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1 - 10 of 19 results for: SUSTAIN ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

SUSTAIN 5: Geokids: Earth Sciences Education

Service learning through the Geokids program. Eight weeks of supervised teaching to early elementary students about Earth sciences. Hands-on teaching strategies for science standards-based instruction. Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center for Public Service
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)
Instructors: Saltzman, J. (PI)

SUSTAIN 100: Research Preparation for Undergraduates

For undergraduates planning to conduct research during the summer with faculty in the Doerr School of Sustainability. Readings, oral presentations, proposal development. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)

SUSTAIN 121: Blue Foods for Indonesia: A Human & Planetary Health Action Lab (SUSTAIN 221)

Globally, more than 1 billion people rely on seafood, yet this source of vital nutrition is chronically neglected in discussions about the future of food systems. In 2021, the UN Food Systems Summit brought international attention to the potential of "blue foods," thanks in part to insights and evidence provided by the Stanford-led Blue Food Assessment. Now, the Indonesian Ministry of National Development Planning has asked Stanford to help them build blue foods into Indonesia's national development strategy. Indonesia is the 4th most populous country, home to 278 million people and the most marine biodiversity on the planet. Over the next 18 months, we will work with the Ministry, Indonesian researchers, and NGO partners to develop a Blue Food Assessment for Indonesia that can help policymakers realize the potential of blue foods to meet pressing food system priorities ? improving nutrition, food security, and livelihoods, both nationally and in rural communities. This Blue Foods Acti more »
Globally, more than 1 billion people rely on seafood, yet this source of vital nutrition is chronically neglected in discussions about the future of food systems. In 2021, the UN Food Systems Summit brought international attention to the potential of "blue foods," thanks in part to insights and evidence provided by the Stanford-led Blue Food Assessment. Now, the Indonesian Ministry of National Development Planning has asked Stanford to help them build blue foods into Indonesia's national development strategy. Indonesia is the 4th most populous country, home to 278 million people and the most marine biodiversity on the planet. Over the next 18 months, we will work with the Ministry, Indonesian researchers, and NGO partners to develop a Blue Food Assessment for Indonesia that can help policymakers realize the potential of blue foods to meet pressing food system priorities ? improving nutrition, food security, and livelihoods, both nationally and in rural communities. This Blue Foods Action Lab is the first of a series to help Indonesia implement a far-reaching national program that could transform its food system and could be used as a model for other countries. For Winter quarter the role of the students will be to evaluate successful programs implemented by other nations in the areas of aquaculture, small scale fisheries, blue food tech and justice and inclusion. We will examine current policies, existing datasets and impacts to fish stocks and nutrition. A report will be produced and shared with the Indonesian Ministry and our NGO partner. The practicum seeks graduate and well-qualified undergraduate students in such programs as earth systems, computer science, public policy, international policy, business, sociology, and marine biology. Data-analysis skills are valuable for this work but are not required. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit this Consent Application Form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeMKlbcHBuWn1TZimaKzvrLR7kN3MkigDp_MpKSPZ99eMM-Xg/viewform.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3

SUSTAIN 128: Systems Design for Health: Reimagining Stanford Campus Town Center (DESIGN 261)

Taking a systems approach to health includes the deliberate upstream design of the places we live, learn, work, and play to support living in ways that keep people well - physically, emotionally, financially, and socially. No place at Stanford has more influence on campus health than the campus town center (roughly including Tresidder and White Plaza, the bookstore and post office, and Canfield Court and Meyer Green). In this high-stakes live course, students will explore upstream systems that influence health, health equity, and sustainability on campus. You will reimagine elements of Stanford?s town center to promote health by integrating concepts from public health, systems thinking, and design justice and using tools from product and policy design. Students will offer feedback and prototype new designs that will be presented for consideration to the town center project design team and advisors. This course is designed as an intensive one-week sprint.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

SUSTAIN 135: Data Science for Environmental Business (ECON 185, PUBLPOL 185, SUSTAIN 235)

