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181 - 190 of 335 results for: CSI::certificate

GSBGEN 363: American Economic Policy

One of every five dollars in the American economy will be spent by the federal government this year. This course will examine how federal spending, taxes, deficits and debt affect the U.S. economy and global financial markets, and how the economy affects the federal budget. We will look inside the federal budget to understand entitlement spending, what causes it to grow so fast, how it could be reformed, and why that's so hard to do. We'll understand where the money goes -- how much goes to infrastructure, education, housing, health care, energy and the environment, parks, scientific research, national defense, and other needs. We'll look at the stimulus vs. austerity debate, both within the U.S. and between the U.S. and Europe. We'll look beyond partisan battle lines and explore various fiscal philosophies that sometimes split the political parties. We'll cover the federal budget process from developing the President's budget to enacting individual spending and tax bills, and discuss more »
One of every five dollars in the American economy will be spent by the federal government this year. This course will examine how federal spending, taxes, deficits and debt affect the U.S. economy and global financial markets, and how the economy affects the federal budget. We will look inside the federal budget to understand entitlement spending, what causes it to grow so fast, how it could be reformed, and why that's so hard to do. We'll understand where the money goes -- how much goes to infrastructure, education, housing, health care, energy and the environment, parks, scientific research, national defense, and other needs. We'll look at the stimulus vs. austerity debate, both within the U.S. and between the U.S. and Europe. We'll look beyond partisan battle lines and explore various fiscal philosophies that sometimes split the political parties. We'll cover the federal budget process from developing the President's budget to enacting individual spending and tax bills, and discuss process reforms including spending and deficit reduction targets, a balanced budget amendment, and line item veto. We'll cover the major players in the budget debate and understand where the big and small budget decisions are made. We'll look at federal taxation, where the money comes from, how it affects the economy, and how it might be restructured. We'll examine the recommendations of the President's budget commission and see if we can predict what will become of its recommendations. And we'll see if we, as a class, can solve our nation's fiscal problems as Washington has so far been unable to do.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

GSBGEN 367: Problem Solving for Social Change

Stanford graduates will play important roles in solving many of today's and tomorrow's major societal problems'in areas such as education, health, energy, and domestic and global poverty''that call for actions by nonprofit, business, and hybrid organizations as well as governments. This course teaches skills and bodies of knowledge relevant to these roles, covering topics such as designing, implementing, scaling, and evaluating social strategies; systems thinking; decision making under risk; psychological biases that adversely affect people's decisions; methods for influencing behavior; and pay-for-success programs. The large majority of the course will be devoted to students' working in teams to apply these concepts and tools to an actual problem, with teams choosing whatever problem interests them.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Brest, P. (PI)

GSBGEN 370: Power of You: Women in Leadership

All leaders face a host of challenges, but women leaders encounter an additional set of obstacles and considerations-institutional, economic, cultural-that their men counterparts most likely never will. Women from underrepresented groups experience these challenges even more acutely. GG370 Power of You: Women in Leadership will prepare students to successfully identify and respond to these challenges, and, ideally, transform them into opportunities for growth and advancement. Students will come away from this course with a vast portfolio of strategies, tools and tactics to not only meet these workplace challenges head-on, but also create more inclusive processes, policies and cultures for the future. The course is based on the instructor's `accessible leadership' model that inspires and equips students to access the leader within themselves, empower others to access their own leadership potential, and create greater access through their giving. Through readings and guided, weekly writt more »
All leaders face a host of challenges, but women leaders encounter an additional set of obstacles and considerations-institutional, economic, cultural-that their men counterparts most likely never will. Women from underrepresented groups experience these challenges even more acutely. GG370 Power of You: Women in Leadership will prepare students to successfully identify and respond to these challenges, and, ideally, transform them into opportunities for growth and advancement. Students will come away from this course with a vast portfolio of strategies, tools and tactics to not only meet these workplace challenges head-on, but also create more inclusive processes, policies and cultures for the future. The course is based on the instructor's `accessible leadership' model that inspires and equips students to access the leader within themselves, empower others to access their own leadership potential, and create greater access through their giving. Through readings and guided, weekly written reflections, students will deeply explore issues including, but not limited to: the likeability paradox; sexism in the workplace; diversity, inclusivity, and belonging; intersectional identities; managing voice, narrative and reputation; negotiation through a gendered lens; leadership styles and adaptivity; mentorship and sponsorship; and creating social value. Students will engage directly with industry leaders such as Sheryl Sandberg (Facebook), Meg Whitman (Quibi), Dr. Priscilla Chan (Chan Zuckerberg Initiative), Mary Barra (General Motors), Judy Smith (Smith & Company) and Indra Nooyi (Pepsi Co.), among others.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

