It asks how eyes are built, how they process visual information, and how they are affected by diseases that are major problems in our society. These topics are illustrated through fine art and famous artists, and we explore the implications of both normal and abnormal vision for art. There are short diversions into animal eyes and the role of vision in music, literature, and sports.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Marmor, M. (PI)

HUMBIO 175H: Literature and Human Experimentation (AFRICAAM 223, COMPLIT 223, CSRE 123B, MED 220)

This course introduces students to the ways literature has been used to think through the ethics of human subjects research and experimental medicine. We will focus primarily on readings that imaginatively revisit experiments conducted on vulnerable populations: namely groups placed at risk by their classification according to perceived human and cultural differences. We will begin with Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818), and continue our study via later works of fiction, drama and literary journalism, including Toni Morrison's Beloved, David Feldshuh's Miss Evers Boys, Hannah Arendt's Eichmann and Vivien Spitz's Doctors from Hell, Rebecca Skloot's Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, and Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go. Each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical and policy writings of the period; and our ultimate goal will be to understand modes of ethics deliberation that are possible via creative uses of the imagination, and literature's place in a history of ethical thinking about humane research and care.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER
Instructors: Ikoku, A. (PI)

HUMBIO 175L: Literature and Global Health (AFRICAAM 229, AFRICAST 229, COMPLIT 229, CSRE 129B, FRENCH 229, MED 234)

This course examines the ways writers in literature and medicine have used the narrative form to explore the ethics of care in what has been called the developing world. We will begin with an introduction to global health ethics as a field rooted in philosophy and policy that address questions raised by practice in resource-constrained communities abroad. We will then spend the quarter understanding the way literature may deepen and even alter those questions. For instance: how have writers used scenes of practice in Africa, the Caribbean or South Asia to think through ideas of mercy, charity, beneficence and justice? How differently do they imagine such scenes when examining issues of autonomy, paternalism and language? To what extent, then, do novels and memoirs serve as sites of ethical inquiry? And how has literary study revealed the complexities of narrating care for underserved communities, and therefore presented close reading as a mode of ethics for global health? Readings will include prose fiction by Albert Camus, Joseph Conrad, Amitav Ghosh and Susan Sontag as well as physician memoirs featuring Frantz Fanon, Albert Schweitzer, Abraham Verghese and Paul Farmer.
| UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ER
Instructors: Ikoku, A. (PI)
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