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1 - 10 of 37 results for: PHYSICS ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

PHYSICS 14N: Quantum Information: Visions and Emerging Technologies

What sets quantum information apart from its classical counterpart is that it can be encoded non-locally, woven into correlations among multiple qubits in a phenomenon known as entanglement. We will discuss paradigms for harnessing entanglement to solve hitherto intractable computational problems or to push the precision of sensors to their fundamental quantum mechanical limits. We will also examine challenges that physicists and engineers are tackling in the laboratory today to enable the quantum technologies of the future.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR, WAY-SMA

PHYSICS 16: The Origin and Development of the Cosmos

How did the present Universe come to be? The last few decades have seen remarkable progress in understanding this age-old question. Course will cover the history of the Universe from its earliest moments to the present day, and the physical laws that govern its evolution. The early Universe including inflation and the creation of matter and the elements. Recent discoveries in our understanding of the makeup of the cosmos, including dark matter and dark energy. Evolution of galaxies, clusters, and quasars, and the Universe as a whole. Implications of dark matter and dark energy for the future evolution of the cosmos. Intended to be accessible to non-science majors, material is explored quantitatively with problem sets using basic algebra and numerical estimates.
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Romani, R. (PI)

PHYSICS 25: Modern Physics

How do the discoveries since the dawn of the 20th century impact our understanding of 21st-century physics? This course introduces the foundations of modern physics: Einstein's theory of special relativity and quantum mechanics. Combining the language of physics with tools from algebra and trigonometry, students gain insights into how the universe works on both the smallest and largest scales. Topics may include atomic, molecular, and laser physics; semiconductors; elementary particles and the fundamental forces; nuclear physics (fission, fusion, and radioactivity); astrophysics and cosmology (the contents and evolution of the universe). Emphasis on applications of modern physics in everyday life, progress made in our understanding of the universe, and open questions that are the subject of active research. Physical understanding fostered by peer interaction and demonstrations in lecture, and interactive group problem solving in discussion sections. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 23 or PHYSICS 23S.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Irwin, K. (PI)

PHYSICS 26: Modern Physics Laboratory

Guided hands-on and simulation-based exploration of concepts in modern physics, including special relativity, quantum mechanics and nuclear physics with an emphasis on student predictions, observations and explanations. Pre- or corequisite: PHYSICS 25.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Devin, J. (PI)

PHYSICS 43: Electricity and Magnetism

What is electricity? What is magnetism? How are they related? How do these phenomena manifest themselves in the physical world? The theory of electricity and magnetism, as codified by Maxwell's equations, underlies much of the observable universe. Students develop both conceptual and quantitative knowledge of this theory. Topics include: electrostatics; magnetostatics; simple AC and DC circuits involving capacitors, inductors, and resistors; integral form of Maxwell's equations; electromagnetic waves. Principles illustrated in the context of modern technologies. Broader scientific questions addressed include: How do physical theories evolve? What is the interplay between basic physical theories and associated technologies? Discussions based on the language of mathematics, particularly differential and integral calculus, and vectors. Physical understanding fostered by peer interaction and demonstrations in lecture, and discussion sections based on interactive group problem solving. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 41, 41E or equivalent. MATH 21 or MATH 51 or CME 100 or equivalent. Recommended corequisite: MATH 52 or CME 102. Please make sure your AP scores are uploaded before enrollment opens.
Terms: Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

PHYSICS 44: Electricity and Magnetism Lab

Hands-on exploration of concepts in electricity, magnetism, and circuits. Introduction to multimeters, function generators, oscilloscopes, and graphing techniques. Pre- or corequisite: PHYSICS 43.
Terms: Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1

PHYSICS 81: Electricity and Magnetism Using Special Relativity and Vector Calculus

