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1 - 5 of 5 results for: OSPCPTWN ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

OSPCPTWN 28: Reimagining Histories of Africa: A Workshop

This class explores, through analysis and practice, the ways in which histories of Africa (with a special focus on Cape Town and South Africa more generally) can be told, narrated, captured, produced, and experienced through means other than what might be called traditional "scholarly" or "academic" historical narratives. While professional historians have long-established methodologies for writing about the past, history is continuously explored by people removed from the academy and uninterested in engaging with many of the historiographical and methodological issues that concern scholars. Put another way, many people think about, relate to, and recreate the past in ways that lack footnotes, citations, and sometimes even words. The course has two main components. First, we will consider how aspects of African history have been treated by non-academics from various walks of life, including artists, writers, archivists, photographers, and engaged citizens. In this aspect of the class, more »
This class explores, through analysis and practice, the ways in which histories of Africa (with a special focus on Cape Town and South Africa more generally) can be told, narrated, captured, produced, and experienced through means other than what might be called traditional "scholarly" or "academic" historical narratives. While professional historians have long-established methodologies for writing about the past, history is continuously explored by people removed from the academy and uninterested in engaging with many of the historiographical and methodological issues that concern scholars. Put another way, many people think about, relate to, and recreate the past in ways that lack footnotes, citations, and sometimes even words. The course has two main components. First, we will consider how aspects of African history have been treated by non-academics from various walks of life, including artists, writers, archivists, photographers, and engaged citizens. In this aspect of the class, Cape Town will be our laboratory; we will take multiple field trips to museums, historical sites, archives, and other relevant exhibitions. If possible, we will schedule meetings with people working to bring the past to life, either through museum work, archival projects, or artistic expression. Approaches will include graphic histories, creative non-fiction, oral histories, art installations, performance and reenactments, and sites of memory, such as museums. Much of our class discussion will be structured around experiencing, critiquing, and understanding the methods used to produce these reflections on the past. We will assess, through weekly exposure to examples, what works, how it works, what doesn't work, and why. But the course is also essentially a creative and research-oriented endeavor. Our analysis of others' works of exhibitions, art, and documentary is undertaken in the service of thinking about students' own projects. Run essentially as a workshop, the latter part of the course will help students develop and create their own reflections on aspects of African history, memory, or the past. Throughout the course, students will start to develop both a subject and a method to capture a historical experience, event, or episode in a way that allows them to express effectively its import ? emotional, political, personal, or otherwise ? for the present. Along the way, students will be expected to help lead discussions, produce short assignments, and make presentations on the development of their project. The main goal of the class, though, will be the production of a final project ? an innovative work of history, a personal and engaging reflection on the past.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Daughton, J. (PI)

OSPCPTWN 30: Introduction to Contemporary Issues in South Africa

This compulsory course provides a brief introduction to social issues in contemporary South Africa. It explores the impact of historical legacies in a post-Apartheid context. Drawing from a range of disciplines, this course provides insights into the form and content of South Africa's socio-political-historic and economic landscapes
Terms: Aut, Spr, Sum | Units: 2
Instructors: Africa, A. (PI)

OSPCPTWN 45: Transitional Justice and Transformation Debates in South Africa

Exploration of transitional justice through critical discussion of contemporary South Africa. Conflicting perspectives of the South African transition through an exploration of the creation of the "rainbow nation" as well as discussions over whether a denial of justice for apartheid-era crimes prevails. Decisions made post-apartheid over how best to confront the large-scale human rights abuses of the past, including South Africa's recent past through the lens of the "pillars" of transitional justice: truth seeking, criminal justice, reparations and institutional reform. Issues of structural violence and the legacies of apartheid in order to question to what extent we can consider South Africa to have realised the promises of its transition
Terms: Aut, Spr, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, WAY-EDP
Instructors: Scanlon, H. (PI)

OSPCPTWN 67: ICT4D: An Introduction to the Use of ICTs for Development

Overview of selected ICT4D initiatives in Africa and South Africa. Engage critically with the optimism that follows technology invention to evaluate context and the digital knowledge gap. Themes such as the notion of technological colonization, co-design, SDG ICT agenda, policy and frameworks and other fundamentals in the field.
Terms: Aut, Spr, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

OSPCPTWN 77: The Anthropocene in Africa: From Colonialism to Climate Crisis

This course explores the conservation practices of communities in Cape Town from colonialism to the present climate crisis. The Anthropocene describes our current epoch in which our human practices fundamentally and irrevocably affect other living systems. This course offers space for three course aims. First, to explore the theories and concepts that explain and situate the Anthropocene in academic literature. Second, to examine the histories of humanities practices that create and continue the Anthropocene. Third, to introduce you to people, practices, and policies that try to mitigate the acceleration of the Anthropocene as it affected their daily lives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Wilks, T. (PI)
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