GSBGEN 377: Diverse Leadership as an Imperative for Impact

Our society implicitly prizes a particular approach to leadership - but today's cross-sectoral, impact-oriented leader cannot afford to be restricted to a single approach. If we aspire to address challenges across social, economic, and political arenas, with highly charged moral implications and multiple stakeholders, we have an imperative to use all available tools by discovering, celebrating, and advancing diversity in leadership.In this course, we will: (1) study a range of effective leadership approaches; (2) develop broad, transportable skills and frameworks required to lead in any complex setting - business, public sector, nonprofit sector; (3) delve into leadership tradeoffs and tensions; (4) explore and understand our own values and tacit and explicit decision-making criteria; and (5) recognize barriers to diversity and tactics to address them. Guiding questions will include: How does the context shape the solution set? What does inspired and inspiring leadership look like? How more »
Our society implicitly prizes a particular approach to leadership - but today's cross-sectoral, impact-oriented leader cannot afford to be restricted to a single approach. If we aspire to address challenges across social, economic, and political arenas, with highly charged moral implications and multiple stakeholders, we have an imperative to use all available tools by discovering, celebrating, and advancing diversity in leadership.In this course, we will: (1) study a range of effective leadership approaches; (2) develop broad, transportable skills and frameworks required to lead in any complex setting - business, public sector, nonprofit sector; (3) delve into leadership tradeoffs and tensions; (4) explore and understand our own values and tacit and explicit decision-making criteria; and (5) recognize barriers to diversity and tactics to address them. Guiding questions will include: How does the context shape the solution set? What does inspired and inspiring leadership look like? How do race/gender/other identities enter into the equation? How do I develop my own brand of leadership? We will examine contemporary leaders and controversies in education and elsewhere, draw upon timeless historical thinkers, enjoy the wisdom of guest speakers, and work intensively in small groups to highlight challenges, opportunities, and tradeoffs. By exploring a range of approaches and situations, we will strive for deeper understanding of ourselves and of the context to become a more capable, empathetic and effective leaders.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Colby, S. (PI)

GSBGEN 495: Leadership for Society: Race and Power

This course aims to deepen our collective awareness of profound racial disparities in the United States and around the world. Through a series of conversations with a diverse array of prominent leaders, we will explore the role of race in society, how race interacts with structures of power, and how systemic racism manifests itself in day-to-day business and policy decisions. Candid and honest conversations with class guests will expose students to concrete examples of how their future decisions might lead to different outcomes for different people, based on race. Our hope is that this course supports your personal growth and helps prepare you to become the kind of leader our society needs.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)
Instructors: Lowery, B. (PI)

GSBGEN 532: Clean Energy Opportunities

This course examines business models and opportunities related to clean energy, specifically to low-carbon energy. We examine emerging trends for this sector in the context of technological change, business opportunities and the parameters set by public policy.
Terms: Win | Units: 2

GSBGEN 538: Power in Finance

There is a growing sense that both capitalism and democracy are in crisis. How do power structures in the private and public sectors determine economic and political outcomes? Is the focus on financial metrics and markets to blame for the eroding trust in corporations and governments? This interdisciplinary course explores these issues by developing in-depth understanding of the interactions between individuals, corporations, and governments that shape economic and political systems and their evolution. Topics will include the power of media, culture and corporate governance, corporate and investor power, the role of watchdogs, the special power of central banks, whistle-blowers and the justice system. Visitors with extensive relevant experiences and discussions of current events will enrich each class.
Terms: Win | Units: 2

GSBGEN 551: Innovation and Management in Health Care

The health care system accounts for 18% of US GDP and is one of the fastest growing segments of the economy. This two unit class focuses on the interplay and tension between the main players in the health care field - providers of health care services (individual doctors, group practices, integrated health care systems), payors (insurances companies, employers, consumers, and government), patients, and innovator companies (biopharma, medical device, diagnostics, and health care IT). The course is designed for students with a broad diversity of backgrounds and interests who want to better understand the health care business and system. No prior experience in the health care or medical field is assumed or needed. The focus of the class will be primarily on the US health care system, but there will be limited discussion of non-US systems as well. The course is divided into four modules: An overview of the US Health Care System and the interplay between payers, providers, innovators, and p more »
The health care system accounts for 18% of US GDP and is one of the fastest growing segments of the economy. This two unit class focuses on the interplay and tension between the main players in the health care field - providers of health care services (individual doctors, group practices, integrated health care systems), payors (insurances companies, employers, consumers, and government), patients, and innovator companies (biopharma, medical device, diagnostics, and health care IT). The course is designed for students with a broad diversity of backgrounds and interests who want to better understand the health care business and system. No prior experience in the health care or medical field is assumed or needed. The focus of the class will be primarily on the US health care system, but there will be limited discussion of non-US systems as well. The course is divided into four modules: An overview of the US Health Care System and the interplay between payers, providers, innovators, and patients, Provider delivery models, health care information technology, and incentive structures - The relationship between quality, cost, and access - Integrated systems, value-based, and fee for service models - New IT technologies, including electronic data records - The role of information and incentives - Innovator business models and issues - Financing and managing new product development - Clinical trial management and gaining regulatory approval - Marketing, reimbursement, and sales strategies - Business models to drive innovation - Health care system reform The class will be taught primarily from the perspective of a business person operating a company rather than that of a policy maker, academic, or investor. While there will be a few lectures to provide background and frameworks for course topics, most classes will involve a case discussion and prominent guest speakers from the health care industry. Speakers will include CEOs and senior executives from Genomic Health, Blue Shield of California, Tenet Health, Venrock, Burd Health, Verily (Google Health), Myovant, and Stanford Medicine.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Chess, R. (PI)