Are you interested in clean tech and sustainability? Do you like working with data or plan to manage data scientists? Do you want to find a socially impactful job? If so, Data Science for Environmental Business is for you. Each week, we'll have a guest speaker from a utility, venture capital firm, clean tech startup, renewable energy developer, or some other sustainability-related business. We'll do a quantitative case study of one of the speaker's business problems, such as carbon footprint measurement, supply chain decarbonization, techno-economic analysis, where to site renewable energy facilities, how to value electricity storage, or predicting demand for electric vehicles. Then in the next class, we'll discuss the analytical decisions you made on the case study and the business implications of your results. We aim to draw a mix of students from the GSB, engineering, sustainability, data science, computer science, economics, math, and other fields. Students registering through the more »
Are you interested in clean tech and sustainability? Do you like working with data or plan to manage data scientists? Do you want to find a socially impactful job? If so, Data Science for Environmental Business is for you. Each week, we'll have a guest speaker from a utility, venture capital firm, clean tech startup, renewable energy developer, or some other sustainability-related business. We'll do a quantitative case study of one of the speaker's business problems, such as carbon footprint measurement, supply chain decarbonization, techno-economic analysis, where to site renewable energy facilities, how to value electricity storage, or predicting demand for electric vehicles. Then in the next class, we'll discuss the analytical decisions you made on the case study and the business implications of your results. We aim to draw a mix of students from the GSB, engineering, sustainability, data science, computer science, economics, math, and other fields. Students registering through the GSB should expect a roughly standard MBA class workload. Students registering through non-GSB course numbers should expect a serious data science course where you'll learn and apply new methods. We hope to develop a pipeline of students working for the guest speakers and similar firms. Prerequisites: You must know basic statistics and regression analysis (e.g., ECON 102 or 108, CS 129, EARTHSYS 140, HUMBIO 88, POLISCI 150C, or STATS 60 or 101). You should also have at least some experience with data analysis in R, python, Stata, MATLAB, or something similar. If you plan to take microeconomics (e.g., ECON 1, 50, or 51) or empirical environmental economics ( ECON 177), we recommend you take those either beforehand or concurrently.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5

SUSTAIN 210M: Energy Equity Policy Lab: Spatial Planning for Renewables

Even where policy leaders are striving to center equity in rapid energy transitions, the pathways to clean energy economies are often described by techno-economic models that have limited ability to assess the distributional implications of different scenarios. This course focuses on methods to translate high-level, spatially coarse research findings into actionable policy and technology investment decisions at the local scale. Through lab exercises to develop GIS skills, participants will collaborate with a public service partner to select a study area, identify a spatial dataset representing renewable energy candidate project areas, use site suitability analysis, perform statistical summaries of the dataset, and identify portfolios of future renewable energy resources that could inform stakeholder engagement on decarbonization pathways that center equity.Pre-requisite: ESS 164 or equivalent experience, and CEE 107A / EARTHSYS 103 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Hummel, H. (PI)

SUSTAIN 212: Nature-Based Climate Solutions Policy Lab

Nature-based climate solutions can enhance the natural proclivity of landscapes and seascapes to combat climate change by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere while generating co-benefits such as biodiversity, cleaner air and water, and improved resilience in the face of destructive climate impacts. Yet "nature-based climate solutions" (NbS) are not well-defined and a general lack of understanding, experience and information-sharing about NbS is holding back their adoption. In addition, U.S. laws and policies can limit the deployment of NbS. In this policy lab we will work with a non-profit client that invests in a large number of NbS and is interested in identifying and overcoming barriers that are constraining their investments, and in improving how they measure, monitor and verify the climate and other benefits associated with NbS projects. Consent Application: Students interested in enrolling in this policy lab should complete a consent application that includes these elemen more »
Nature-based climate solutions can enhance the natural proclivity of landscapes and seascapes to combat climate change by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere while generating co-benefits such as biodiversity, cleaner air and water, and improved resilience in the face of destructive climate impacts. Yet "nature-based climate solutions" (NbS) are not well-defined and a general lack of understanding, experience and information-sharing about NbS is holding back their adoption. In addition, U.S. laws and policies can limit the deployment of NbS. In this policy lab we will work with a non-profit client that invests in a large number of NbS and is interested in identifying and overcoming barriers that are constraining their investments, and in improving how they measure, monitor and verify the climate and other benefits associated with NbS projects. Consent Application: Students interested in enrolling in this policy lab should complete a consent application that includes these elements: Briefly describe why you are interested in this policy lab; Please describe your prior relevant courses and work experience; Are you willing to attend a Saturday morning session at the law school on Elements of Policy Analysis? Policy Lab Consent Applications are available at SLS Registrar https://registrar.law.stanford.edu/. Applications for this course will be available by February 28.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: Hayes, D. (PI)

SUSTAIN 221: Blue Foods for Indonesia: A Human & Planetary Health Action Lab (SUSTAIN 121)

