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1 - 10 of 18 results for: INTNLREL ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

INTNLREL 35SI: Frontiers of International Security: Policy, Research, and Innovation

This 1-unit, student-initiated course will provide undergraduate students the opportunity to engage with faculty from across the university conducting research relating to international security. Students will have the opportunity to learn about cutting-edge research taking place at Stanford and be exposed to topics and subfields they may otherwise not have access to as undergraduates. The class will be framed around four subfields within international security studies: emerging technologies and intelligence; insurgent organizations and non-state actors; great power competition and the future of conflict; and nuclear weapons and arms control negotiation. To apply for enrollment, please complete this brief interest form: https://forms.gle/Ax3Jsinuwk3mBWww5
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Schultz, K. (PI)

INTNLREL 39SI: Women in National Security

Women continue to be significantly underrepresented across all sectors of the contemporary national security landscape. This course addresses this disparity by providing students the opportunity to engage deeply with women engaged in prominent national security roles across a range of expertise areas and disciplines. Weekly speakers will share their personal stories and experiences and offer perspectives on addressing pressing national security issues of our time, ranging from great power competition to cybersecurity to refugees and migration. Speakers will also discuss the intersection of women's rights and security and the challenges of achieving enduring peace when rights and liberties are not afforded equally to women. This course is an initiative of WINS (Women in National Security) at Stanford's Gordian Knot Center for National Security Innovation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Felter, J. (PI)

INTNLREL 102: History of the International System since 1914 (HISTORY 102)

The course seeks to explain the history of international relations in the tumultuous century since 1914. It aims at a three-dimensional understanding, relating social and political structures of countries and regions to the primary shifts in the character of the competition between states, in the composition of the system, and in international institutions and norms. Great power interactions constitute the most visible element within the course: through the two world wars, into the Cold War, and beyond. Concurrently, we look within the empires and blocs of the Twentieth Century world, to consider the changing relationships between imperial centers and subject peoples. Lastly, we consider spirited if sporadic international efforts to pursue order, justice, and progress. This last pursuit also requires study of the proliferation of transnational non-governmental organizations (NGOs).
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom
Instructors: Rakove, R. (PI)

INTNLREL 110D: War and Peace in American Foreign Policy (AMSTUD 110D, POLISCI 110D, POLISCI 110Y)

The causes of war in American foreign policy. Issues: international and domestic sources of war and peace; war and the American political system; war, intervention, and peace making in the post-Cold War period. Political Science majors taking this course for WIM credit should enroll in POLISCI 110D for 5 units. International Relations majors taking this course for WIM credit should enroll in INTNLREL 110D for 5 units. All students not seeking WIM credit should enroll in POLISCI 110Y or AMSTUD 110D.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, GER:DB-SocSci

INTNLREL 117: Public Policy and Sustainability Challenges: Israel and the Middle East (INTLPOL 273, PUBLPOL 125, SUSTAIN 233)

During the past century while, the world's population has more than quadrupled and the population in Israel and its neighbors has grown ten-fold. Mounting consumption has produced an ever-increasing demand for consumer goods and natural resources. At the same time, climate change is already adversely affecting countries in the Middle East. These phenomena combine to place unprecedented pressure on the region's ecosystems and resources, producing myriad insults to environmental quality, public health and local ecosystem integrity. The course considers these issues based on the empirical experience of environmental policies implemented over the past forty-years. The final third of the class considers the potential for regional cooperation to produce improved environmental outcomes. Lectures will address a range of topics associated with concepts of carrying capacity, consumption and the impact of high population density on the quality of life and the environment of Israel and its neighbo more »
During the past century while, the world's population has more than quadrupled and the population in Israel and its neighbors has grown ten-fold. Mounting consumption has produced an ever-increasing demand for consumer goods and natural resources. At the same time, climate change is already adversely affecting countries in the Middle East. These phenomena combine to place unprecedented pressure on the region's ecosystems and resources, producing myriad insults to environmental quality, public health and local ecosystem integrity. The course considers these issues based on the empirical experience of environmental policies implemented over the past forty-years. The final third of the class considers the potential for regional cooperation to produce improved environmental outcomes. Lectures will address a range of topics associated with concepts of carrying capacity, consumption and the impact of high population density on the quality of life and the environment of Israel and its neighbors. The associated potential and limitations of technology, the impact of conflict on the environment and the potential of transboundary cooperation to produce win-win ecological dynamics will also be assessed. Topics considered include, biodiversity, climate change, marine ecosystem protection, water management and environmental justice. The course focuses on the associated policy insights, applying the experience of government interventions for improving the sustainability of life in Israel and the Middle East.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Tal, A. (PI)

INTNLREL 123: The Future of the European Union: Challenges and Opportunities

First, this course analyzes the EU's greatest challenge, preserving the monetary union, and discusses the political and economic reforms needed to achieve that goal. In this context the course also studies the fiscal and budgetary polices of the EU. Second, the course discusses the EU's role in global politics, its desire to play a more prominent role, and the ways to reach that objective. Third, the course analyzes the EU's institutional challenges in its efforts to enhance its democratic character.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Crombez, C. (PI)

INTNLREL 125: Global Human Rights and Local Practices (HUMRTS 122, INTLPOL 282, SOC 115, SOC 215)

The course examines how the international community has fared in promoting and protecting human rights in the world, with an emphasis on the role of the United Nations. The course will begin with an overview of debates about the state of the international human rights system in the contemporary world, and then examine how international society has addressed the challenges of implementing universal human rights principles in different local contexts across different issues. The specific rights issues examined include genocide, children's rights, labor rights, transitional justice, women's rights, indigenous rights, NGOs, and the complicated relationship between the US and global human rights. The course will feature video conference/guest lecture sessions with leading human rights scholars and practitioners, providing students with unique opportunities to hear their expert opinions based on research and experience.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Tsutsui, K. (PI)

