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1 - 10 of 10 results for: ITALIAN ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ITALIAN 104N: Film and Fascism in Europe (COMPLIT 104N, FILMEDIA 105N, FRENCH 104N)

Controlling people's minds through propaganda is an integral part of fascist regimes' totalitarianism. In the interwar, cinema, a relatively recent mass media, was immediately seized upon by fascist regimes to produce aggrandizing national narratives, justify their expansionist and extermination policies, celebrate the myth of the "Leader," and indoctrinate the people. Yet film makers under these regimes (Rossellini, Renoir) or just after their fall, used the same media to explore and expose how they manufactured conformism, obedience, and mass murder and to interrogate fascism. We will watch films produced by or under European fascist regimes (Nazi Germany, Italy under Mussolini, Greece's Regime of the Colonels) but also against them. The seminar introduces key film analysis tools and concepts, while offering insights into the history of propaganda and cinema. Taught in English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Alduy, C. (PI)

ITALIAN 129: Introduction to Modern Italian Literature and Culture

Ancient, yet new; united, yet fractured; central, yet marginal; imperial subject, aspirant empire: what historical, political, and social dynamics have shaped the Italian nation over the course of the last two centuries? How do we make sense of this Italy - at once monolithic and multitudinous, longstanding and newborn? Through the study of literary, filmic, and musical works from the period of Italian unification to the turn of the 21st century, students will reflect on how artists, writers, cultural and political movements expressed, influenced, and encoded Italy¿s many, paradoxical modernities. The course is an introduction to modern Italian literature and culture and a continuation of the study of the Italian language. All class discussions, reading, and writing will be in Italian. Please do not hesitate to contact the instructor should you have doubts about your language level.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Dule, G. (PI)

ITALIAN 199: Individual Work

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit

ITALIAN 200: Italian Lecture Series and Course (ITALIAN 300)

Lecture series and seminar on Italian literature, cinema, and culture. We invite 3-6 speakers per year to address us about their recent work or work in progress, so as to get a better knowledge of very recent trends in the field of Italian studies, both in the US and abroad. Seminar meetings, when speakers are not invited, are for the following: (a) preparation and follow-up discussion of speakers' work; (b) presentation of students' current research; or (c) presentation of recent work in the field. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 30 units total)

ITALIAN 300: Italian Lecture Series and Course (ITALIAN 200)

Lecture series and seminar on Italian literature, cinema, and culture. We invite 3-6 speakers per year to address us about their recent work or work in progress, so as to get a better knowledge of very recent trends in the field of Italian studies, both in the US and abroad. Seminar meetings, when speakers are not invited, are for the following: (a) preparation and follow-up discussion of speakers' work; (b) presentation of students' current research; or (c) presentation of recent work in the field. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 30 units total)
Instructors: Wittman, L. (PI)

ITALIAN 303: Innovation and Transformation of the Counter-Reformation: Religion and Culture in Early Modern Italy

Between the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, following the Council of Trent (1545?63) and the attempt of the Catholic Church to reformulate its doctrines and regulate its disciplinary and spiritual renewal, Italian religious life and culture underwent remarkable transformations affecting all branches of human knowledge. As the nature of these transformations has long been the subject of scholarly debate, the literature and culture of the Counter-Reformation continue to be prejudicially neglected by scholars as products of a systematically repressive period. However, the complex cultural milieu of post-Tridentine Italy generated innovative and varied expressions of art, religion, science, and literature. This course intends to investigate a wide range of these cultural products, from lyric to epic poetry, from drama to non-fictional narrative, from visual arts to music. Works of this period are influenced by a uniquely syncretic religiosity and spirituality that reflect a profoundly more »
Between the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, following the Council of Trent (1545?63) and the attempt of the Catholic Church to reformulate its doctrines and regulate its disciplinary and spiritual renewal, Italian religious life and culture underwent remarkable transformations affecting all branches of human knowledge. As the nature of these transformations has long been the subject of scholarly debate, the literature and culture of the Counter-Reformation continue to be prejudicially neglected by scholars as products of a systematically repressive period. However, the complex cultural milieu of post-Tridentine Italy generated innovative and varied expressions of art, religion, science, and literature. This course intends to investigate a wide range of these cultural products, from lyric to epic poetry, from drama to non-fictional narrative, from visual arts to music. Works of this period are influenced by a uniquely syncretic religiosity and spirituality that reflect a profoundly interiorized experience of the Divine. With their unique blend of the pagan and Christian, literary and visual, marvelous and edifying, heroic and saintly, aesthetic and pious, theoretical and empirical, moral decorum and stylistic conceit, the cultural products of post-Tridentine Italy aim at triggering an emotional response in the mind of the devout reader. Due to the affective nature of the spirituality these works entail, male and female writers and artists highly value the relationship between devotion, creativity, and identity and act as self-aware agents of a complex cultural synergy, the nature of which is experiential rather than normative. A closer look at these neglected authors reveals the importance of the period's cultural shift, its intellectual and creative richness, and its enduring legacy. All the readings will be in English translation; there are no prerequisites or language requirements. Students will be occasionally allowed to select their own primary readings and are expected to produce a research essay on an elective topic, as well as several informal writing assignments.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5

ITALIAN 395: Philosophical Reading Group (COMPLIT 359A, FRENCH 395)

Discussion of one contemporary or historical text from the Western philosophical tradition per quarter in a group of faculty and graduate students. For admission of new participants, a conversation with Professor Robert Harrison is required. May be repeated for credit. Taught in English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Harrison, R. (PI)

ITALIAN 399: Individual Work

Repeatable for Credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit

ITALIAN 680: Curricular Practical Training

CPT course required for international students completing degree. Prerequisite: Italian Ph.D. candidate.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit

ITALIAN 802: TGR Dissertation

Doctoral students who have been admitted to candidacy, completed all required courses and degree requirements other than the University oral exam and dissertation, completed 135 units or 10.5 quarters of residency (if under the old residency policy), and submitted a Doctoral Dissertation Reading Committee form, may request Terminal Graduate Registration status to complete their dissertations.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit
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