(Third in a three-part series: PHYSICS 61, PHYSICS 71, PHYSICS 81.) This course recasts the foundations of electricity and magnetism in a way that will surprise, delight, and challenge students who have already encountered the subject at a college or AP level. Suitable for students contemplating a major in Physics or Engineering Physics, those interested in a rigorous treatment of physics as a foundation for other disciplines, or those curious about powerful concepts like transformations, symmetry, and conservation laws. Electrostatics and Gauss' law. Electric potential, electric field, conductors, image charges. Electric currents, DC circuits. Moving charges, magnetic field as a consequence of special relativity applied to electrostatics, Ampere's law. Solenoids, transformers, induction, AC circuits, resonance. Displacement current, Maxwell's equations. Electromagnetic waves. Throughout, we'll see the objects and theorems of vector calculus become manifest in charges, currents, and electromagnetic fields. Prerequisite: A score of 5 on the AP Physics C E&M exam or Physics 43; Physics 61; and Math 52 or Math 62CM. Recommended prerequisite: Physics 71. Corequisite: Math 53 or Math 63CM. This course was offered as PHYSICS 63 prior to Academic Year 2022-2023.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR, WAY-SMA, GER: DB-NatSci

PHYSICS 89L: Introduction to Data Analysis, with Python and Jupyter

How do we draw conclusions about fundamental physics from experimental data? This course covers basic data analysis techniques and practical statistics used in experimental and computational physics research. Weekly Python-based labs will allow students to explore topics including data visualization, error propagation, evaluating hypotheses, and fitting analytical models. These labs incorporate real and simulated data from existing experiments such as a gamma-ray telescope and a detector that searches for dark matter. Students will learn to use Python libraries running in Jupyter Notebooks to analyze data and will, for example, study the rate at which the universe is expanding using existing data from multiple telescopes. No prior coding experience is required.Corequisite: Physics 71
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 1

PHYSICS 100: Introduction to Observational Astrophysics

Designed for undergraduate physics majors but is open to all students with a calculus-based physics background and some laboratory and coding experience. Students make and analyze observations using the telescopes at the Stanford Student Observatory. Topics covered include navigating the night sky, the physics of stars and galaxies, telescope instrumentation and operation, imaging techniques, quantitative error analysis, and effective scientific communication. The course concludes with an independent project where student teams propose and execute an observational astronomy project of their choosing, using techniques learned in class to gather and analyze their data, and presenting their findings in the forms of professional-style oral presentations and research papers. Suggested preparation: Physics 89L. Enrollment by permission. Due to physical limitations at the observatory, this class has a firm enrollment cap. We may not be able to accommodate all requests to enroll. Before permission numbers are given students must complete this form: https://forms.gle/KDarBRcZWJZG3qr66.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA, GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR
Instructors: Allen, S. (PI)

PHYSICS 108: Advanced Physics Laboratory: Project

Have you ever wanted to dream up a research question, then design, execute, and analyze an experiment to address it, together with a small group of your fellow students? This is an accelerated, guided experimental research experience, resembling real frontier research. Phenomena that have been studied include the magnetization of ferromagnets, the quantum hall effect in graphene, interference in superconducting circuits, loss in nanomechanical resonators, and superfluidity in helium. But most projects pursued (drawn from condensed matter and recently also particle physics) have never been done in the class before. Our equipment and apparatus for Physics 108 are very flexible, and not standardized like in most other lab classes. We provide substantial resources to help your team. Often, with instructors' help, students obtain unique samples from Stanford research groups. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 104, or other experience in electronics. Suggested but less critical: Physics 130 (many phen more »
Have you ever wanted to dream up a research question, then design, execute, and analyze an experiment to address it, together with a small group of your fellow students? This is an accelerated, guided experimental research experience, resembling real frontier research. Phenomena that have been studied include the magnetization of ferromagnets, the quantum hall effect in graphene, interference in superconducting circuits, loss in nanomechanical resonators, and superfluidity in helium. But most projects pursued (drawn from condensed matter and recently also particle physics) have never been done in the class before. Our equipment and apparatus for Physics 108 are very flexible, and not standardized like in most other lab classes. We provide substantial resources to help your team. Often, with instructors' help, students obtain unique samples from Stanford research groups. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 104, or other experience in electronics. Suggested but less critical: Physics 130 (many phenomena you might study build on quantum mechanics) and Physics 106 (experience with data analysis and useful measurement tools: lock-in amplifier, spectrum analyzer.) We recommend taking this class in junior year if possible, as it can inform post-graduation decisions and can empower the professor to write a powerful letter of recommendation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA, WAY-AQR
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