INTNLREL 140B: Navigating New Frontiers in International Law

In this seminar, students will delve into the interplay between international law and international relations, with a focus on understanding the challenges and opportunities presented by emerging technologies, particularly AI. Through examining legal and political theories and case studies, students will gain insights into the role of international law in shaping state behavior, global governance, and cooperation. Key topics include treaty-making processes, soft law, customary international law, state sovereignty, and the impact of new frontiers in international law, such as AI regulation. As AI technologies advance, they pose novel legal, ethical, and practical questions transcending national borders. This class will investigate AI's implications on human rights, privacy, and international security, exploring issues like autonomous weapons, surveillance, and AI-driven decision-making. The course will address central questions such as: How does the intersection of international law and more »
In this seminar, students will delve into the interplay between international law and international relations, with a focus on understanding the challenges and opportunities presented by emerging technologies, particularly AI. Through examining legal and political theories and case studies, students will gain insights into the role of international law in shaping state behavior, global governance, and cooperation. Key topics include treaty-making processes, soft law, customary international law, state sovereignty, and the impact of new frontiers in international law, such as AI regulation. As AI technologies advance, they pose novel legal, ethical, and practical questions transcending national borders. This class will investigate AI's implications on human rights, privacy, and international security, exploring issues like autonomous weapons, surveillance, and AI-driven decision-making. The course will address central questions such as: How does the intersection of international law and relations shape global challenges? What principles and sources of international law influence state behavior and cooperation? How do emerging technologies, particularly AI, challenge existing legal frameworks? What is the current landscape of AI regulation, and what are the prospects for global governance? This seminar aims to equip students with the analytical and critical thinking skills necessary to engage in shaping the future of international law in a rapidly evolving technological landscape. The course is suitable for advanced undergraduates. Prior coursework in international law or international relations is recommended but not required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Heller, B. (PI)

INTNLREL 142: Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs, Democracy, Development and Environmental Justice (AFRICAST 142, AFRICAST 242, CSRE 142C, URBANST 135)

This community-engaged learning class is part of a broader collaboration between the Program on Social Entrepreneurship at the Haas Center for Public Service, Distinguished Visitors Program and the Doerr School of Sustainability, using practice to better inform theory about how innovation can help address society's biggest challenges with a particular focus on environmental justice, sustainability and climate resilience for frontline and marginalized communities who have or will experience environmental harms. Working with the instructor and the 2024 Distinguished Visitors ? Angela McKee-Brown, founder and CEO of Project Reflect; Jason Su, executive director of the Guadalupe River Park Conservancy; Cecilia Taylor, founder, executive director, and CEO of Belle Haven Action; and Violet Wulf-Saena, founder and executive director of Climate Resilient Communities ? students will use case studies of successful and failed social change strategies to explore relationships between social entrep more »
This community-engaged learning class is part of a broader collaboration between the Program on Social Entrepreneurship at the Haas Center for Public Service, Distinguished Visitors Program and the Doerr School of Sustainability, using practice to better inform theory about how innovation can help address society's biggest challenges with a particular focus on environmental justice, sustainability and climate resilience for frontline and marginalized communities who have or will experience environmental harms. Working with the instructor and the 2024 Distinguished Visitors ? Angela McKee-Brown, founder and CEO of Project Reflect; Jason Su, executive director of the Guadalupe River Park Conservancy; Cecilia Taylor, founder, executive director, and CEO of Belle Haven Action; and Violet Wulf-Saena, founder and executive director of Climate Resilient Communities ? students will use case studies of successful and failed social change strategies to explore relationships between social entrepreneurship, race, systemic inequities, democracy and justice. This course interrogates approaches like design theory, measuring impact, fundraising, leadership, storytelling, and policy advocacy with the Distinguished Visitors providing practical examples from their work on how this theory plays out in practice. This is a community-engaged learning class in which students will learn by working on projects that support the social entrepreneurs' efforts to promote social change. Students should register for either 3 OR 5 units only. Students enrolled in the full 5 units will have a service-learning component along with the course. Students enrolled for 3 units will not complete the service-learning component. Limited enrollment. Attendance at the first class is mandatory in order to participate in service learning. Graduate and undergraduate students may enroll.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Janus, K. (PI)

INTNLREL 146A: Energy and Climate Cooperation in the Western Hemisphere (INTNLREL 246A)

The seminar provides an overview of the current political dynamics in each of the major fossil fuel producing countries in the Western Hemisphere and its impact on local energy exploration and production. It also explores the potential for expanding existing or developing new renewable energy resources throughout the Americas, and impacts on the local environment, food prices, and land use issues. The course examines the feasibility of integrating energy markets and establishing initiatives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions at the regional and hemispheric level. The seminar focuses on Chile, a country that lacks significant petroleum and natural gas reserves and has traditionally been a major user of coal. Accordingly, the country has been at the forefront of efforts to facilitate the regional integration of energy markets and develop renewable and non-traditional energy resources. The course concludes with a discussion of the Energy and Climate Partnership of the Americas or ECPA, launched by the Obama administration at the Fifth Summit of the Americas in Trinidad in April 2009, and China's increasing role in Latin America's energy sector. Students taking this course for the M.A. in Latin American Studies should enroll in the INTNLREL 246A section.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: O'Keefe, T. (PI)
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