GSBGEN 559: The Politics, Policy, and Finance for Solving Global Warming

There is increasing scientific consensus that global warming threatens our world. This course explores how the next generation of leaders can use a combination of forward-looking public policy, political power, and financing new technologies to solve this vexing challenge. The course will integrate public policy and politics with finance and real life cases on companies from Nest to Tesla. The instructor will bring regulatory leaders, elected officials and venture capitalists to class to explain how each of these leaders drive change and discuss what obstacles they must overcome in the process. There will be a heavy emphasis on class participation and students will be asked to apply what they've learned in every aspect of their GSB education, from finance and accounting to marketing and organizational behavior. Students will be asked to make their own case on which new technology, piece of legislation, or regulatory mandate will have the greatest impact on solving global warming and what role they see themselves playing in making change.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: Westly, S. (PI)

GSBGEN 565: Political Communication: How Leaders Become Leaders

This year -- 2020 -- will be a fascinating backdrop for the upcoming Presidential and Congressional races. Implications of the pandemic, its dramatic economic impacts, and four years of a non-traditional president are a contextual backdrop not seen in decades. Politics, perhaps like no other arena, provides a rich and dramatic laboratory for studying the art and science of influential communication. Whether it is a local school bond election or a Congressional race, a Presidential debate or a State of the Union Address, the demanding communications of politics provide insights into our own strengths and gaps as a communicator and leader. Political campaigns, by their very nature, are highly visible, oriented toward very specific objectives, and increasingly leverage a variety of new media platforms. They are often emotionally charged, and rife with conflict and drama. The principles of political communications transcend politics, and are useful guides for leaders in business, the non-p more »
This year -- 2020 -- will be a fascinating backdrop for the upcoming Presidential and Congressional races. Implications of the pandemic, its dramatic economic impacts, and four years of a non-traditional president are a contextual backdrop not seen in decades. Politics, perhaps like no other arena, provides a rich and dramatic laboratory for studying the art and science of influential communication. Whether it is a local school bond election or a Congressional race, a Presidential debate or a State of the Union Address, the demanding communications of politics provide insights into our own strengths and gaps as a communicator and leader. Political campaigns, by their very nature, are highly visible, oriented toward very specific objectives, and increasingly leverage a variety of new media platforms. They are often emotionally charged, and rife with conflict and drama. The principles of political communications transcend politics, and are useful guides for leaders in business, the non-profit community, as well as government. How candidates, elected officials, and leaders in all kinds of organizations communicate vision, values, and experience, as well as how they perform in very fluid environments, not the least of which may be during a crisis, has a great deal to do with their career success. In its 12th year, this highly interactive course allows students to explore both theory and practice behind effective positioning and presentation. Students will analyze and evaluate both successful and unsuccessful communications strategies of political campaigns and candidates. They will explore historic examples of US Presidential debates, from Nixon/Kennedy to the present. Further they will experience political events as they happen -- with each class drawing lessons from political developments around the nation and the world. Students will also hone their own strategic communications skills in activities requiring both written and spoken communication. This is not a course in political science, American government, or in public speaking. However, the engaged student will gain insights into those areas as well.The course is taught by David Demarest, former Vice President of Public Affairs for Stanford University. Demarest has broad communications experience across the public and private sector in financial services, education, and government. After serving as Assistant U.S. Trade Representative, and Assistant Secretary of Labor in the Reagan Administration, in 1988 he served as Communications Director for Vice President George H. W. Bush's successful presidential campaign. He then became a member of the White House senior staff as White House Communications Director. After leaving government in 1993, he spent the next decade leading communications for two Fortune 50 companies, before coming to Stanford in 2005.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Demarest, D. (PI)
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