Globally, more than 1 billion people rely on seafood, yet this source of vital nutrition is chronically neglected in discussions about the future of food systems. In 2021, the UN Food Systems Summit brought international attention to the potential of "blue foods," thanks in part to insights and evidence provided by the Stanford-led Blue Food Assessment. Now, the Indonesian Ministry of National Development Planning has asked Stanford to help them build blue foods into Indonesia's national development strategy. Indonesia is the 4th most populous country, home to 278 million people and the most marine biodiversity on the planet. Over the next 18 months, we will work with the Ministry, Indonesian researchers, and NGO partners to develop a Blue Food Assessment for Indonesia that can help policymakers realize the potential of blue foods to meet pressing food system priorities ? improving nutrition, food security, and livelihoods, both nationally and in rural communities. This Blue Foods Acti more »
Globally, more than 1 billion people rely on seafood, yet this source of vital nutrition is chronically neglected in discussions about the future of food systems. In 2021, the UN Food Systems Summit brought international attention to the potential of "blue foods," thanks in part to insights and evidence provided by the Stanford-led Blue Food Assessment. Now, the Indonesian Ministry of National Development Planning has asked Stanford to help them build blue foods into Indonesia's national development strategy. Indonesia is the 4th most populous country, home to 278 million people and the most marine biodiversity on the planet. Over the next 18 months, we will work with the Ministry, Indonesian researchers, and NGO partners to develop a Blue Food Assessment for Indonesia that can help policymakers realize the potential of blue foods to meet pressing food system priorities ? improving nutrition, food security, and livelihoods, both nationally and in rural communities. This Blue Foods Action Lab is the first of a series to help Indonesia implement a far-reaching national program that could transform its food system and could be used as a model for other countries. For Winter quarter the role of the students will be to evaluate successful programs implemented by other nations in the areas of aquaculture, small scale fisheries, blue food tech and justice and inclusion. We will examine current policies, existing datasets and impacts to fish stocks and nutrition. A report will be produced and shared with the Indonesian Ministry and our NGO partner. The practicum seeks graduate and well-qualified undergraduate students in such programs as earth systems, computer science, public policy, international policy, business, sociology, and marine biology. Data-analysis skills are valuable for this work but are not required. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit this Consent Application Form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeMKlbcHBuWn1TZimaKzvrLR7kN3MkigDp_MpKSPZ99eMM-Xg/viewform.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3

SUSTAIN 222: Philanthropy for Sustainable Development (ETHICSOC 232T, POLISCI 236, POLISCI 236S)

This course teaches students how to pursue social change through philanthropy with a focus on sustainable development. Students learn about the approaches, history, and key debates in philanthropy, and apply their knowledge by collaboratively making a substantial class contribution to one or more select nonprofit organizations. This class responds to the reality confronting all philanthropists: There are many ways in which we can change the world for the better, but our money and time is finite. How then can we best use our limited resources to accomplish change? And how will we know we've been successful? By the end of the course, students will understand the fundamentals of effective philanthropy, including how to define problems, develop a theory of change, evaluate outcomes, and reduce unintended harm. Students of all levels of familiarity with philanthropy are welcome to join and no discipline is privileged in the class.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER

SUSTAIN 233: Public Policy and Sustainability Challenges: Israel and the Middle East (INTLPOL 273, INTNLREL 117, PUBLPOL 125)

During the past century while, the world's population has more than quadrupled and the population in Israel and its neighbors has grown ten-fold. Mounting consumption has produced an ever-increasing demand for consumer goods and natural resources. At the same time, climate change is already adversely affecting countries in the Middle East. These phenomena combine to place unprecedented pressure on the region's ecosystems and resources, producing myriad insults to environmental quality, public health and local ecosystem integrity. The course considers these issues based on the empirical experience of environmental policies implemented over the past forty-years. The final third of the class considers the potential for regional cooperation to produce improved environmental outcomes. Lectures will address a range of topics associated with concepts of carrying capacity, consumption and the impact of high population density on the quality of life and the environment of Israel and its neighbo more »
During the past century while, the world's population has more than quadrupled and the population in Israel and its neighbors has grown ten-fold. Mounting consumption has produced an ever-increasing demand for consumer goods and natural resources. At the same time, climate change is already adversely affecting countries in the Middle East. These phenomena combine to place unprecedented pressure on the region's ecosystems and resources, producing myriad insults to environmental quality, public health and local ecosystem integrity. The course considers these issues based on the empirical experience of environmental policies implemented over the past forty-years. The final third of the class considers the potential for regional cooperation to produce improved environmental outcomes. Lectures will address a range of topics associated with concepts of carrying capacity, consumption and the impact of high population density on the quality of life and the environment of Israel and its neighbors. The associated potential and limitations of technology, the impact of conflict on the environment and the potential of transboundary cooperation to produce win-win ecological dynamics will also be assessed. Topics considered include, biodiversity, climate change, marine ecosystem protection, water management and environmental justice. The course focuses on the associated policy insights, applying the experience of government interventions for improving the sustainability of life in Israel and the Middle East.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Tal, A. (PI)
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