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271 - 280 of 304 results for: PWR

PWR 91CW: Intermediate Writing: Seeing is Believing

In this course, students will study and practice techniques and rhetorics of data visualization based on principles of rhetorical history, visual rhetorics and graphic design as well as cognitive science, design thinking, and other disciplines that inform critical conversations around information display and data visualization. For more information visit https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/additional-elective-courses/seeing-isand-believing-rhetoric-big-data-visualization.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

PWR 91D: Intermediate Writing: Your American Life

In this course, you¿ll read and listen to some of the most moving and insightful pieces of the last decade, explore the important differences between print and oral storytelling, and then script and record your own full-length audio piece. Along the way, we will explore many craft elements that apply equally to print and audio pieces. You will learn, for example, how to organize your material, choose an effective structure, blend dramatization and reflection, ground insights in concrete scenes, create a strong narrative arc, and manage elements such as characterization, description, and dialogue. We will also, of course, explore craft elements unique to the audio form and you will learn how to use your voice and other sonic elements to craft the kind of piece you might hear on This American Life.nnThrough a special arrangement with the Stanford Storytelling Project, in the spring of 2012 this course will feature special sessions with prominent contributors to This American Life. n Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see http://www.stanford.edu/dept/undergrad/cgi-bin/drupal_pwr/advanced_pwr.
Last offered: Autumn 2013 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

PWR 91EE: Intermediate Writing: Saving Lives with Picture Books

Want to help improve the health of mothers and young children in Bangladesh by creating picture books? This is your chance. (No artistic skills required.) You and your classmates will collaboratively create at least one original picture book designed to communicate information about child stimulation, nutrition, water sanitation, hygiene, the dangers of lead, and healthy ways of thinking. You¿ll study the genre of the picture book, explore the culture of Bangladesh, and consult with a team of Stanford-led researchers to create at least one picture book. You¿ll pitch story ideas, create storyboards and dummies, and revise and edit in light of feedback from the team in Bangladesh, as well as some of the mothers participating in the study.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Ellis, E. (PI)

PWR 91F: Finding Your Story

Life challenges us to become aware of the stories that shape us--family stories, cultural mythologies, even popular movies, television shows, and songs--and then create and live our own story. We face this challenge throughout our lives but perhaps most acutely as we move into adulthood; this is the period when we most need to become conscious of stories and their power, to gather wisdom, practices, and resources for finding our own story. This class, designed with seniors in mind, will illuminate and explore these resources and give you the opportunity to reflect deeply, in discussion and writing, on what truly calls to you in this life. We will engage with some of the world's great stories--myths, parables, teaching tales, modern fiction, even aphorisms, koans, and riddles. In them we can find both elements that resonate with our own story and provocations that help us unearth and cultivate our native gifts--the genius in each of us. We will look at short excerpts from masterworks and myths from around the world, all voices in the largest conversation we have as humans, the one that asks: who am I? why am I here? what truly matters? how can I be happy? Together we will investigate how these stories, and stories like them, can be used to help us find our own story. Students in this course will have a special opportunity to meet personally with poet Billy Collins and singer Aimee Mann when they visit campus in April. Does not fulfill NSC requirement. For students who have completed the first level of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first level of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see http://www.stanford.edu/dept/undergrad/cgi-bin/drupal_pwr/advanced_pwr.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

PWR 91JS: Intermediate Writing: Stanford Science Podcast (EARTHSYS 157)

In this course, students will explore how podcasts can be used as a tool for effective science communication. Through a series of workshops and guest speakers, students in this course will learn the necessary journalistic and technical skills to produce high quality podcast episodes, from interviewing and storytelling to audio editing and digital publishing. Podcast episodes will highlight the cutting edge research being done at Stanford, and students will choose specific stories based on their own interests, from earth sciences to public health to big data. Final podcast episodes will be published on iTunes.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Stonaker, J. (PI)

PWR 91KD: Intermediate Writing: Scripting Entertainments (for a Better YouTube)

In its short time on the planet, youtube videos have created their very own viral (and lucrative) culture. But what if the power of internet distribution could be paired with the power of good substantial storytelling? What if the content could be more socially stirring and powerful than "this is me doing crazy adventures" or "this is me pranking someone"¿or "this is me eating $14 avocado toast in PA"? In this seminar, we first break down the various codes and generic features of currently popular vlogs, then apprentice to current scripting techniques being used by playwrights (Anna Deavere Smith, Suzan-Lori Parks) and scriptwriters on shows from Hulu (East Los High), and Prime (Frankenstein Chronicles), then finally turn our hand to the scripting, rehearsing, shooting, and production of our very own 1-3 minute videos. Our goal is to develop the critical, creative, and digital tools to make effective and engaging scripted short videos for the telling of our current stories, for the destabilization of dominant cultural stories, and for the re-stabilization of the two in potent remix.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

PWR 91KS: Intermediate Writing: Design Thinking and Science Communication

Effective communication of expert knowledge in the sciences to non-specialist audiences. Project-based work on a range and variety of communication challenges, contexts, and media. For students who have completed the first two levels of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/explore/notation-science-writing.
Last offered: Autumn 2015 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

PWR 91KSA: Intermediate Writing: Storytelling and Science

What is story? What is storytelling? And why would storytelling be crucial for science communication? In this class we will develop your Story IQ: we will learn how humans evolved to be the storytelling animal, how stories shape our lives, and why and how science communication needs storytelling in order to be relevant to public audiences. We'll move from looking at story architecture, to critiquing story structures (and stories) in science communications, and then to creating compelling stories of our own that communicate and/or correct science research or discovery. For course video and full description, visit https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/additional-elective-courses/science-and-storytelling.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

PWR 91KT: Intermediate Writing: Game Set Match: Shaping Publics to Shape Movements

The success of a movement is never the work of one individual. In this course, students will investigate the specific case of Los Alamos scientist Wen Ho Lee and the media advocacy that aided in his release from solitary confinement after being accused of spying for China. Students will then analyze the role the public and news media frequently must play in the success of a cause, ultimately developing a website that publishes resources and interventions including students own digital media that moves a civil rights issue of their choice. For course video and full description, visit https://undergrad.stanford.edu/courses/additional-elective-courses/game-set-match-shaping-publics-shape-movements.
Last offered: Spring 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

PWR 91NSC: Intermediate Writing: Introduction to Science Communication

With the growing impact of science and technology on our society, the emphasis on communicating that science well has never been greater. But what is effective science communication? Is it ever ok to use jargon? Is it ok to say "I" in my research report? How do I communicate complex topics in simple, but accurate, ways? In this course, we will explore the variety of formats that science communication can take--from technical research papers on particle physics to children's books about genetics. We will explore how different audiences shape the way science is communicated, and we will develop a set of best practices for effective science communication. Students will then apply these strategies in their own science communication projects. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/explore/nsc. Required of students admitted into the Notation for Science Communication after January 2015.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4
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